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Author Topic: Stolen Kenwood TH-F6A from Delta Airlines baggage  (Read 5045 times)
N3HIA
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Posts: 2




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« on: June 12, 2002, 05:04:14 PM »

I had my Kenwood TH-F6A handheld stolen from my checked luggage at BWI airport on May 12, 2002.  Delta refuses to accept responsibility for the item, since it is electronic in nature.

Serial Number: 30700290

Maryland Transportation Authority Police Report number: 02B011365.

Please be sure to declare your radio/electronic related items when you check baggage - even if they fight it.  (they required a firm demand to declare such items, even after this)  Funny how they won't take reponsibility for their own employee's actions - nor take corrective action.

Rick
N3HIA
richardhinkle@comcast.net
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K8YS
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Posts: 79


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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2002, 09:06:57 PM »

I do not work for Delta, but I have a very good friend that does... and he tells me that the most likey cause for loosing your radio was that the bag/luggage opened somewhere along the path from "check-in" to "baggage claim". You were not singled out of the masses, as the baggage gorillas do not have the time to check bags for treasures. If your radio did fall out, the baggage people "do thier best" to match up open bag to lost toys. If your radio did not have a name and address on it, they have no idea which bag it belonged to, and no, a call sign does not mean a thing to them.

After talking to my friend about this, I decided that from now on, I will use removable labels on all of my gear when it is packed, and sent thru checked luggage.
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WA4MJF
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Posts: 1003




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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2002, 05:13:57 PM »

If it did fall out and was found
it will turn up for sale in AL at
the lost baggage store.

73 de Ronnie
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N3HIA
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2002, 10:49:40 AM »

Sorry for the delay in reponse.  The radio did not "fall out" of the bag.  I had it wrapped inside clothing  in order to make it a damage-free trip.  My bag was "raped" and gone through in BWI airport.  When it arrived in Atlanta, the zipper of the case was run right through my shirt tail.  I have no question in my mind that this was as a result of a search of my bag - and of which, some scum decided that he could use my radio to make some money.  I had immediately reported the theft and if Delta had 'found' the item, they have a serial number, etc. to match the missing item to.  There would be no reason in the world for them to not return it to me if they found it.

Their baggage agent was callous, lazy and mentally challenged to boot.  I don't think they could find a missing radio if they tripped over it.

Sorry for the negativity, but their response to my issue has left me without faith in Delta's business values.  
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KF7IS
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2002, 03:47:08 PM »

The main problem (I was recently relieved of a lot of goodies) as I see it is that the average thief wants your goodies to exchange for money.  They have NO interest in operating the radio.  For that matter, the pawn shop that receives the radio couldn't care less whether or not the radio was password protected; the 10 or 20 dollars given to the thief will be returned during the sale of the radio to a novice, for which the novice will likely pay 50 dollars (before sending the unit to be "repaired".
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WV4I
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Posts: 136




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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2002, 05:50:05 AM »

As a pilot for a major US Airline, I can tell you that there is as good a possibility that your bag was opened for search as theft. The problem is that most of the 'searchers' that I've seen in action do not possess the motor skills to wrap a burger at McDonald's, much less repack your suitcase in a satisfactory manner,  if that is in fact what took place. And, up until recently, I hope no more, we've frequently had criminals, even convicted felons, doing the searching, not to mention the bag tossing/smashing.

You were right to report ANY missing item(s), and I would NOT allow myself to be ignored. In your case, I would start writing letters and/or emails to Leo Mullin, Delta's CEO. When there are/have been enough complaints about theft, etc., at a given location, sometimes a sting is set up by the airline and/or law enforcement. There is only an outside chance that you'd get get your radio back, but I'd be persistent as hell.

Good luck. I hope the hassle factor of commercial air travel in this country can be lessened/improved. I try to do my part every day I'm at work.
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W9DPY
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2002, 09:23:30 AM »

Don't expect the airlines as a whole to change, or become more responsible. This trend in American business is seeping into all sorts of services. A little less than two years ago, United Parcel Service declared that all firearms must be shipped highest priority overnight (very expensive). Why? Theft of firearms being shipped had increased to the point where the company was incuring huge losses and high customer complaints. The actual way to solve this is to find the employee/thief and proscute them. Instead, UPS just shifted the burden to the customer; typical of today's thinking. As an FYI, FedEx and DHL shortly followed UPS's lead. You wouldn't want businesses to worry to much about the customer, would you?
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W7DZN
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2002, 12:23:18 AM »

A little late for this suggestion by why not carry it on?  I have carried my HT, QRP rigs, and misc antenna equipment on many flights, including international flights, with no problem. Yes, at times my bags were subject to search at the security checkpoint and/or before boarding but there was never an issue with my ham gear.

Lou W7dzn
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WA0LSS
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2003, 06:19:49 PM »

Good comments all... here's what I've found:

No problem carrying on radios and HT's... I travel with both an FT100D and a HT... I do check the Outbacker antenna and mount since it looks a lot like a ski pole... I use a hard sided fishing rod case and foam padding on the antenna.

I have my FCC License (the small, wallet one) with me; was asked once and was glad I had it.

AND, I carry a cord that allows me to operate the FT100D on a cigarette lighter output (they actually have those at all the security areas to prove electronics work). I've been asked to turn it on about 1 time in 5. All in all the change to TSA has been a net improvement for this frequent flyer but I agree that many of the rules are damn silly.

Conclusion: Check the long pointy stuff and carry the rest on (Pelican Cases are wonderful).

Good luck and sorry about the lost rig.

Scott
WA0LSS

PS Keep after the b*st*rds at Delta... you may well win in the end
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KF8ZR
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2002, 07:33:22 PM »

Sometimes ya can't even trust the shipping departments in some companies. I had a radio shipped to my work and was told it would take a few days to get to me, well it only took one day so I didn't expect it for about 4 days, when I finally found it, it had been opened up by someone else in the MIS department in the building and it was addressed to me. I've had things shipped to my work before without any troubles, this time was really awful. Seems like amateur radio equipment is high theft material even if the drunks to try to steal it don't even know what it is.
It should be "lose" not "loose".
It should be "losing" not "loosing".
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W9WHE
Member

Posts: 254




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« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2002, 10:50:43 AM »


If you carry-on a radio, two possible problems:

A) the rubber duck will be viewed as a possible weapon, especially after X-ray shows a spring loaded "something" inside.

B) They will refuse to let you carry it on, putting you in a very difficult position. After all, a tall, blond haired, blue eyed, light skinned, no-accent traveler could be a terrorist!

Now, I can't imagine WHY the airlines are in such dire straights!
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N2QMT
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2002, 01:11:20 PM »

     I travel frequently and I ALWAYS carry my radio on.  In fact, I travel as light as possible and rarely check my baggage.  Even with heightened security measure, I have never had a problem carrying on an HT. Once I was asked to turn it on (same with my cell phone and PDA) and that was the extent of it.  A rubber duck is not on any list of prohibited items so that shouldn't be an issue.  

     On an aside, I once had an extra stylus for my PDA confiscated because it was a "potential weapon".  I spoke to the supervisor and it was returned to me because I asked to see the prohibited item list.

     Sorry to hear about the loss though Sad

John
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KO6UJ
Member

Posts: 14




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« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2002, 07:18:57 PM »

Sorry to hear about the loss.

Yes, airlines are notorious, when it comes to taking responsibility for the actions of their employees. Delta and Alaska (especially) are the worst through personal experience.

To all hams I would recommend placing all portable eletronics in carry-on luggage. If it's too large to take, then don't take it or ship it before hand.

Good luck

73 - Guy
KO7UJ
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KL7IPV
Member

Posts: 984




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« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2002, 05:35:57 PM »

The new "leave them unlocked" luggage rules should really make the airlines wondering. What will the FEDs do next to help the kill the airline business? And still the cry of profiling comes up. I am sorry, if a person of middle eastern descent caused the problems we have; searching old ladies won't stop the trouble. Leaving bags unlocked won't do it either. Common sense could go a long way toward that end though. Suppose anyone thought of that yet? I haven't seen any signs of it.
73
Frank
KL7IPV
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K8LEA
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Posts: 69


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« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2003, 05:01:28 PM »

IMHO,  the "leave 'em unlocked" rule is a little silly, but let's not delude ourselves.  The locks generally are only good enough to keep the bag from popping open and deter the casual thief.  Somebody who really wants in a bag is going to get in - all he needs is the time and a tool.

And, many keys  are "one key fits everything"....   My whole family has Samsonite luggage, and I've got two of their briefcases too, and one key opens all of them....  Serious thieves have these keys already.

The real solution is tomaintain the honesty of the baggage handlers and inspectors, and strip search the terrorists, not the law abiding citizens....

Stu.
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