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Author Topic: Apple Computers  (Read 1375 times)
AD5GX
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Posts: 8




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« on: April 11, 2003, 12:09:20 AM »

I am looking at making the switch to Apple.  But one question remains: is there adequate ham radio software for that platform?  Can you direct me to a website that will start me in a good direction researching this matter?

Thanks de AD5GX
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K0HZI
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Posts: 470




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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2003, 08:17:13 PM »

There is software for Macintosh: http://www.blackcatsystems.com/software/ham.html
But far more for Windows.
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KB0NLY
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2003, 06:12:38 AM »

I think that you will find that there is a far better supply of software for the PC, that is windows based software.  However you could have your apple and cake in the same box, they do make software that runs on a Mac creating a virtual Windows environment to run Windows based software.  The name of the software eludes me at the moment because i hardly have anything to do with a Mac, but i have friend that runs it on his Mac Laptop and he loves it.  Still cant think of the name of it, will have to ask him the next time i get a chance.

73,

Scott, KB0NLY

AKA: The Computer Doctor

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KD1S
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2003, 04:32:26 PM »

I have to disagree with KB0NLY on this one. Stick with the PC has so much more software available for it than the Macintosh does.

An emulator kind of defeats the purpose. And hardware wise, there is no longer anything special about Apple hardware, the same things are also available on PC's.

If you're buying into their "Switch" ads which I note they've pulled, it's baloney. My Windows 2000 PC doesn't crash, period. Sure I restart it when I update drivers and such but you do the same thing on a Mac. And I note that I can crash a G4 running OS/X - just fire up a few CPU intensive graphic rendering programs - goodbye!

PC's nowadays ROCK! I'm running Flash MX, Swift 3D, PhotoShop and my packet stuff on an older AMD K62-500 CPU, 384MB RAM and 45GB of disk with a CD burner and a Zip drive. Oh and email, and Usenet and web browsing and so on. How much did I pay for this wonder system? Less than $700. Built it myself of course.

Average Imac now goes for about $1300, for that much you can get a PC that'll blow the doors off that Imac.

So don't do it - get a PC instead. And on a PC you have your choice of real operating systems. Smiley

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KC2FPR
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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2003, 10:10:17 PM »

I use both cutting edge pcs and macs.  There is TONS more ham software for PC's.  But you have to decide what you really want to do with your computer.  The current macs are way more stable (note: OS X backbone is unix)then pcs, sorry they are period (I can multask running 3 different os at same time during very intense graphic work on a G3 no less and not crash) .   The first week I had my newest PC (HP) it crashed using XP more times then my first mac ever did to date!!  I do mostly video editing.  I use an ibook when I'm on scene.  It renders video faster then my newest pc.  Yes macs are more expensive, much more.  My last pc cost 1\3 price of my last apple.  Now if you will be doing much with digital modes go with pc hands down.  But for logging and NON-INTERFACED modes, the mac hands down.  You spend more time using mac and less time troubleshooting a windows machine.  VIRTUAL PC is the software emulator that will run windows on a mac.  I'm not sure how good the hardware interface between radio and machine would be.  Again if you do lost of digital modes PC, everything else MAC.  Or better yet, get both.  Buy a mac and build your on pc and get a FREE education.  Bottom line they are both good, PCs faster for the money, MACS more expensive but VERY stable (osx).  Both easy to learn.  Good luck and have fun.
KC2FPR
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KB0NLY
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2003, 10:23:51 PM »

Isn't that what i just said?

I definitely wasn't urging anyone to buy a Mac, far from it, just pointing out that emulators are available if you wish to do so.  PC based software is plentiful compared to any other platform.

I wouldn't ever give up my AMD Athlon XP 2.16GHz running Windows XP Professional for a Mac (or apple if you prefer).

73,

Scott, KB0NLY

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KB0NLY
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2003, 10:26:16 PM »

Virtual PC, thats what it was.  Thanks for mentioning that, i couldn't remember the name of it.

73,

Scott, KB0NLY

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W3JJH
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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2003, 10:19:20 AM »

You can run Windows software under Virtual PC.  Our club uses CT for logging at Field Day, and that's how I run it on my iBook.  BTW, Windows 2000 is more stable on my Macs running Virtual PC than it is on the IBM box with Intel inside that's cluttering my desk at work.

Apple supports the Open Source community.  Apple has a free version of X11 which I use to run Linux software such as DarwinPSK, the Mac version of LinPSK.  Installing Linux software on my Macs running OS X is no more difficult than on my Linux machine.

And there's some good Mac-only software out there if you know where to look.
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KG7GA
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2003, 01:50:25 AM »

I use an iMac running OS X and am pretty happy.  Definitely not as much niche SW as for the PC, but the stuff that's there is really good.  All the basic app categories are covered very well on the mac.

There are lots of good reasons to use a Mac, and lots of good reasons to use a PC.   I have both here, but spend most of my time on the Mac because I enjoy it more.   Stability has been great.

I have used a packacge called MacLoggerDX which is quite good.
I recommend it.   For those who think ham software on the Mac under OS/X is not mature, check out their web site for the photo..

http://www.dogparksoftware.com/MacLoggerDX.html
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K7LZR
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2003, 02:51:20 AM »

Stay with the PC for ham use. I use both a PC running Win2k pro, and a Macintosh G3/300. The G3 runs OS 9.1 and does a wonderful job of general internet cruising and graphics rendering, and a few other apps which I use it for. BUT, there are very few ham programs for it, and I really like programs such as Hamscope and MMSSTV and ChromaPix, etc. It just seems to me that the Mac has such a small market share that software authors are not trying too hard to produce really good Ham software for it. Also, in my particular case anyway, it is really hard to find replacement and/or upgrade parts for a Mac. Example: I live in a town with an overall population of 49,000 or so, which includes all population within a 15 mile radius of city center. We have a Fred Meyer store, Wal-Mart, Big K-Mart, Bi-Mart, lots of mall stores, and about 7-10 new & used computer stores. Seems that each of our computer stores always stock a few of the latest parts for PCs, including the latest motherboards, video cards, etc., but almost NOTHING for Macs. Gets a blank stare when I ask. If I relied on my Mac everyday and it had a serious breakdown then I'd be screwed. Stay with the PC unless you just must have a Macintosh.
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N2ERN
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Posts: 238




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« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2003, 05:54:51 PM »

Here's a web site that tries to keep up with OS X ham software:

http://homepage.mac.com/smuncy/hamradio/HamsAndX.html

I keep an old PC laptop here in the shack for when i just HAVE TO run something that's not available for my Mac. I haven't needed to dig it out for a year.

OS X runs under UNIX, doesn't crash, and Macs are practically virus-free.  Installing software is a no-brainer. The hardest part of making the transition is that you have to learn to LEAVE OUT 75% of the steps it takes to do anything under Windoze.

Just one ham's opinion.
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KB3DVS
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« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2003, 07:07:16 PM »

First I'll answer the Question:
      I use Digipan on my four year old Apple PowerBook running in emulation using Virtual PC. I use an external SignalLink interface to take the audio I/O of the PowerBook and connect it to the phone jack of my Icom 706. No problem.
     IMHO, there is "adequate" ham software for Mac, but I feel PC software is better, more diverse and sometimes free. However, platform is almost irrelevant any more. Pick your platform based on what the main thing is that you'll be doing with your machine.
     You can emulate Windows for certain apps, but you can't emulate a Mac's ease of use and tight integration.  
 
---
KD1S writes:
> PC's nowadays ROCK! I'm running ...How much did I pay for this  
> system? Less than $700. Built it myself of course.
 
     There are amazing Hams who can build a transceiver with tree bark and spit, and then there are those who will never ever open up their rig. Same goes for computers. Don't demean others because you can.  
 
---
KA7BTV writes:
> it is really hard to find replacement and/or upgrade parts for a Mac.  
> [in my] town with an overall population of 49,000 or so
 
     How many big amateur radio stores in small town America?  
     Mail order works for amateur radio and it works for Apple parts. Anything you need for old ham gear, specialty parts, etc, is available online. Same with Macs.
 
---
     I did once get a cheap little PC laptop just for Ham use. But I had to call on others to help me fix it constantly. Not worth the hassle and I don't want to learn to be a computer enginner, Windows debugger... (they have courses and certification in that stuff!)  I just want to communicate.  
     I don't overclock and custom chip my Macs, nor do I trick out my cars. I buy stuff and I have lots of fun using it as it was designed to be used. You do what works for you.  
 
Anthony.
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KF6KYD
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2003, 10:06:48 PM »

You can also try www.dogparksoftware.com . I use Macs although I haven't interfaced one to a rig yet.
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AL3W
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2003, 02:12:14 AM »

At first glance, you would expect to have far fewer software  options on the Macintosh than you do on Wintel PCs, and many comments on this thread seem to support this claim.  Reality is, nothing could be farther from the truth - in fact you have more choices on a modern Macintosh than you do on a PC.

With a Mac, you have an excellent satellite package with MacDoppler Pro.  It's a top notch program.  With Multimode, you have access to all of ham radio's digital modes, PSK, SSTV, packet, etc.  There's logging programs available as well.  If you don't mind classic Mac OS, there's boatloads of older Mac software out there as well.

You also have emulation options available.  VirtualPC allows you to run any Windows software out there.  VPC is a robust and mature product, and you can do lots of hamming on it.  I have run Hamscope, SSTV, and some Packet Engine (the name escapes me) quite well on my iMac and iBook running Jaguar.  Just try to run MacDoppler on a wintel box!

Lastly, OS X is built on BSD unix.  This means there are all kinds of experimenting opportunities out there for porting Linux and unix applications to OS X.  EchoMac is one such program that lets you use your Mac with the EchoLink repeater system.

Personally, I've used Macs for hamming for years.  They've served me well.  Oh and they look great too.


73's de John
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