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Author Topic: Building a RF friendly shack and house  (Read 1731 times)
KR6G
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Posts: 17




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« on: August 29, 2008, 09:21:29 PM »

Had a house fire and now get to rebuild 90 percent of house, would like to know where to buy RF friendly lights, heaters, appliances. Also plan on building a nice room for tv and surround sound, tv theater type.

would appreciate any and all ideals. Trying to turn a bad thing into a happy ordeal.

thanks
Alex kr6g
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K8AC
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Posts: 1745




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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2008, 05:46:35 AM »

If you have to replace your furnace, read through the posts in this forum for the past couple of years and do not buy one of the newest technology furnaces with the variable speed blowers.

Second, stay away from large screen Plasma TVs - go with LCD.  
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AA4PB
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Posts: 14300




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« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2008, 10:19:23 AM »

The best thing to do, if you can, is to place the antennas away from the house. Most of the RFI issues (both directions) result from an antenna placed too close. My antennas are about 100 feet away from the house with coax feed lines running in conduit about a foot underground.

Rebuilding the house is a good time to consider a proper single-point grounding system (see the Polyphase web site) and dedicated 120V and 240V power to the shack. Put your shack lighting on a separate circuit so that if you pop a radio breaker you aren't suddenly in the dark. I use florescent light fixtures (4-foot bulbs with solid-state starters) to light the shack and have absolutly no noise problems with them.

It might also be a good time to consider the ability to power the shack from an emergency generator. I fixed a box out in the garage where I can connect a generator and switch shack power over to it.
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2415




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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2008, 12:23:29 AM »

Keeping antennas far from a house is fine for HF antennas, But NOT OK for VHF/UHF!!!!   Due to the very large feedline loss at VHF and UHF. Keep a VHF/UHF tower or mast Close to the radio as possible.
And do use good low loss coax for VHF/UHF. Times LMR-400 minimum for shorter runs up to 75 or so feet.

(Belden RG-213 is still the best coax for HF)

A "whole house" surge suppressor installed at the main electric entrance panel, And be sure to bond all grounds together.

For some good info:  
http://members.cox.net/pc-usa/station/ground0.htm

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AA4PB
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Posts: 14300




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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2008, 08:27:20 AM »

But NOT OK for VHF/UHF!!!!
---------------------------
That kind of depends on what coax you use. 150-foot run of hard line is not unreasonable on 2M and 440MHz. On the other hand, if you use 150-foot run of RG58 on 2M and 440MHz you'll have a LOT of loss.

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