Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ft101 for beginner?  (Read 1121 times)
KD8EYF
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« on: September 20, 2009, 01:58:20 AM »

hey guys want to buy a used HF radio but dont want to spend alot of money. i am thinking about ft101 series, thinking about a later model with the digital display. Any advice or things to look out for with these? any other suggestion on a good cheap 160-10 thats not crap?
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20560




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2009, 09:45:24 AM »

An FT-101ZD (digital display rig, and the later models covered the WARC bands) is a good, solid transceiver and far better than the earlier models.  

Then, a TS-530S, which covers the WARC bands and has a strong legacy in the TS-520S, is also a very good choice for an older rig that's not expensive but works well.

Both use three tubes and require transmitter "tune up," but that's no big deal unless you want to operate mobile.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 391




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2009, 07:45:35 PM »

For around $400 ($500 max) you should be able to find a clean Kenwood TS830s.

It's a generation newer than the 101, and a MUCH better radio with one of the best receivers ever made.

Covers the WARC bands, has a digital display and is much easier to tune up than any of the Yaesu hybrid (tube final) rigs.

Rated 4.9/5 in eHam.net reviews:
http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/440

I had one for more than 10 years.
Let it go only because I needed an all solid-state radio with computer rig-control.

Good luck.

73,

Mel - KS2G
Logged
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2009, 05:38:00 PM »

hi,

I agree, the Kenwood is your best bet,
I have the 520 and the 530.

the Kenwoods use 6146B or 6146W finals (pair)
while the Yaesu used sweep tubes.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TS-520_820_530_830/

73 james
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20560




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2009, 10:04:05 AM »

The FT-101ZD didn't use sweep tubes, it uses 6146Bs.

It's the "top of the line" in the FT-101 series and runs rings around the other models.  It's actually very similar to a Kenwood TS-830S and usually sells for about the same price.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2009, 07:57:31 PM »

hi Steve,

I did know about the ZD model,
thanks for correcting my error.

73 james
Logged
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2009, 07:58:00 PM »

hi Steve,

I did not know about the ZD model,
thanks for correcting my error.

73 james
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 454




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2009, 08:39:23 PM »

I have had  a FT-101 and TS-520.  Great rigs!  Moved up to a FT-890AT and never looked back.  Turn it on and transmit.

Mike
Logged
K1SGS
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2009, 01:36:53 AM »

i picked up a used kenwood ts-520 as my first rig, and while it is fun to mess with a little, ever since i got my yaesu ft-890sat, i hardly ever fire up the ts-520.  too much of a pain to have to adjust the antenna tuner and peak and dip all that junk.  i like having the internal auto antenna tuner, and not having to tune for every band change.  something to think about.  the older tube rigs are probably better left for someone with more experience.
Logged
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2009, 05:38:40 PM »

hi,

Stephen, K1SGS is right, a little more work needed
on these older radios but once you have an elmer
show you how to tune up, you'll be able to do it
in a few seconds or so.  they are also easy to
repair with the schematics and modern parts.

I also have the 520, 530 and the 570 from kenwood,
all get used as often as I can.

Before I earned General, I learned a lot from my
520 and 530, just remember drive-plate-load,
across the top row and you're good to go.

Here is one way to tune a kenwood hybrid radio

http://www.k4eaa.com/tune-up.htm

73 james
Logged
K1NVY
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2009, 07:01:33 PM »

You didn't say how much money you can lay out for a rig.

I'd suggest an Icom IC-751 or IC-745 both of which can be had for about $300 each.  The 751 was Icom's top of line rig (well, almost) in the mid-80's. They are still very good radios in basic perfomance. The 754's receiver was one of the most sensitive ever measured by ARRL, in the order of -148dBm.  

Fred/K1NVY
Logged
K1SGS
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2009, 06:51:22 AM »

james, when do you need to retune the radio?  if you do it for say 20m, is it good for the whole band?  also, the same question goes for the antenna tuner.  do you adjust it everytime you change bands, or frequency, or what?  once i set it up for 20m, i just left it there, and just tuned up and down the band without changing anything.  it seemed to work pretty good that way, but i am not sure if it is the correct way. thanks
Logged
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2009, 06:42:37 PM »

hi Stephen,

depends on the band you are using and the antenna.

100khz on 20M you may want to tune again,
you can tune the top and bottom of the band and
see how it goes, you may not need to tune so often.

you can make a table of the drive/plate/load knob
settings so you can quickly change bands and then
touch up your settings.  

the chart is a big help when you are using an
external tuner.

73 james
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!