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Author Topic: Can I Staple My Wire Antenna to my Roof  (Read 1759 times)
KB3PBZ
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Posts: 3




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« on: February 02, 2010, 10:44:12 PM »

I live in a town home and my HOA has restrictive covenants.  I'm thinking of running a stretch of 26 gauge insulated wire on the outside of the house, running from the ground floor up to the roof, then along the eaves and back down the other side.  What I'm wondering is how I should string this up.  Do you think it's OK to use a staple gun to attach the wire to the house?  I would avoid positioning the wire near metal flashing/gutters, but I'm wondering whether the metal staples will adversely affect the antenna?  If so, any suggestions for what I should use?
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KF6QEX
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2010, 11:09:10 PM »

Stapling wont make much difference while the wood is dry. Once it rains etc I guess all bets are off.

If you do have gutters, unless they are non-conductive running a wire along  side them might not be the best thing for an antenna.
I used angled screw-in hooks for mine.

If the shack is downstairs hiding the feedline is going to be more of a challenge than hiding the wire under the eaves. Usually you can only see there is a wire under the eaves  if you tresspass Smiley


Dimitri
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2010, 09:43:04 AM »

I've used a staple gun before.  If you put it on the back of the facia
board it can't be seen until you are right underneath it.  (Actually
#26 wire probably can be secured with a coat of paint.)

To provide a bit more insulation you can fold a skinny piece of plastic
over the wire and staple that down.  The only risk is that whatever
you use for an insulator may be more visible than the wire itself.
You might look for some heavy duty nylon thread in a color that
matches the house and use that as an insulator.
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KA4TWK
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 02:46:47 PM »

I stapled dipoles inside my attic.  I installed a 20 meter and 40 meter joined at the center feed point and used one coax to feed them. The 40 meter is set as a true dipole and the 20 meter at a right angle as an inverted V. I needed to do some fine tuning but it has worked for years using only 100 watts with no problems..... Hope this helps

Bill ka4twk.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2010, 06:27:51 PM »

Staples outside will probably rust.
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N3PM
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2010, 01:30:40 PM »

If you have "tabbed" asphalt type shingles, you can slip the wire underneath alternate tabs. Probably up to #16 insulated would work.
You could get stainless staples. I have them for my Arrow staplers. Trouble with face stapling shingles are the holes that are left behind if the staple falls or rusts out. Perhaps if the roof is done with weatherwatch first, the holes will self heal.
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K0PD
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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2010, 11:13:46 AM »

I recall reading a few yrs back that those little plastic hooks that are used to hang pictures with worked well for one Ham using i believe 18 gage wire .He used silcone to mount the hooks to the roof and for the wire for stability. I believe if my memory serves me well that he used color coated wire such as blue or black and with them being so close to the shingles or roofing it was virtually impossible to see from the ground and the hooks help keep the wire on the roof. My memory maybe not totally accurate but i think it's close.
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KB3PBZ
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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2010, 11:18:46 AM »

Guys--

Thanks for all the great responses and suggestions---you guys have a wealth of ideas and talent.  

The 26 ga wire is so fine that I'm now wondering whether I should avoid all the problems of staples (rusting, roof punctures, wire insulation punctures, etc.) and instead simply get a tube of clear silicon caulk and "tack" it into place...  A small amount of silicon caulk to hold the wire in place shouldn't do much to the RF would it?  

Thanks!

Kevin
KB3PBZ
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W0FM
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2010, 01:07:54 PM »

At my former condo, I simply ran a black insulated wire up to the black asphalt shingle roof, then ran the wire up the edge of the shingles to the peak of the roof.  I tacked it with a dab of black silicone every 2 feet along the way.  Then I did the same procedure across the peak of the roof and down the opposite side.  I fed it in the center of the top (with black coax, of course).  It was never discovered and held up quite well.  When I moved, I forgot to take it down and it may well be up there today, 15 years later. 

No damage to the roof or shingles, nothing visible from the ground.  No hassle from the condo cops.  Not a "proper" antenna, by any means, but it got me on the air.

73 de Terry, WØFM
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AA4PB
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« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2010, 01:22:31 PM »

The RTV idea might also permit you to maintain the antenna wire a little bit above the shingles which might also be of benefit, especially if the roof is wet.
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N0JEF
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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2010, 05:39:00 PM »

I layed wire on my roof once and tucked it under the edge of the shingles evey few feet to hold it in place.  It was a loop fed with ladder line and worked surprizingly well.  Not ideal of course, but anything is better than nothing.  Right?
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W6RMK
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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2010, 01:20:54 PM »

WHy stick with 26 gauge.. Go up to 18 or 20, at least. 20 AWG is about 30 mils in diameter You could even use bigger, if it's stuck to the roof.
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M6JDB
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« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2010, 02:44:23 PM »

Actually have you considered a fan dipole in the loft ? I am trying one out at the moment and have been pleasantly surprised by the results.
I found the plans and instructions at http://sites.google.com/site/wolverhamptonradio/
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