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Author Topic: Operating Position  (Read 2968 times)
KI4MF
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« on: October 26, 2007, 01:26:04 PM »

Hi all.  I am presently redoing my station, and I am looking for operating table ideas.  Anyone aware of commercial firms offering perhaps plans and designs?

tHANKS MUCH,

hANK - KI4MF
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2007, 03:22:11 PM »

Nope, everyone homebrews their own.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1738




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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2007, 02:55:11 AM »

   Contact Ethan Allen furniture.  They may be able to create and custom design one for you.
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W7AIT
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Posts: 488




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« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2007, 09:43:59 AM »

Typical is a desk with a "riser".  Mine is a basic desk and credenza in a the clasic office "L" with a riser on the credenza.

You can buy all of this from office supply stores in knock down, and you can modify as you see fit.

Computer hutches, computer tables, computer desks also work.

Cheapie is a door on 2 saw horses.
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2007, 07:27:00 PM »

This looks like a really well thought out design for an operating desk:

http://hamdesk.com/
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NA0AA
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2007, 09:30:14 AM »

I'll second the Ham Desk, I have one and it's uniquely suited to the task.

XYL likes the look as well.
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W5CPT
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Posts: 557




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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007, 02:06:38 AM »

After many computer tables and small desks and even a folding banquet table I finally built my own. (well almost - not quite finished yet) I bought a 80" X 32" Hollow Core door at Lowe's, sanded it a bit, stained it a dark oak and then Polyurethaned (sp?) it. The legs are a simple frame of 2X4s and I finally have a desk big enough to hold the radio, computer, amp and associated accessories.

The unfinshed part is that I also bought an 18" X 80" Hollow Core door for a shelf. The shelf will be held up by supports at both ends and one in the middle, but in the back. This will be for the rotor control, power meter and and other bits and pieces that I want at eye-level.

I used it last weekend for the CQWW SSB contest and it was great having all my equipment on one level where I could reach everything. Prior to the table I used:

A computer table
a small desk
a short two drawer file cabinet
and a roll around TV stand

all at the same time.

I could not reach the amp (on the TV stand) and the radio (on the desk) at the same time without rolling back and forth in my chair.

You might want to google "ham shack photos" and see what others have done. There is at least one Ham Radio store website that has a gallery of pictures. A lot of hams like the Vertical Approach, building a wall of equipment, but I don't think that would appeal to me, as I prefer a spread out station.

Clint - W5CPT
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W7AIT
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« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2007, 03:59:30 PM »

That ham desk is a Pizza Table in my opinion.  No place for your feet, legs, uncomfortable.  Looks unstable too.  Pictures show crowded piles of equipment, monitors wrong height, too small, too pricey.  For that you can get desks at Office Depot.
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NA0AA
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« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2007, 10:58:19 PM »

W7AIT - Pizza table?  horses for courses I guess.  My station works well, I'm sure yours does.  I looked for cheaper options and decided that the few extra bucks [and if you price GOOD furniture, not corporate cast-offs second-hand] were worth it for the unique design benefits of the HamDesk.

It's very stable, and I have the 6' unit which is large enough for a decent station.  If you are a serious hardware collector or operate all bands at the same time, maybe it's not for you.

I rather like my station setup to look nice and it suits the bill for me.
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N3BIF
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« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2007, 12:54:47 PM »

Buy?    
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2007, 09:46:30 AM »

I've spent many hours working and re-working my station setup and have learned a lot in that time.  It is much easier the less equipment you have.  Duh...

There are all kinds of ways to go with tables.  Credenza-type setups are wonderful.  Unfortunately they are very expensive.  I ended up with a table, the kind like you would find at yard sales or Church Bazaars.  They are very strong and durable.  I found a remnant piece of carpet and put that on it and it works great.  Restaraunt Supplies carry them and they are inexpensive.  You can put power supplies under them and boxes of things from the xyl, hi.  

Do your best to make the connections as simple as possible because when you have the need to sniff out RF, you don't have to stand on your head to get to things.  Don't laugh too hard at my next question...is your room left-handed or right-handed.  It affects how many options you have in setting things up.  Have fun!
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W4WGA
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Posts: 61




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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2007, 05:58:02 PM »

The XYL has allocated me minimal space. 36" in front of a window between two bookcases.  First made a copper station entrance that fits inside the window jam with all the ICE surge protectors.  The sash fits down on top locking it in place.  Inside I put adjustable shelf supports on the outside of both bookshelves.  Desk is a 36"x28" piece of stained and polyurethaned 3/4 ply. Three 36x16 shelves up the window.  Xmtrs, display & keyboard on the desk top.  Tuner, rotor control, satellite receiver, SWR meter, antenna switch, Signalink & Pactor II on the first shelf.  O'scope, signal generator, DVMM, function generator and lab PS on the second shelf.  Manuals, books, solder station & parts cabinets on the third.  (I did have to appropriate part of one lower bookcase shelf for the power supply.)

When I need to rewire or track down some stray RF I go outside and raise the window.  Instant access!
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NA0AA
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« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2007, 12:08:58 AM »

N5XN Said:  I've spent many hours working and re-working my station setup and have learned a lot in that time. It is much easier the less equipment you have. Duh...

Yea, logic dictates this, but you do keep accumulating stuff.  Although really, you can only talk on one radio at a time.

I sort of figure that once you hit about 6 or 7 radios you become a collector.  Not that there's anything wrong with that as such...<G>

One item in my shack that I cannot figure out how I ever lived w/out is a scanner.  It lets me keep an ear on all of the repeaters and local simplex operations, plus on bad weather days it's interesting to listen to Air Traffic Control.

The advantage of the scanner is memory banks and speed of searching.  Mine has some interesting scan features that you can use to survey frequencies - scan with automatic frequency save and the like - plus you can scan CB frequencies if needed.  Mine has a dedicated Discone antenna and is very useful indeed.
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2007, 04:27:03 PM »

<< The XYL has allocated me minimal space. 36" in front of a window between two bookcases.>>

How sad! Does she allow you to limit HER hobby to 36 inches of space?

I'm so happy I have a wife who not only doesn't tell me what to do with my hobby, she helps me with it, even though she has no interest in radio. She helps erect antennas, pull coax and all those good things. This afternoon she helped me erect my new weather station on the roof and run the cables through the nice 2.5" hole in the wall of my shack. Smiley

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
W3LK
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« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2007, 04:29:53 PM »

<< First made a copper station entrance that fits inside the window jam with all the ICE surge protectors.>>

These should be mounted OUTSIDE the house, connected to your ground rod, which is in turn bonded to your electrical single point ground.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
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