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Author Topic: Disaster strikes. What would you want on hand?  (Read 44943 times)
N1AUP
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Posts: 15




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« on: January 13, 2010, 11:35:33 AM »

Seeing how most of the experts suggest that a terrorist or natural disaster will happen sooner or later, I'm taking steps to prepare for when TSHTF.  I bought a non-switching battery charger, and will be picking up a gel battery of some sort to power the scanners, the VHF / UHF and HF rigs, and other items.  I just bought a Sangean PR-D7 AM / FM radio (it runs on 12 V as well as an AC adapter or rechargables), and socked in a supply of batteries.  Whenever the car comes home at night, I fill the gas tank before putting it away.  Have four, 5 gallon cans of gas, matches, and enough dry foods to last 1 month. Three Maglite flashlites,

What other kinds of things should I have on hand to make it through a disaster?

Insights and ideas would be appreciated.

C
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K5END
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Posts: 1309




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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2010, 11:59:36 AM »

Aside from ammo and canned food?

Maybe a wind mill generator and solar cells.

I'm also looking into fuel cells for long term energy storage.

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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3734




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« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2010, 05:41:33 PM »

McGuyver!

sorry could not resist.

Leatherman tool, several days of drinking water per person,
can foods you can heat outside on the grill or by fire.

73 james
« Last Edit: January 13, 2010, 05:43:26 PM by KE4DRN » Logged
K9KJM
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Posts: 2415




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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2010, 11:27:11 PM »

I have been running my entire hamshack on a deep cycle type battery, With a 10 amp FULLY AUTOMATIC type charger for well over 20 years now. Works great.

For some info to bring you up to speed:

http://www.survivalblog.com/

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K5LXP
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Posts: 4522


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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2010, 11:40:40 AM »

Cash, in case you run out of ammo and canned food.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K3JVB
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Posts: 837


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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2010, 05:13:56 PM »

Ammo, food, ...ammo will be the cash needed to buy food.

73
John
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3734




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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2010, 07:51:01 PM »

hi,

Wrist Rocket or other slingshot, bow and arrow or
other hunting gear so you can get food to eat.

plenty of rabbits and deer in our area.

73 james
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WB5JEO
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Posts: 805




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« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2010, 12:21:06 PM »

With the most likely sort of disasters in general, I think mainly in terms of electrical service failure and the things we might depend on using it for. Obviously, lighting is one. Coleman type lanterns are good, and it doesn't take a huge stock of fuel to run them for a long time. Since water distribution systems depend on it, and alternate sources of water require purification, the better quality filters designed for wilderness backpacking are nice and have a long shelf life before use. And having clean containers standing by that can be filled while the system is still up takes the load off of finding water and delays the start of having to treat what you can find. A rainwater collection system is a bigger deal, but it's not wasted, if you routinely use if for watering. A modest solar charging arrangement can keep some power up in those things that can't be run for weeks on anything else. It often turns out that it's the little things that make a situation bearable. Toilet paper, for instance. And a place to go. Also, various OTC medications for intestinal problems and such should be kept on hand and fresh. And, along with basic essential foods, some small luxuries help a lot. Candies and various sweet foods that keep well. And the ability to prepare hot food is an important psychological support. What you do to prepare for that depends on what's around you. And where I am, the ability to insect screen a porch or carport for sleeping space would make a huge difference in summer. And make it a habit to refill needed prescription medications as far ahead of running out. Most things will be over reasonably soon. Apocalyptic vaporings aside, what can make this stuff necessary? Power grid failure from a solar event is one. Earthquake, where that's a reasonable possibility, is another. Freak hurricanes that penetrate far inland can be a problem. But it's nice to be ready for even something more common, like a three-day power outage. 

And don't neglect keeping absolutely necessary documents in a water proof box that can be picked up and taken when evacuation is required, and the amount you can take with you is limited.
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KC9CFM
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2010, 07:23:46 PM »

Lots of food, and lots of guns/ammo.  Maybe a ham radio to keep you from getting bored, since they're won't be much to do except avoid dying.
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K6CMJ
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2010, 01:45:01 PM »

Having experienced a couple of real "survival type" experiences, the most important things are food, water and shelter. Have a supply of several days of food and water and then a way to get what you need after that. A rifle and ammo are best for food. A filter is best for water. A knife and hatchet are best for shelter. Other things include rope or string, stove and fuel. Communications equipment would be good.

My last experience was in the battle of Fallujah in 2004 when my unit was cut off from the rest of US forces for about 3 days. All of the above came in handy when surviving. Also, have the knowledge to prepare and cook game animals.
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KC6YFR
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2010, 08:59:42 PM »

Here's a thought that a friend and I acted upon. We built a teardrop trailer. For more information check out www.mikenchell.com. Hundreds have built teardrop trailers to flee hurricanes. Everything you need for several days can be backed and ready to go on a moment's notice. The gel cell is always up and ready. (it's on a trickle charger all the time.) It's also great for camping! I began with a Harbor Freight trailer and just  built a box on it.
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KB1OCC
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Posts: 172




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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2010, 05:52:47 AM »

Um, first my family.
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ALCO141
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Posts: 71




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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2010, 01:10:40 PM »

i have one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=66619

it runs a long time on a gallon of gas, will charge batteries, run your furnace, turn on some lights, in general keep some normalcy in your life for outages, you can do a lot with a little electricity.
alex
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N8JGU
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2010, 09:26:53 AM »

Just my B.O.B.  I know when a crisis occurs we will always be caught off guard and unpreparred.  Learn to survive with the bare minimal and learn how to aquire what you need when your caught off guard.  Plan ahead, get your mind straight.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1747




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« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2010, 02:22:20 PM »

A 40 channel AM/SSB CB mobile radio.  If the power grid goes down, all phone and internet service may be lost.  A CB hooked to any car battery can give you the ability to communicate with many local non hams and truckers, who may have valuable information about local area conditions and emergency operations.
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