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Author Topic: VX-150 programming  (Read 615 times)
KEITHWIRED
Member

Posts: 13




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« on: January 04, 2006, 08:25:37 AM »

can somebody help me with programming of my vx-150 portable vertex radio

I need to switch when the ANI sends to after I let go of the PTT button. Right now its defaulted to send the ANI as soon as I press the PTT button but I need it to be opposite. Anyone think they can help me?
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KB1LKR
Member

Posts: 1898




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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2006, 07:19:46 PM »

What's ANI?

de Steve -- KB1LKR
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KB1LKR
Member

Posts: 1898




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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2006, 07:30:21 PM »

found it (in a VX-170 manual, under DTMF Pager Operation -- w/ optional FTD7 module, but not in the VX-150 manual): Automatic Number Identification. Alas for the VX-170 it appears that it only sends the ANI on PTT press, not on PTT release. Sorry not to be of more help.

73

de Steve - KB1LKR
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KEITHWIRED
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2006, 07:37:36 PM »

damn...theres no way to read the image file firmware on the radio and edit it?  I know theres programming tools but is there a way to edit the firmware itself?
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N3ZKP
Member

Posts: 2008




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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2006, 09:07:46 AM »

Probably can't be done.

For the life of me I don't understand some of you so-called volunteer firefighters. You won't spend a $150  to buy a radio (there are PLENTY on the used market at this price) that works correctly with your department's system, but you'll butcher a perfectly good ham HT. Do you skimp on the other tools of your trade also?

I consider putting your life a risk with a radio that wasn't designed to do what you want it to in the same category as wearing a raincoat and boots from the Dollar Store instead of proper turnout gear and putting a wet rag over your face instead of wearing an AirPac in a smoke-filled building.

Then again, it is YOUR life.

Lon

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KEITHWIRED
Member

Posts: 13




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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2006, 12:21:14 PM »

butcher? I have done nothing that will harm the radio. The radio has the ability to receive from about 120ish to 180ish give or take but guess who stops it from doing that. The FCC, they slap on a nice hefty extra fee for that which is totally useless because theres no extra money they need to spend in allowing a radio to tx/rx in a larger range. They just want to take as much money as possible from the consumer, i dont remember the model number but there is another vertex radio that has the exact same internals minus the one resistor that the vx-150 has yet sells for almost 100-120 more then the vx-150, its not worth being "legal", I'm not going to get stepped all over by the FCC and conned into paying more money when it doesnt cost them anymore money. In fact, it costs them nothing to allow me to tx/rx on a larger range, it all just goes into their pockets. I need a secondary radio for responding to the fire building, all of our turnout gear and scbas have radios on them we just cant take them off
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N3ZKP
Member

Posts: 2008




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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2006, 02:19:28 PM »

Actually, the FCC has nothing to do with the pricing of radios and your rationale for illegal activity is pathetic, just as is the rationale of every illegal activity.

73,

Lon - N3ZKP
Baltimore, Maryland
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KC0VCU
Member

Posts: 138




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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2006, 11:17:44 PM »

actually the vx800 has some significantly different internals, as it is not set up to be programmed via a front pannel, and is not set up to operate in a vfo mode, as the 110 can. The vx-110 is a closer match though.

That said, if you have removed the resistor that opens the rig up to listen to the wider band than it comes from the factory with, I am affraid that you will get a variety of responses here, including some very negative ones.

In all honesty, considering the cost of the equipment, you are probably better off picking up a used Saber, Radius, or MT1000 off of e-bay. I won't claim that any of them are infaliable radios, but one of those, the appropriate programing software, and cables, and you will spend a lot less than you would attempting to reprogram the firmware of a vx-150 to put the ANI at the release of a PTT button, vs the press of it.

Can the re-programming be done? I don't know, I have not heard of anyone who has done so.

If all you need is a radio that can listen to the local public safety channels, so you know where to respond, you would be far better served with a Pro-83 scanner from Radio Shack. It costs less, scanns faster, and can act as a weather alert radio as well.  I suggest this because it sounds like the equipment you get at the fire-station is the equipment you need on the job, and what you are looking for is just a way to keep track of what you need to do to get to the job. That may not require that you be able to transmit, and you may be able to get your responses in via a cell phone call, or even through an auto-patch on a ham repeater if you have a radio that can listen to the appropriae frequencies.

Though with that requirement you could probably get away with a stock vx-150. You might be able to work with a vx110 as well, though you would want to pre-program the appropriate dtmf codes. You would want to only program in a couple of local repeaters, and the  output frequencies for the local public safety channels that you need, then scanning should be fast enough.

Hey, I don't expect anything above will have changed your mind. I happen to think your best bet is to work with your local agencies to figure out a way to pick up some used Radius, MT1000, or Saber radios, get them programmed as necessary, and get a couple of batteries and a charger for each of the volunteers. In the long term I think that is going to be less expensive for everyone involved. Of course a used Saber may be newer than the equipment that the people you are helping may be using. The other advantage to the above is that you can use one of those radios on the ham repeaters, or to chat with friends via MURS. It just requires that the rig be programmed appropriately.

73

-Rusty - kc0vcu
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