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Author Topic: New Broadband speed record  (Read 320 times)
W8JX
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« on: Today at 05:29:40 AM »

Bell labs has recently announced that they have been able to get 10gbit/s over copper wire and not fiber. Telcos have been searching for a use of old telco wires and cable deployed to 10's of millions of homes for high speed broad band without having to install expensive fiber. No word on when it may reach the average consumer. It beats Google home fiber access by 10 fold.
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KB3VWG
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« Reply #1 on: Today at 06:56:28 AM »

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1323028

I've been wondering for years what would happened to the telecos' copper infrastructure...in my area, they won't service copper, they force you to get FiOS if your copper fails. The same happened on a large scale in NYC after Hurricane Sandy, so much for the notion of Universal Service (http://spectrum.ieee.org/podcast/telecom/wireless/lost-in-america-still-no-phone-service-after-hurricane-sandy).

Now it's clear, they's incentive to keep and maintain the copper infrastructure...perhaps alot of those in NYC will be able to get landlines again, or have a choice other than the cable provider for phone/Internet service.
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N0SYA
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« Reply #2 on: Today at 07:21:15 AM »

I'm sure it's rf quiet, just like bpl.
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
N8AUC
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« Reply #3 on: Today at 02:19:25 PM »

10 Gbps over an unshielded copper phone line?

I'm afraid N0SYA is right on this one.
That's going to radiate signal like crazy. And conversely, it's going to be susceptible to all kinds of external RFI.

Drive down the street, key your mobile rig, and take out internet service for several homes at a time.

Sure. What could POSSIBLY go wrong with that idea?

I thought the guys at Bell Labs were smarter than that.
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WA2CWA
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« Reply #4 on: Today at 02:51:58 PM »

I thought the guys at Bell Labs were smarter than that.


Conquering the challenge is also very important. Once you've done that, then you massage it and see if you can make some practical use out of the results.

Pete, wa2cwa
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KF6QEX
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« Reply #5 on: Today at 03:15:49 PM »

Bell labs has recently announced that they have been able to get 10gbit/s over copper wire and not fiber. Telcos have been searching for a use of old telco wires and cable deployed to 10's of millions of homes for high speed broad band without having to install expensive fiber. No word on when it may reach the average consumer. It beats Google home fiber access by 10 fold.

Not excited yet.
It makes me wonder how long their copper wire was......


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AA4PB
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« Reply #6 on: Today at 04:12:41 PM »

"It makes me wonder how long their copper wire was......"

10Gbps requires 2 pairs and works a maximum distance of 30 Meters
2Gbps requires 1 pair and works a maximum distance of 70 Meters

Its intended use is for the curb to residence connection for fiber systems in lieu of digging up the yard to bury fiber all the way to the house.


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G8YMW
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« Reply #7 on: Today at 04:20:56 PM »

That was what I was wondering as I know the speed bottleneck is the copper.
Hence fibreoptic. As AA4PB says copper from the box on the street corner to the house.
Fibreoptic cables can carry more signals than copper and as it is light, it is interference proof along its length.
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W8JX
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« Reply #8 on: Today at 04:27:41 PM »

"It makes me wonder how long their copper wire was......"

10Gbps requires 2 pairs and works a maximum distance of 30 Meters
2Gbps requires 1 pair and works a maximum distance of 70 Meters

Its intended use is for the curb to residence connection for fiber systems in lieu of digging up the yard to bury fiber all the way to the house.


They call it XG Fast which is improved G Fast. XG use a 500mhz bandwidth vs G which uses 106 MHz. G has a longer range with reduced throughput. It is basically a DSL protocol. No word yet on whether G or XG would be viable at a few mile at a rate of say 50 mbit or so
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AA4PB
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« Reply #9 on: Today at 04:41:32 PM »

You also don't have to be so concerned with lightning strikes with fiber optic cables since they are non conductive. Comcast in my area now has fiber to the pole and then uses coax to the house. I expect that is because 1) many houses are already wired with coax to the pole and 2) fiber is easier to damage by the homeowner unless it is buried deep.

One of the issues I used to run in to with DSL (and even the faster dial up speeds) was that local phone companies didn't maintain their old analog phone wiring very well. Most wire closets and cross boxes are a "rats nest" of unmarked wires going every which way. They push the wires into the box and close the door. An un-terminated stub running half a mile doesn't matter to analog systems but it creates a lot of reflections and data errors with digital transmissions.

I recently changed my home phone service over to the cable provider because the service from the phone company was getting so poor. Every time it rained I had hum and noise on the line so bad that you could hardly hear. They would clear it up (probably by switching to a different pair) but the next time it rained it came back. The lines in my area were installed about 30 years ago.

« Last Edit: Today at 04:46:43 PM by AA4PB » Logged
W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: Today at 05:40:01 PM »

You also don't have to be so concerned with lightning strikes with fiber optic cables since they are non conductive. Comcast in my area now has fiber to the pole and then uses coax to the house. I expect that is because 1) many houses are already wired with coax to the pole and 2) fiber is easier to damage by the homeowner unless it is buried deep.

They use fiber on pole for greater bandwidth on node but there really is no need for added cost to use fiber to house right now as the cable drop can have a lot of bandwidth.
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KF6QEX
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« Reply #11 on: Today at 06:32:04 PM »

"It makes me wonder how long their copper wire was......"

10Gbps requires 2 pairs and works a maximum distance of 30 Meters
2Gbps requires 1 pair and works a maximum distance of 70 Meters

Its intended use is for the curb to residence connection for fiber systems in lieu of digging up the yard to bury fiber all the way to the house.


How does that solve the problem of bringing high speed to the "curb" which is what the problem with DSL has been all along?

Something smells a  little bit like smoke and mirrors
I could get DSL at any speed although 2 houses up the street did have it.
So I went with cable and now I have 100 Mb download and 10Mb  upload. 

Still not excited for 10Gb over copper at a distance of 30 meters.

 

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