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Author Topic: JOE ROBIN - SCAM ARTIST  (Read 11272 times)
AD6KA
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Posts: 2237




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« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2010, 11:03:41 AM »

By K0OD
"It's fun to hear these thickly-accented crooks attempt to explain why they need a 500 pound order air expressed 5,000 miles. I'll put them on hold to get "our security officer's approval." They're always gone when I return to the phone."

Heh, funny stuff! I bet they want to charge it on a credit card too, huh? One with the name "Esther Smith" but it's being shipped to care of
some unpronouncable name.

How stupid do they think we are?
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K0OD
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« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2010, 05:55:33 PM »

"How stupid do they think we are?"
---
Ken, occurs to me that some of those "foot soldiers" spewing emails to us are likely fraud victims themselves.

Lured by stories of easy riches to be made scamming "dumb Westerners," gullible Africans may be purchasing what amounts to fraud franchises. They pay cash to get computer time and a few milked-out pidgin-English scripts.  Certainly the Internet cafes of West Africa benefit from promoting that myth.  

If there are riches to be made, why are these scams confined to a very few nations?  There are no "Bolivian Letter Scams" or "Cook Islands Advanced Fee Frauds."  

When I win four lotteries in a day, or inherit $40 million TWICE before I have breakfast, I too wonder whether ANY westerner still falls for this carbon-copy nonsense. (I picture Lagos-versions of Don Knotts and Tim Conway pecking away)

Is there thinking in the "baiter community" (LOL) that the main victims of email scams nowadays are the Africans who send them?
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AD6KA
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« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2010, 07:16:31 PM »

"Is there thinking in the "baiter community" (LOL) that the main victims of email scams nowadays are the Africans who send them?"

No. But in the baiter community, the check mules and re-shippers are considered victims. They are breaking the law but are usually unaware of what they are actually doing.

Re-shippers are people who respond to a work-at-home
advertisement. The "work" is receiving and reshipping merchandise....purchased by scammers with stolen credit cards. Of course the re-shippers think it's just a job....until they get caught.

Check mules (verses check scam victims) are another "work at home" scheme. They actually receive GOOD checks/wire transfers/Western Union transfers from the scammer's real victims. The funds are then deposited and the check mule sends on the funds somewhere else, usually an overseas bank. It's money laundering and it's a serious crime, whether you are aware of what you are doing or not.

You'd think "Only an idiot would fall for something like that, or not realize what's going on". Yes and no. Most of the time mules and re-shippers are themselves victims of a "Sweetheart Scam". They fall in love with someone over the Internet. Then this person starts to ask them for favors. "My cousin in your country needs a laptop, I'm having it shipped to you, please forward it to him for me". A good Sweetheart Scammer is very patient and very smooth, often waiting 6 months to a year before asking for "favors" or "business". They get to know their victims, keep records of family members (How is your Uncle in Tulsa? Doesn't your daughter have a birthday soon?) which reinforces to the victim that the scammer REALLY cares. By this time the other person, usually (but not always) someone socially awkward or emotionally vulnerable, is hopelessly in love and hooked.
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AD6KA
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« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2010, 09:24:56 AM »

Wow!  This sounds like a whole "underworld" complete with nicknames.

Oh yeah, big time. Just a few:

MUGU: Scam victim, literally "bog fool" in Igbo, a Nigerian dialect.

MAGA: Victim, interchangeable with Mugu.

Guyman: The low level guys in the scam organization who sit in the Net Cafe's
             all day sending and answering emails. They are not usually very skilled,
             and only get paid a percentage of what the final damages to the victim are.
             If they think they've got a "live one", they're passed on to someone with
             better skills/more experienced.

The OGA: The boss who organizes the ring. He pays for the cafe time, any
              fake documents that need to be created, opens bank accounts, etc.
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K0OD
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« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2010, 08:47:21 PM »

hey muguman i dey here oooooooooooooooooo

Or as hams would say, the frequency is in use.

----------------
Actually I think that lingo is no longer in use. But you'd see it all over open guestbooks and discussion boards several years ago.
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AD6KA
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« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2010, 03:33:51 PM »

Reply to the scam letter with this:

MUMU, U DEY DI POOR WASHAYO IDIOT DIRT-MONKEY FOOL, OK?

419 NOT DI JOB 4 DI SMALL BOI LIKE U NA BETTER U STEP BACK IN
UR MAMAS DIRTY 5 NAIRA INFECTED TOTO. OOOOOOOOO!

IN FACT, BETTER U HANG URSELF NAU INSTEAD U NA UR WHOLE FAMILY
GO REMAIN FOR POVERTY FOREVER.
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WB2EOD
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« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2010, 07:18:18 AM »

I have received various fraudulent emails over the years. I see them more as entertainment than anything else.  The most ridiculous I've ever received would have to be the "death threat". 
The intended victim receives an email stating that there is a contract on his/her life.  The victim is then supposed to transfer money in accordance with instructions provided at which time the contract will be cancelled. 
Very creative, targets the gullible AND the paranoid.
 
 
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W3LK
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« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2010, 04:05:46 PM »

I have received various fraudulent emails over the years. I see them more as entertainment than anything else.  The most ridiculous I've ever received would have to be the "death threat". 
The intended victim receives an email stating that there is a contract on his/her life.  The victim is then supposed to transfer money in accordance with instructions provided at which time the contract will be cancelled. 
Very creative, targets the gullible AND the paranoid.
 
 

The word for that is extortion and is a felony is virtually every country in the world. Getting a conviction, even if the sender is identified, would be iffy if they are not in the same country as the recipient. Smiley
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
N0SYA
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« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2011, 08:21:55 AM »

In response to an ad I'd placed, Mr Robin responded via an email asking to purchase my "item" and how he wished the transaction to proceed. I responded via email with links to the various ham forum threads where his name is the thread topic, saying I thought he should know. He has yet to respond.
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2011, 06:44:52 PM »

i had experience with this type of scam too... was selling my car on some free classifieds online.. for $500.. (Tells you a lot about the car)

this guy REALLLLLLY wanted my car.. and wanted it shipped overseas... wanted to send me stupid amount of money and wire him the remainders.. I said 'no'  send me the correct amount, or go elsewhere.
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