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Author Topic: HUSTLER 4BTV vs. HY-GAIN 14AVQ  (Read 2984 times)
K3ASA
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Posts: 137




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« on: May 06, 2006, 11:13:04 AM »

Steve, (AND others..)  I know you will have a GOOD answer for me, or at least I hope so. I am trying to decide which of the 2 verticals noted above will be best for DX.  I dont care much about the 80M band, so either should serve my purpose. I have read most of the reviews and the big thing seems to the the Quality Control problems at Hy-Gain.  I am leaning toward the Hustler.. With an equal amount of radials, ground mount, would the performance probably be about the same for these two? One better than the other??  THANKS in advance for your replies! 73, de K3ASA, Gene
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K3GM
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Posts: 1826




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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2006, 12:44:35 PM »

Hello Gene.  I've owned both.  Up to a year ago, it was the Hustler and many years ago the HyGain, when they were HyGain.  I preferred the Hustler.  It's put together very well, although I wasn't crazy over the pigtail affair of connecting the coax.  I have an extensive radial field and had some problems initially with tuning it.  With the big radial field, I had lowered the input impedance at the antenna to a point where I had a significant mismatch between the antenna, and the 50 ohm coax.  I think Hustler sets up their antenna assuming that the user is going to bang a pipe in the ground, mount it to it, and go to town while ignoring the need for a radial field.  The ground losses give a good match, but do nothing except heat the ground around the antenna.  But once I got that problem solved, it played very well working VK's and ZL's on 40 running 5 watts from New England. I took it down and sold it at Dayton last year, going to a ground mounted auto tuner and a tree hung, vertical wire for 40 and 80.  I prefer this to the trapped vertical.  Just a little more money, but perfect loading across both bands.  You might want to consider this method as well because the 80 meter resonator on either brand gives you, what, 25kHz?  With the autotuner you can operate anywhere on 75 or 80 and with certain models, even on 160.

With a good radial field, a vertical will be a noisy antenna and it should be.  You will be receiving a low angle, omnidirectional pattern.  A quiet vertical has a problem.  Good luck with your decision.
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W6OP
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Posts: 342




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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2006, 05:31:24 PM »

I have the Hustler 6BTV with lots of radials and it works pretty good. It is noisier than my dipole but it's kind of 50-50 which one works best at any time. On thing about the Hustler is it is easy to modify to also cover 17m and 12m.

Pete W6OP
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K5LXP
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2006, 06:29:11 AM »

 K3GM wrote:

> I had a significant mismatch between
> the antenna, and the 50 ohm coax.
...
>  But once I got that problem solved,


How did you solve it?

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2006, 08:49:02 AM »

>RE: HUSTLER 4BTV vs. HY-GAIN 14AVQ       Reply
by K5LXP on May 8, 2006    Mail this to a friend!
K3GM wrote:

> I had a significant mismatch between
> the antenna, and the 50 ohm coax.
...
> But once I got that problem solved,


How did you solve it?

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM<

::I wondered that, too.  I have a pretty good radial system under my 6BTV and simply adjusted all the element lengths (tubing between the traps) for resonance in the bands, and then "fine tuned" the antenna using the radials themselves (trimmed to length).  My roof tower, on which the 6BTV is located, makes it easy to tilt the antenna over (in about ten seconds), make an adjustment, and then tilt it back up.  

Having made those adjustments, my 6BTV Hustler "loads up" perfectly, VSWR = 1.0 in the center of each band, and rising from there.  80m bandwidth is very, very narrow, but the other bands are pretty good.

WB2WIK/6
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K3GM
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Posts: 1826




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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2006, 09:29:50 AM »

I solved it by adding about 1.5 uH of inductance in the form of a small coil at the base of the antenna.  I did the tubing cutting route, but was running out of material on the short sections. I have nearly 5000 feet of wire in my unburied radials.  I measured the input impedance with my cheapo Autek RF-1, and it was around 32 ohms.  The coil solved it, but resulted in a narrowed bandwidth on 40; around 100kHz.  I have pix of the mod if you like to see it.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1826




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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2006, 10:06:42 AM »

...make that inductance from the base of the radiator to the grounded frame.
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WA1RNE
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Posts: 833




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« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2006, 10:21:31 AM »

 Tom,


 
 Sounds like you may have a problem with the 40 meter trap......
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K3GM
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Posts: 1826




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« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2006, 12:36:21 PM »

Chris, a bad trap was the first thing I suspected.  But when I disconnected the radial field from the antenna and used only the lightning ground, I got a good match and the advertised bandwidths.  I had tuning problems everywhere with the radial field connected.  The little coil fixed all 5 bands, but 40 was narrowed dramatically.
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WN8R
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 06:34:12 AM »

The Hustler Trap Verticals have no 40 meter trap.
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K3ASA
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Posts: 137




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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2006, 06:59:31 AM »

Well, I ordered the 4BTV yesterday.  I will ground mount and give it a shot with 4 radials per band.  Hustler says 2 per, I believe.  I am sure I will probably be adding more, but will try it out with 4.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1826




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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2006, 12:08:11 PM »

Gene, if you ground mount the antenna, radial length is unimportant.  So, you don't need to cut precise 1/4 wave radials for each band.  If you can lay down 16-36 radials, you should get pretty good performance without running into the problems I experienced. Just remember to mount it low to the ground; no more than a few inches.  A radial plate like the DX Engineering plate is a great way to tie all of the radials together, and to the coax shield.  The majority of my radial are 32' long, but I have several dozen that are 64' long installed mostly for experimentation. Let us know how it works.
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K3ASA
Member

Posts: 137




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« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2006, 03:29:13 PM »

Thanks for the info..  I DID buy the radial plate from DX Engineering.......  Looked like a MUCH better and easier way of securing the radials!  Everything has been shipped, and hopefully, next weekend I will have it up and running. THANKS and 73, Gene
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KA3NXN
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Posts: 109


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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2006, 08:51:11 AM »

Hygain, Ameritron, Vectronics. Look at where they are made. Starkville, MS. To me this is a foul 3 letter word, MFJ, which in any language translates to garbage. STAY AWAY!!!!

I tell you this from a proud & very happy owner of a 5BTV and more importantly an MFJ free shack.


Oh yea and if you like I can make a copy of one of the pages of my log book where NONE of the calls that were logged were stateside calls. I'd say that DX is good. I can also tell you that the 5BTV is installed in not the best place for an antenna installation, but hey it works. Oh yea I also did the 17&12 meter mods for this antenna and these bands also works very very well.

Good luck

Jaime-KA3NXN
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