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Author Topic: Beam without a rotor  (Read 486 times)
KC8LIM
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« on: September 27, 2007, 08:15:46 PM »

I have a 5 band beam : 28, 24, 21, 18, 14
(mosley TA-33M-WARC)

It will be awhile before I can get a rotor and nessacary hardware to mount the rotor.

I would like to mount this antenna on my tower so I can get some sort of use out of it untill I get a rotor.

I realize this kind of defeats the purpose of having a beam.

If I end up installing it, what direction should I direct it?

Thanks,
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N3OX
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2007, 08:50:12 PM »

The places you want to work the most :-)

If it's DX you're after, at this point in the solar cycle, on those bands (20 and 17 being the only open ones), you'll probably want to keep it on Europe... maybe split the difference between Europe and Africa so you can get Europe, Africa, and the Middle East OK.

South America /Carribean is usually strong enough that you'll work some of them anyway.

You'll miss the stuff to the back... probably Australia, New Zealand, etc.  


Pointing straight north is the best from a "putyour power where the toughest DX is" standpoint, but except on days when the flux is up a bit and the A and K indices are both zero, it won't be much fun.

Honestly, though, it is going to drive you nuts to have a fixed beam.  

Dan
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
KB9CRY
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2007, 06:54:56 AM »

Point it at 90 degrees.  This will allow entry into EU, AF, and the Carribean.  You can also supplement other directions with wire dipoles, etc.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2007, 09:08:56 AM »

I wouldn't do this.

No matter what direction you pick, it will be the wrong one.

How high is the tower?

Can you mount the beam so it freewheels and tie it off with a rope to a nearby tree, fence post or something?  That way, you could walk around in the yard holding the end of the rope, steer the beam in the direction you want, and then tie the rope off to hold the beam in that direction.

This doesn't work well on a 100' tower!  However, it does work pretty well on a shorter one, like 40-50'.

WB2WIK/6
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WW5AA
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2007, 12:13:15 PM »

Get inovative, my first beam was turned with an electric prop pitch motor that couldn't be yellow tagged but still worked fine(1/10 of the cost of a heavy duty ham rotor at the time). Built a rotor for a Tech friends 6 meter beam last year using a windshield wiper motor (total cost $22). Where there is a will there is a way!

73, de Lindy
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2007, 01:30:05 PM »

The best bet on rotators is one of Norm's rebuilt jobs with warrantee.

Oh, that's Norm Rotor Service, do a Google search.
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2007, 06:37:32 PM »

And there are more licensed stations to your east than to your west or south.
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WK0F
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Posts: 46




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« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2007, 07:41:43 PM »

I once had a beam with the mast outside of my bedroom window.  I had a steering wheel attached at the bottom of the mast and when I wanted to point the beam in a different direction, I opened the wndow and turned the steering wheel.  It's what the old timers called "The Armstrong Method".
73,
Terry, W0ZS
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