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Author Topic: Disaster strikes. What would you want on hand?  (Read 40963 times)
KC8VWM
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Posts: 3124




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« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2010, 09:11:40 PM »

All I need is a buck knife.

Everything else I need is already inside my head.
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KE5TTU
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« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2010, 05:54:15 AM »

Our most common disaster (inconvienence) is temporary power outages. With the recent snow here in North Texas, we were out for 3 days. With an elderly couple living with us, this became more of a problem. Lessons learned: Standard 'tapir' style candles give off more light than those designer 'fat' ones. Oil Lamps are even better. Our 2200 watt gas generator was just not enough to run space heaters and the refrigerator. (it's 20+ years old anyway) It died just before the power was restored. I am replacing it with a propane powered generator. Dealing with gasoline(storing, rotating, smell, mess) is something I just don't care to do next time.
For more severe disasters, we have a skoolie/camper. (converted school bus) that is packed and ready to use as a bug-out vehicle. www.jesperskoolie.tk
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N8BHL
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« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2010, 10:02:10 AM »

I agree, the most useful item I have is a 13-15K automatic cutover generator. This provides power to the well pump, furnace, sump pump, 4 freezers some lights and my ham radio room. So my family, food, and property are protected as a normal part of country life. I keep spare antennas and masts, and my daily mobile U/V/HF radios are a good backup. Don't forget to add substantial first aid and fire extinguishers for home and mobile - if it's that bad, the fire department may not be able to get to you for a while.
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VK5CQ
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« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2010, 03:24:20 PM »

NOTE: I've attempted, here, update the traditional list, in line with recent technology developments

A freshly-charged Electric Car with lots of trunk space, and maybe a trailer for what doesn't fit in the car.

It would also be good to have:

- sturdy, wheeled plastic boxes - with lock-down lids - to hold sets of gear, by type, eg:

1. portable HF base
2. loanable handhelds
3. loanable APRS kits (GPS+radio+mag.mount-ant.+battery)
4. water, food, etc. (incl toilet paper & garb.bags)
5-sum warm weather clothing (several sets), soap, shaving kit, tooth care, hearing aid batteries ;-)
5-win. cold weather clothing (several sets), etc.
6. office gear (kits of (GPS + map)'s; FAX/phone/port.phone-patch, net/freq lists, address/phone number, phonebooks, etc.)

Stuff likely to be too big for boxes:
1. Shelter: tent, sleeping bag, fold-up chair/desk
2. Antenna mast sets
3. Solar panels
4. Portable windmill (vehicle-mountable)
4. Generators (With all the new renewable-energy... do we really still need these?!?)

...and lots more that I'll remember when I get to the top of the hill, and am starting to set up  :-/
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NH7YS
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« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2010, 08:31:30 PM »

For me it's Water!
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K8KAS
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Posts: 569




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« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2010, 06:25:32 AM »

My AR-15, my Glock and a good shotgun plus a good supply of ammo, second a supply of canned food stuffs and some means of travel. Ham stuff your kidding aren't you? Denny K8KAS
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N5YPJ
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Posts: 642




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« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2010, 01:42:48 PM »

A vegetable garden. A two to three week water supply properly stored assuming one gallon per person per day. A gasoline fueled Coleman stove and lantern and a few gallons of unopened Coleman fuel, the Coleman name is worth paying for. A .22 rifle and a 500 rd brick and a good sharp Buck knife.
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W5HTW
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« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2010, 03:16:45 PM »

A bottle of scotch, some water, and some ice cubes.  I can survive without the ice cubes, and if things get really bad I can make it without the water.  But then, make that two bottles of J&B.

Ed
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NA0AA
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Posts: 1043




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« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2010, 11:28:59 AM »

Food, Water, medicines, your papers [please], money [greenbacks, silver and gold depending on your bent]

The rest depends on if I'm at a home disaster or need to leave disaster.  If I need to leave, the teardrop gets attached.

Otherwise, I have a generator, lights, etc.

Radios?  Whatever for?  You are assuming that:

1.  Someone is there to hear you
2.  They can do something about it

I suggest reading "An Oral History of World War Z" for a bit of a discussion on how useful radio is...
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N5YPJ
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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2010, 01:51:27 PM »

Our most common disaster (inconvienence) is temporary power outages. With the recent snow here in North Texas, we were out for 3 days. With an elderly couple living with us, this became more of a problem. Lessons learned: Standard 'tapir' style candles give off more light than those designer 'fat' ones. Oil Lamps are even better. Our 2200 watt gas generator was just not enough to run space heaters and the refrigerator. (it's 20+ years old anyway) It died just before the power was restored. I am replacing it with a propane powered generator. Dealing with gasoline(storing, rotating, smell, mess) is something I just don't care to do next time.
For more severe disasters, we have a skoolie/camper. (converted school bus) that is packed and ready to use as a bug-out vehicle. www.jesperskoolie.tk

I agree with you on the propane generator, anything less just pretty much ain't going to cut. I notice with gasoline we keep here for the lawn mower has a tendency to go stale pretty quickly. I'd also add eliminate as many essential electrical devices as possible - a gas cook stove vs electric or as in our case we can't have gas so we have a Coleman stove, Coleman lanterns for when you really need some light, propane space heater if you are all electric or a kerosene space heater. We had several neighborhood kids over here  years back during an extended outage in a cold snap - kept warm as could be on a few gallons of kerosene. Unfortunately not enough folks bought K-1 kerosene locally so the dealer dropped it without bothering to tell us stuck us with #2. Now I buy a 5 gallon can of K-1 expensive but worth it when the power blinks. There's several other short cuts to cut back on needing such a large generator capacity to survive, just look around.
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AF6WI
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« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2010, 09:41:50 PM »

If a disaster strikes, I want ten million dollars.

In fact, I want ten million dollars whether a disaster strikes or not.

My wife and I have a month's worth of food, a month's worth of water, and several changes of clothes, tent, air mattress, sleeping bags, and a few tents. We've got a coleman stove that runs on unleaded gas, so we'll have fuel to cook with. All our cooking gear is in a box, ready for our next camping trip. Big first aid kit. A couple of 110 amp-hour batteries, HF radio, U/VHF radio, antennas, cables.

Don't need no stinking generators, don't need no guns and ammo. Just gimme my ten million bucks.
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KB8UAQ
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2010, 10:41:56 AM »

You know, in these 'worst case-scenario survival' threads, when asked what people want on hand, how come no-one ever mentions soap, toothpaste, deodorant, and toilet paper? I don't know about you, but I wouldn't really want to run out of any of those things in an emergency, and they're all cheap and don't spoil, which means it's easy to have emergency supplies.
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2236




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« Reply #27 on: September 30, 2010, 01:48:47 PM »

It really depends on the area in which you live;
urban, suburban, rural, semi-rural, desert, plains, mountains.

WHEREVER you live there are two non negotiable axioms:

1) Don't rely on the Guv'ment to help you.
2) Ignore any advice they give you.


Katrina was Exhibit A for those statements.
Three day notice of record-breaking storm advancing
on major US coastal city located up to 50 feet below sea level
"protected" in places by 150 year old dirt levees.

Oh sure, the Feds SAY it couldn't happen again (what else WOULD they say?)
"We've revamped FEMA so this will never happen again."
"We have contingency plans for every possible emergency scenario."
"We have learned a lot of very valuable lessons from Katrina"
Well that last statement MAY be true...translated it means:
"Lie to the public until (if) we can get our sh** together"
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AE5JU
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Posts: 227




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« Reply #28 on: October 02, 2010, 10:04:18 PM »

WHEREVER you live there are two non negotiable axioms:

1) Don't rely on the Guv'ment to help you.
2) Ignore any advice they give you.


Katrina was Exhibit A for those statements.

Quoted for truth!


If you see people lined up, go somewhere else.

Be armed.

Water...

10-12 drops of ordinary laundry bleach per gallon of water, and let stand at least an hour to settle and clarify.  It will smell like swimming pool water, but it won't kill you.

Put a few ice cubes in a zip lock bag in your freezer.  If you've been away and the power has been out and come back on you can tell from the melted ice cube.  If it is not a cube, just some ice, don't eat anything from that freezer.  You don't know how long it thawed.

MRE's are pretty good eating, don't listen to naysayers.

Canned foods are good... but you need a mechanical can opener.  Get one, the best quality one you can find.  Get two, or three.  And get one of those little military ones that go on your keychain.  Those things work.

Keep cash on hand.  With power out your credit card is useless.  Even if power is on some places, the banking system may be down or overloaded.  Cash is king.  Also, be prepared to barter.  Nothing wrong with "I'll trade 3 MRE's for that big pack of D cells."

A good pocket knife.  Not a pen knife, I mean a real pocket knife.

Plenty of D and AA cells.  Buy in bulk.

Have several good flashlights.  I like Maglights, both for use as a flashlight, and can be used to fend off others if needed.  Get the LED replacement bulb and toss the old fashioned filament bulb.  You can get the LED type at Home Depot, etc.

Have some throwaway lighters even if you don't smoke.  I don't.  A useful item.

Wire all your ham radio power cables with Anderson Powerpoles.  Make a Y-cable with big clips to connect to posts of car batteries (your own, not looted, looting will get you shot... hell, I might shoot you myself).  When getting power cables, get the kinds that use the blade type automotive fuses.  Get spare fuses.  And you can scrounge them from your car, fuses used for accessories you really don't need.

There was a video of a kid returning to New Orleans after Katrina.  He described getting a call from a ham relaying a message from his dad.  The dad had stayed in New Orleans to protect the home, and fabricated an antenna from an electrical extension cord.  He hooked his ham gear to the car battery with wire he stripped from the water heater.  Lesson learned, make up a portable / emergency antenna now, well ahead of time, and have a way to power your gear already prepared.

Keep your firearms well concealed but close at hand and ready to use.

Don't draw attention to yourself.  And don't go chat with Officer Friendly, even if you know him.  He's tired, PO'd, and just not in the mood.

Anyone with FEMA is not to be trusted.

The above from actual experience, more than once. 

Don't loot.  Looting will get you shot.

73
Paul - AE5JU

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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3721




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« Reply #29 on: October 04, 2010, 04:40:55 PM »

Magesium Fire Starter, genuine Leatherman tool
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