Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 2 Meter radios subject to Part 15?  (Read 1630 times)
KC0OGN
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« on: November 29, 2009, 03:16:57 PM »

Maybe this is a stupid question, but why does my yaesu ft-2900 have a part 15 compliance sticker on it? I have never noticed this until today. I have read over the part 15 rules and found nothing relating to 2 meters or Licensed Amateur radio devices. I was always under the assumption that part 15 was for unlicensed operation. If my radio is subject to part 15 rules, where does my protection from part 97 come in?
Logged
KJ4MPW
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2009, 06:53:16 PM »

Not a lawyer, blah di blah....

The way I interpret such a notice is that the device is able to comply with Part 15 rules, and therefore CAN legally be used without a license so long as Part 15 is complied with. However, it can also be used with a license under the relevant Part (in this case Part 97) without the restrictions of Part 15.
Logged
KC0OGN
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2009, 07:10:15 PM »

I don't see how it could be used without a license when the radio is specifically for 144-148 mhz. I see your point, but there are no unlicensed radio services in that freq. range within the FCC jurisdiction anyway. Just doesn't make much sense to me to put that sticker on there.
Logged
W3JKS
Member

Posts: 197


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2009, 04:55:42 AM »

Part 15 certification in this case is required because it is an electronic device which may generate unintentional radio emissions.  Many receivers, for example, generate small emissions from the case and leakage to the antenna.  The Part 15 certs don't refer to unlicensed operation, they refer to the unintentional emissions.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12638




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2009, 06:20:34 AM »

See http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/part15.html

W3JKS has it correct. The receiver is subject to Part 15 as an unintentional radiator. No FCC certification or type acceptance is required for amateur radio operation. The transmitter is NOT certified for unlicensed use.
Logged
KC0OGN
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2009, 04:14:21 PM »

I guess it makes sense when you say it that way. I suppose any electronic device could become an unintentional radiator. Think about this...does part 97 supercede part 15? For example, I'm tranmitting and I'm causing interference to another part 15 device. Under part 15 that device must accept given interference, but also since my radio is now deemed a part 15 device, does that mean that I should not interfere with said part 15 device? Even though my radio operations are governed under part 97? Maybe I'm and thinking too much into it, just seems contradictory to put a part 15 sticker on a part 97 device.
Logged
WZ9O
Member

Posts: 40




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2009, 04:50:57 AM »

KJ4MPW

Quote/ Not a lawyer, blah di blah....

The way I interpret such a notice is that the device is able to comply with Part 15 rules, and therefore CAN legally be used without a license so long as Part 15 is complied with. However, it can also be used with a license under the relevant Part (in this case Part 97) without the restrictions of Part 15. Quote/




Unbelievable statement!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12638




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2009, 05:34:33 AM »

Maybe I'm and thinking too much into it..
--------------------------------------------
Yup :-)  All the Part 15 sticker means is that the mfg ran tests to ensure that the local oscillators (above 30MHz) in the receiver do not radiate enough signal to be likely to interferre with other services. It has no impact on its use under Part 97 as an amateur radio transceiver.
Logged
KC0OGN
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2009, 07:34:06 PM »

I sent an email to Riley Hollingsworth and he got in touch with someone in the office of engineering and technology and they said the reason the radios have to have part 15 cert is because they can recieve out of band. I guess when you are recieving out of band, you are operating under part 15.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20536




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2009, 12:06:38 PM »

>RE: 2 Meter radios subject to Part 15?       Reply
by KC0OGN on December 5, 2009    Mail this to a friend!
I sent an email to Riley Hollingsworth and he got in touch with someone in the office of engineering and technology and they said the reason the radios have to have part 15 cert is because they can recieve out of band. I guess when you are recieving out of band, you are operating under part 15.<

That makes absolutely no sense.  Can you cut & paste this correspondence so we can read word for word what was actually written?

Part 15 has absolutely nothing to do with in band, out of band, etc.  It is a broad spectrum document that covers any device with an oscillator in it or otherwise capable of generating or receiving electromagnetic frequency interference.  Other than toasters, power drills, light bulbs, etc. virtually everything we use is a Part 15 device.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12638




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2009, 02:53:56 PM »

I think Part 15 now also includes requirements for blocking cellular frequencies from "scanning receivers". It really has nothing to do with being able to receive out of band, but rather NOT being able to receive the cellular frequency range. Any receiver that operates on 30-900 MHz *AND* is capable of automatically switching between 4 or more frequencies *AND* automatically stopping an a busy frequency is classified as a "scanning receiver". That triggers Part 15 certification requirements for most amateur VHF/UHF radios - in addition to the "unintentional radiator" requirements.
Logged
DROLLTROLL
Member

Posts: 265




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2009, 05:32:00 AM »

It requires pt.15 simply because the receiver's local oscillator (which is outside of the 144-148 band) could possibly radiate back up and out through the antenna jack into your antenna. If your receiver was scanning then you'd have a sweeping oscillator broadcasting the receiver's L.O. all over your neighbourhood.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12638




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2009, 05:46:24 AM »

Look up Part 15.121. It's a Part 15 section that addresses "scanning receivers". Most VHF/UHF ham transceivers require Part 15 certification for BOTH issues; unintentional radiator AND scanning receivers because their receivers have a scanning function.

Logged
WA9SVD
Member

Posts: 2201




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2009, 07:06:07 AM »

Since Riley has retired from the FCC, how did he "contact someone in the office?"  As said previously, the claim is nonsense.  The FCC Certification ensures that the RECEIVER portion of Amateur equipment complies with the radiation limits for Part 15 above 30 MHz, and has NO bearing on what frequencies the radio is actually capable of receiving.
Logged
WMCO
Member

Posts: 35




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2010, 11:37:39 AM »

KJ4MPW

Quote/ Not a lawyer, blah di blah....

The way I interpret such a notice is that the device is able to comply with Part 15 rules, and therefore CAN legally be used without a license so long as Part 15 is complied with. However, it can also be used with a license under the relevant Part (in this case Part 97) without the restrictions of Part 15. Quote/




Unbelievable statement!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Why is it an unbelievable statement? Don't you realize that a part 15 device can operate in the 2m or for that mater in ANY hamband? As long as the device abides with part 15 it can operate anywhere it wants as long as it is not interfering...so if it is working on 144.210 in FM part 15 the only recourse you have is that you can complain of interference to you but you will have to prove it, moreover you will have to show why you where not able to change your frequency. Now if you start a qso there with directional antennas and don't get interfered with but interfere with them, then they have no recourse.
Part 15 devices only have a few frequencies where they can not operate...and those are international emergency and aviation frequencies...ham bands are NOT protected from them.
J.C.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!