Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Arrow OSJ 146/446, is it worth it?  (Read 15121 times)
W3TEZ
Member

Posts: 32




Ignore
« on: December 30, 2009, 08:02:46 PM »

i might buy myself an 8800 or 8900, i might go with the 8900 just incase i need the 10 meters and 6 meters. anyway, i have a arrow j pole antenna that i had a problem with running on my ht because of the coax having a short in it, which dropped the coax down to 30 ohms insted of 50 ohms. the highest i have had my jpole is in my attic, but it did not get out that well because of many structures blocking the signal. if i put this antenna up on top of my house, how far is the range on this antenna, or how good will it do simplex on 2 meters or 440. i am just curious.
Logged
K9KJM
Member

Posts: 2415




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2010, 12:01:25 AM »

The Arrow OSJ 146/446 is just a very simple low cost, About no gain antenna.  Don't expect just too much performance from it, But as they say, ANY outdoor antenna is LOTS better than none!

Remember that at VHF/UHF frequencies coax feedline loss becomes critical. For very short runs like less than 25 or so feet, RG8X will work, But for any length longer than that, Get some TIMES LMR400 coax, Which is good for lengths up to 75 or so feet.

Do lots of research in your local area to find out just how much, IF any, 6 and 10 meter FM activity there is  near you. Most areas have about NONE. (Almost all "DX" on 6 and 10 meters is on SSB and CW)

The Yaesu FT8900 has a very miserable memory channel arrangement as compared to the great FT8800.
So UNLESS there is LOTS of local activity on 6 or 10 FM, Do yourself a favor and save a few bucks and get the 8800 (Which is a GREAT radio)
Logged
AD7C
Member

Posts: 81




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2010, 02:42:24 PM »

Had a 8900... traded for an 8800.  Memory is SOOOO much better and rarely every used the 6/10m bands.

I currently run an OSJ 146/446 in my attic (single story) and it works great.  I do only have a 23' run of coax.  Mmy HT can easily work most all the repaters in my area on 2.5w or less. Mind you... Phoenix is very flat and most repeaters are up on mountain tops so there is an advantage.  Simplex on 5w gets a decent range.  If I ran better coax and mounted on roof top I am sure it would cover a lot better.  

Is it going to work like a beam... No.
Is it a miracle antenna... No.
Does it work well for FM... Yes.
Can you beat it for the price... Probably not.
Will it last forever... just about.  Darn things are built like a tank.

My $.02
Logged
KE7UFQ
Member

Posts: 44




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2010, 03:51:50 PM »

If your going to mount it and not use  it for satellite use, you may consider the Elk 2M 440 dual band antenna. I bought one for satellite use, but I like it for local repeater stuff better. The duplexer limits the Arrow to 10w. I have run the Elk up to 100W with my FT-897D with no problems.

 They used to be ~$98.00 a year or so ago, but it looks like they are now $125.

http://www.elkantennas.com/2m4405element.htm
Logged
NE3R
Member

Posts: 11




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2010, 11:45:22 AM »

That is what I have.  It is a simple antenna that is a little better on 2 meters than a 1/4 wave.  I get OK simplex range.  I'm in a little bit of a valley, so I don't get out all that far.  I don't know much about the 70cm side, it has good SWR, and works well for the local repeaters, but I have never really tried anything to far out.

Inside the attic will work, but not as good as getting out just above the roof line.  One of the reasons I chose this antenna was because I'm antenna restricted and it has a low visual profile.  It is mounted to my chimney.

73 de Joseph M. Durnal NE3R
Logged
N6WIN
Member

Posts: 27


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2010, 12:15:21 PM »

The Arrow 146/446 is well built, cheap, is at unity, and works well for what it is. I bought it to take the the desert with me, mount it outside the trailer at 15' and work repeaters up to 50 miles away using 1-5 watts. It does this for me... it also allows me to monitor local FRS/GMRS frequencies that my friends and family transmit on.

I would mount it on the roof as compared to inside the structure. Use good quality coax as noted. The cost of LMR400 is not much more than RG213, and has lower loss.

I'd say it like this... take your HT inside the house and see what your signal is like into some local repeaters. Then walk outside in the clear and do the same. The results should be what you find with the Jpole inside vs outside.
Logged
W6CD
Member

Posts: 213


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2010, 06:11:46 PM »

Arrow 146/446 is what I have.  I have had it up about 15' for a few years.  Works the local repeaters that I need to.  Inexpensive, simple, rugged, very well made, and works well for the type of antenna it is - what more can one ask for?

I echo the recommendation for LMR400 cable.
Logged
KB4OIF
Member

Posts: 73




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2010, 03:12:21 AM »

Get your antenna "outside" the building and up as high as you can get it.  The RG8x cable is ok for short runs as was stated before,  Go with the LMR 400 or a lower loss type of coax.  There has been problems with the small knobs on the 8800.  don't go with the 8900 unless you know there is activity in your area.  6 and 10 meters are starting to open some but the openings are not all that much so far in this sunspot cycle.  My suggestion is the V71A from Kenwood.  The arrow antenna is a very good choose, but it needs to be outside and up in the air as far as you can get it. 
Logged
KA1MDA
Member

Posts: 543




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2010, 02:55:54 PM »

What makes you think your coax has a short in it- and how did you manage to measure the 30 ohms impedance? Are you using an antenna analyzer or an ohm meter? You can't use an ohm meter to measure impedance. RF impedance and DC resistance are two completely different things. If you WERE using an ohm meter and measured 30 ohms, your coax is open or has a high resistance connection somewhare, not shorted. A J-pole should show a dead short across the feedline using an ohm meter.

Tom, KA1MDA
www.ka1mda.org
Logged
AJ4EM
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2010, 03:54:49 PM »

I built a copy of that antenna.  I don't know if I saved anything, being as I had to buy a set of taps and dies, but I enjoyed it more than buying ready-made.
http://www.barnstablearc.org/index.php?name=UpDownload&req=viewsdownload&sid=3
The same design with more detailed instructions is out there somewhere, I'm not finding my links right now...

I built just a 2m version, without the middle stalk.
Logged
KB1GMX
Member

Posts: 832




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2010, 10:21:03 AM »

What makes you think your coax has a short in it- and how did you manage to measure the 30 ohms impedance? Are you using an antenna analyzer or an ohm meter? You can't use an ohm meter to measure impedance. RF impedance and DC resistance are two completely different things. If you WERE using an ohm meter and measured 30 ohms, your coax is open or has a high resistance connection somewhare, not shorted. A J-pole should show a dead short across the feedline using an ohm meter.

Tom, KA1MDA
www.ka1mda.org

The OSJ146/440 is an OPEN STUB J-pole.  The caps are to highlight the distinction as you
can feed a j-pole open(OSJ stand for open stub jpole) or shorted(wire or plumbers delight
j-pole).  I build wire (twinlead or ladderline) Jpoles as open stub to save the tapping up
from the bottom hassle.  It works the same both ways with one exception the fed element
is not DC grounded and should have a gap or gas tube lightening suppressor and well
as mast/bracket grounding.

If the user sees 30 ohms (DC resistance) when connected to the OSJ, he has a coax
problem or some material that exhibits resistance shorting the 19" feed element to the
bracket or other elements.

If the measurement was at RF and the impedance reflected was 30ohms then it's
material(s) close to the antenna likely detuning it.

In both cases performance will suffer and the radio will be unhappy.

Other than that the OSJ is a simple, rugged end fed vertical half wave antenna. 
I have two, one on the tower for FM ops and the other set up for portable
ops (portable tripod, with masting for events).  I like it as i can toss it around
and  not worry that it will break or bend.  Doesn't hurt that they are inexpensive
too.


Allison
Logged
KF5AMX
Member

Posts: 38




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2010, 02:22:14 PM »

I have one in my attic and can hit the repeaters at least 30 miles away and very clear.  I havent tried it longer... but its defintely rugged and well built and great auto tuned..
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!