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Author Topic: Ground and gas line  (Read 660 times)
W9ADY
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Posts: 12




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« on: September 06, 2007, 06:59:50 AM »

The gas meter is just outside my shack.  If I run the shortest ground possible will be close to a gas line.  How far should I keep the ground from a gas line?  If I put in a ground rod and tie it in to the existing home ground, is it safe to run the wire connecting the two past the gas meter?
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2007, 07:48:04 AM »

Shouldn't be a problem.  I wouldn't ground to the gas line but running past shouldn't be an issue.  My meter is right next to my electric meter also and I have done the same.
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2416




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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2007, 06:24:34 PM »

The general rule of thumb in lightning protection is to bond to any metalic object within 6 feet. So if you are 6 or more feet away, No problem.
If less than 6 feet, I would simply bond to the gas line. (HOWEVER if doing so, I would also take great care to make sure I had a substantial and correctly installed ground system so this bonding did not cause any problem!)
I would also try to find out what the gas pipe really is. Older ones were steel. Most all newer ones are plastic.  Natural gas that runs to an entire grid? Or propane that runs to a big tank in the yard?

At commercial tower sites, The propane line is bonded to the ground system at the building and tank at both ends, Underground.
Note the difference in terminology. You are not "grounding" to a gas line, You are bonding it to the ground system.
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WA4PTZ
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Posts: 528




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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2007, 02:55:26 PM »

When seeking a GOOD grounding source one should not
assume anything, else one will be visited by Murphy.
In the case of Gas lines and meters, I'd be sure, not
assume. Yes, in real life and according to some
municipal codes all metallic utilities should be
common bonded, but in reality they are'nt. I prefer
the electrical neutral ground because they use an
eight foot ground rod. I have made me a small trench
on several occasions to bond to it, after I placed
my own 8 foot ground rod and attached to it, closest
to my radio equipment. This is too important an
issue to ASSUME.
Also, paint and plastic coatings do not make a low
resistance ground. Scrape, brush and clean until you
achieve bare, shiny copper to bond.
I almost forgot, some natural gas systems introduce
a low negative voltage onto their entire grid to
reduce corrosion.
Good Luck,
Tim
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WA9AFM
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Posts: 208




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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2007, 12:33:46 PM »

Besides finding out what the gas line is made of, I would also have it 'spotted', i.e. where does it run.  Not good form to put a ground rod through any utility line. Most utilities provide this service for free.
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2416




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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2007, 10:25:02 PM »

"Besides finding out what the gas line is made of, I would also have it 'spotted', i.e. where does it run. Not good form to put a ground rod through any utility line. Most utilities provide this service for free."

YEP!   VERY important point!  
 
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3721




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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2007, 06:14:01 PM »

hi,

don't want to be a wise guy...

let the gas line be a gas line, nothing else.

you may notice a wire wrapped on the line,
it is for cathodic protection.

most newer lines transition to plastic line below
the surface.

73 james
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5981




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« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2007, 11:56:03 AM »

I saw this comment:

"I would simply bond to the gas line."

Not a good idea--in some municipalities and states it is illegal to make a ground connection to a gas line.  Check the NEC--I believe it also prohibits such a connection.
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