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Author Topic: Lower an antenna mast into a well?  (Read 573 times)
W4XKE
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Posts: 66




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« on: May 19, 2004, 08:27:49 PM »

I keep looking at the unused well head outside my house and toy with an idea of using it to raise & lower an antenna mast.  Since the well is 210 feet deep, the mast wouldn't have to be telescopic.  The well casing is 6" dia. Is this a feasible idea?  I'm trying to imagine how I could winch it in and out with a cable and pulley.  It would have a good ground, but the water might be kind of rough on the paint though.  Any thoughts?  (Maybe I just have too much time on my hands and get into trouble thinking... HI HI)  Johnny, W4XKE
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N5EIL
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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2004, 10:25:05 PM »

Cool Idea, never thought of doing something like that, but I don't have well either! first what type of antenna do you plan on using? this could change a lot.

N5EIL, Neil  
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N3BIF
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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2004, 11:26:43 AM »

     How far down is the water table ? That is how far can the antenna system be lowered before it would hit the water ?  Being that you have a 200 foot well my guess would be that the water is at least 175 feet down or there would be no need to have drilled that far.
    I would think that a winch and cable with several rollers/guides would do the trick. The feedline though would be subject to a lot of flexing , scrapeing etc unless you would disconnect it.
     Seems like one of those "Ok so now that I have built it ,so what " ideas.  
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2004, 12:39:19 PM »

Well, a 6" well casing won't support anything larger than a 5" or so O.D. mast, which will have insufficient strength to be self-supporting for much height above ground; so the obstacle will be how to bracket or guy that mast at about 20' above ground and then still have that support mechanism give way or release for retraction back into the well.

Or, maybe you just want a 20' long mast that retracts into the ground!  (I can't offhand think of "why," but that's another issue...)

WB2WIK/6
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2004, 08:48:31 PM »

hi johnny,

How about using your well for geothermal
heat/cool of your home ?

With the money you save on the power/gas co.
you could put up a nice tower or two !

73 james
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W4XKE
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« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2004, 09:49:24 PM »

Well, TNX fellas (PUN).  Seriously, I appreciate your comments and given your thoughts, have decided to place an iron hand pump on the well head and plant some marigolds around it.  To answer a couple of questions, the water table keeps the static level of the water at 21' but when it is being pumped, the level would naturally drop somewhat.  (That's what the great depth is for... to supply the volume required to keep the level from dropping below the usable depth.  Geothermal is a bit more ambitious a project than I want to get into.  Again, thanks for your thoughts, Respectfully, Johnny W4XKE
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KD7EVS
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« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2004, 03:33:09 PM »

I've often thought the same thing with my 'dream' missle silo house.   Smiley
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KA0GKT
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« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2004, 06:24:09 PM »

Other than the self supporting problems, I think that your state's water quality board might have a thing or two t osay about putting something foreign down into the well.

Now, as far as geo-thermal goes.  A water-source heat pump can cool and heat your house quite well (PUN intended)  Whether you recharge through another well or use the water to keep your garden green throughout the summer is another thing entirely.  For wintertime heating, a recharge system would be best.  If you already have another water well, consider using the 200' one for recharge purposes.  If you are on a rural or city water system, consider visiting an irrigation supplier for a submersible pump which you can use to water the daisies (and keep the ground plane under that vertical nice and conductive) without spinning the old water-meter.

I wish I had a good water well on my property.  It'd make running the Ol' swanp cooler and keeping my wife's plants green a whole lot easier (and less expensive to boot) in the Old Pueblo.

73

de KA0GKT/7
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