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Author Topic: Operating Position  (Read 2334 times)
W1YB
Member

Posts: 93




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« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2007, 04:58:49 PM »

The 'Ham Desk' is the best bang for the buck.  I've had mine for over a year (Please see my 2 eHam reviews.

I love mine and can not comprehend any negative comments regarding its design, construction or use!
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N2IK
Member

Posts: 220




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« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2007, 06:15:08 PM »

I have a 42 inch wide position based on a library table with a home built equipment riser shelf on top. The table is 42W by 30 deep by 30 high solid hardwood bought as an inexpensive unfinished furniture piece and finished with gelled polyurethane stain/varnish combination. The riser was custom built of MDF 12 inch deep bullnose closet shelf boards. The cheapest easist to machine thing I could find. It is braced front and back with pine 1 by 2. Glued and screwed and painted with Rustoleum Bronze Satin finish oil base paint. The flatter finish hides a multitude of sins. With the MDF you need to accurately machine the screw holes or it will be split by the screws. The copper 1/4 by 1 inch ground buss bar is screwed to the back of the riser. Buss bar has a lot of 8-32 and a few 1/4-20 tapped holes for stainless screws and a few 3/8 inch clearance holes. The two riser center supports were planned to accomodate the FT920 with manual tuner on top of it, telegraph keys in center, and other gear on the left and on top of the riser. I spent more on the copper bar than on the paint, wood and MDF together. It is tight but workable and more risers can be stacked on top.

Some day I will shorten the table legs and add casters so it will be easy to pull out the desk and get to the back cabling and so forth. I am designing an L shaped add-on to accomodate my laptop and underneath it, an amplifier/shack warmer. I ran dedicated circuits for the radios and a 220 VAC circuit for the amplifier. Add an office chair and a halogen desk lamp and you have it.

If I had more width to work with, I would have used a door on two filing cabinets or an office desk.

Another sturdy option is to buy a hardwood butcher block workbench top and either make the legs nad apron from lumber, or buy prefab workbench legs. That can make a really strong good looking bench for reasonable prices. The tops are available in 24, 30, and 36 inch depths with various widths.

73 de Walt N2IK
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NB2A
Member

Posts: 9


WWW

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« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2007, 06:31:44 PM »

Winstead has a good website and designing options too.
Used in broadcast in fact.

73s
NB2A
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