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Author Topic: Stealth Antenna Help  (Read 595 times)
KD7PPH
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Posts: 21




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« on: May 29, 2002, 07:40:42 PM »

I live in a townhouse with CC&Rs.  The roof on my garage is flat, so I was going to build a G5RV JR and string it across the roof diagnally.  This is before I knew that the ladder line is supposted to hang straight from the dipole.  I have also realized that my garage is not that big.  Several questions 1)  Can I hang the antenna horizontal or as a horizontal Vee and have the ladderline horizontal also? 2) If so, what kind of pattern would this give me? 3) Any other suggestions for stealth antennas?  Note: Homes are very close, no trees, and neighbors are CC&R Nazis. Many thanks.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20612




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« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2002, 11:01:19 AM »

Depends on what bands you're looking to cover.

If you can live with just 30-20-17-15-12-10 meters, and forget about 40m and below, I've found nothing small and unobtrusive that works as well as a high-Q loop antenna, such as the MFJ-1786.  It's amazing for its diminutive size, and doesn't look like an antenna.  Its feedline can be routed any way you wish, and it requires no antenna tuner because it auto-tunes to resonance, with a control box in the shack (the "tuner" is actually built into the antenna itself).

If you're really interested in working 40/80 meters, a better choice than the G5RV stretched across the garage roof would likely be a "loop" antenna, made of insulated wire, following the entire perimeter of the garage.  That will provide more surface area (aperture) for the antenna, to improve its efficiency at lower frequencies compared with the G5RV, and using twin lead (ladder line might be objectionable because of its size) to feed it, with a manual tuner in the shack, a loop works well on several bands, and is a reasonable performer even when installed fairly low to the ground.

You might pick up the ARRL book on "stealth antennas," it's very good and can be ordered via their website for immediate delivery.

WB2WIK/6
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KF4ZGZ
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Posts: 286


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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2002, 06:18:07 AM »

Actually, the ladderline doesn't have to be at a right angle. Yes, that would be optimum, but it will work as long as the ladderline isn't perpindicular to the dipole. One thing to remember about building antennas...there isn't many absolutes! Each situation is different and what may work here, might not work there and vice versa.

73 and Good Luck de Matt, kf4zgz

"The best antenna is the one you build yourself!"
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N4UM
Member

Posts: 477




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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2002, 02:39:18 PM »

A horizontal loop around the perimeter of the garage fed with ladder line should work fairly well for you. I used a similar antenna inside a small apartment. It was 8 feet above ground level. My loop was about 30 feet long and 12 feet wide.  I was able to make a fair number of contacts with it on 30 meters and above. I'd recommend that you consider getting on PSK-31 if you have a computer available.  That mode worked very well for me running about ten watts to my indoor loop. I work lots of stations on PSK who are in restricted settings and they seem to have good luck with low power and clandestine antennas.
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