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Author Topic: New Setup for new ham.  (Read 672 times)
KE5PXT
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Posts: 2




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« on: September 23, 2007, 12:09:04 PM »

What is the best way to run coax and ground wire into the house? I have an all brick house on a slab, and the installation must be wife friendly.

Also I have tough homeowners association and have 2 options on using a dipole.

1. Hang the dipole from palm tree and run wires to the top of the wood fence at the corners of the yard.

2. Hang the dipole from rafters on inside, run wires thru vents and along the ridgeline on backside of the roof. This option puts wire 10 ft higher than tree option.

What about lightening protection with either option?
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12770




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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2007, 04:25:35 PM »

The outside antenna will work far better than an inside one, even if it is not as high.

One way to bring wires into the house is to cut a hole and mount an electrical PVC "LB" box on the outside. An "LB" box has a round opening going through the wall and a round opening for a conduit connection on the bottom edge. Run the wires through the bottom hole, make the 90 degree turn, and into the house. Plug the bottom hole with coax seal to keep out the critters.

Another option is to close a window on a piece of wood and run the wires through holes in the wood.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2007, 04:28:25 PM »

For lightning protection you need to ground the coax shield just before it enters the house. You also need to connect your coax ground system the the home electrical service ground. The Polyphaser web site has a whole lot of good information on lightning protection for amateur antennas.

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ONAIR
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Posts: 1738




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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2007, 03:06:14 AM »

    Another option might be to run a wire up the palm tree, and just bury a bunch of radials in the surrounding ground!  You can then hide your coax under the soil running over to the house.  I've seen some stealth ham antennas done this way, that were for all intents and purposes invisible to the HOA Gestapos!
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KE5PXT
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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2007, 07:54:49 AM »

What do you think is the best way to run the coax and ground wire thru an all brick house and look good in case I sell next year.
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KE5QKT
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Posts: 76




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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2007, 08:05:35 AM »

I would use the smallest piece of pvc that will accomodate your feedline and ground wire and use a masonry bit to go thru the brick and/or motar joint. I have the same situation and this is what I plan to do, only, I do not want to mount a box on the outside of the brick. I will most likely build a copper bulk head for in between the studs and mount an antenna switch and arrestors to it and then on to the radios.

Doug
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KE5QKT
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Posts: 76




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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2007, 08:05:35 AM »

I would use the smallest piece of pvc that will accomodate your feedline and ground wire and use a masonry bit to go thru the brick and/or motar joint. I have the same situation and this is what I plan to do, only, I do not want to mount a box on the outside of the brick. I will most likely build a copper bulk head for in between the studs and mount an antenna switch and arrestors to it and then on to the radios.

Doug
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W5GA
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Posts: 430




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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2007, 08:11:58 AM »

Depending on what kind of windows you have, you might try this.

http://www.mfjenterprises.com/products.php?prodid=MFJ-4602
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2007, 10:22:21 AM »

I'd just use a masonry bit to drill through the brick.  I've done this dozens of times.  It's easier to make a few small holes than it is to make one large one.

I'd put the antenna outside, as AA4PB suggests.  If your home is "all brick" construction, that's not a good thing for indoor antennas, unless the bricks end below the attic and it's all wood above that.

WB2WIK/6
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1738




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« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2007, 12:32:08 AM »

    I agree.  Drill through the side with a masonry bit.  When the time comes to move, just do a good patch and no one will know.
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KD5PKS
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Posts: 58




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« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2007, 05:58:06 AM »

Apparently your station is in a room with an exterior wall. Depending on the construction of your home, you might consider going in under the soffit and bring the cables in through the ceiling or top of the wall above the bricks. The soffit is easier to repair than the bricks.
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