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Author Topic: Question about school stations  (Read 1296 times)
KI4QDY
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Posts: 3




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« on: July 20, 2006, 06:27:04 AM »

My son goes to a gifted high school.  There are no kids at the school who are hams.  Our club has spoken about and demonstrated ham radio to these kids, and they get put off by the code. There is a member of our club (his kids go there also), who is willing to donate an entire station to the school.  I would be willing to set it up, and teach a class for the kids to get their tickets.  The bureaucracy of the school would be no problem.  My question is, what are the pitfalls in setting up a school station from scratch, and training a bunch of kids to get their tickets? I really could use some feedback from someone who'se "Been there, done that."

It's a nice station from what I hear.

Thanks,

73's

Jeff Watson  
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12688




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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2006, 07:29:10 AM »

I'd check with ARRL. I belive they have a whole information package available for you.

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KI4QDY
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2006, 08:30:41 AM »

I would greatly appreciate that.

73

Jeff
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2006, 06:21:09 PM »

Jeff:

I don't have any advice for you, but I do wish you good luck and success with the project.

We had a club station in Hume Fogg High School in Nashville in the 50s and 60s. We tried to put an old BC-610 on the air and got a visit from the FCC for putting a harmonic on top of the Nashville Paging Service frequency. (Pagers were on the old VHF-Low in those days) Needless to say we took it off the air pronto!

73,

Lon - W3LK
Baltimore, Maryland
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5R8GQ
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Posts: 203




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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2006, 04:54:33 PM »

I truly wish you all the luck in the world, and I applaud your efforts.

Nevertheless, it seems like the task of Sisyphus.

Show a kid an HT and he'll say "Big Deal, I can do ten times more stuff with my cell phone!" (And he's right.) Chat with someone on the other side of the planet? "Big Deal, I can do that on the Internet, and I don't need expensive equipment OR study for a license!"

Are there kids out there enchanted with the "magic of wireless" like we were? Of course there are. Are there enough of them at an ordinary High School or Jr. High to warrant the installation of a full blown ham station? I have no idea. Maybe a Power Point presentation from the ARRL can be shown in science classes first. Or try it out first at magnet schools.
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W8CAR
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« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2006, 07:04:59 AM »

Jeff, I applaud your efforts and wish you luck. I taught for 30 years in a middle school (6-8)and had a small station set up at one time. It was a 10 meter 25 watt transceiver and a simple dipole antenna. The kids loved talking to hams in foreign countries and asking questions. One of my students became pen pals with a girl with the same first name in England. But that is as far as it went. I never got a club up and running due to the demands of teaching/coaching. I do have some suggestions for you. First, as has been mentioned check with the ARRL they have good materials and ideas. If you are going to set up a station to generate some interest I'd get some of the students involved in making and setting up antennas and the station itself. Kids love hands on stuff. The technician license is available without any code test. If you could get one of the teachers to give students some credit for studying for and taking the test it might be some incentive.
My experience has been that kids, especially in high school, are so involved in sports and other activities that have have to be really excited to dedicate time to a new activity. If you can generate that excitement and fun attitude you should be succcessful. Good luck again

Dan W8CAR
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1735




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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2007, 10:36:28 PM »

    You might want to start by trying to get the kids interested in CB radio first.  The equiptment is cheap and they can set up their own home station for under $100, and loads of CBers eventually wind up becoming hams!  When I was in high school, many kids in the school were on CB.
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