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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Please help with my new set up.  (Read 596 times)
PETERACKERMANEXKC2TFF
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Posts: 14




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« on: February 04, 2010, 11:58:22 AM »

I have had my technician now for about 2 years and have been mainly lurking with a Yaesu VX-7R and have finally decided to make the jump to a base rig and antenna. I am about to take the General test and I have acquired an Icom IC706MKIIG and a G5VR Junior Dipole. Two Questions, should I place the dipole east/west or north/south and what frequencies can I expect to get the best reception on? I have a tuner. Thanks for your replies.
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6497




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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 12:28:22 PM »

Depends on the time of day you operate and the time of year, plus how high your antenna is!  You are about to get an education in propagation.
I would suggest 20 and 17 meter operation for daytime and 20 , 40, and 80 meter operation at evening/nights.
73s.

-Mike.
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K1JHS
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Posts: 72




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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 12:44:16 PM »

Welcome to HF! Great rig for a starter. The G5RV will get you listening but you may find it frustrating when you get your General. That antenna works but is a "compromise" just about everywhere you will try to use it (I have one myself). If you have room, trees, etc where you live you might look at an 80 meter dipole (you can make this for under 40 bucks less the coax). The 80 meter dipole IMHO is a great learning antenna to build as a first one and you will find it "hears" alot better than the G5.

A simple 10 meter dipole will have you talking on your current license from 28300 to 28500. However not a great deal of activity going on right now since the sunspots are low. I never had much luck on 10 on my G5, just my 2 cents. There should be a phone contest this coming weekend on 10 if my memory serves correctly. Anyway hope this is encouraging and remember no matter how new or old you are there is ALWAYS something learn on HF. 73..... John
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KH6AQ
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Posts: 7718




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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2010, 01:17:45 PM »

Placing the antenna North-South is generally best for working the U.S.

Your antenna will work fine and you will make plenty of contacts. Remember that when the station you are hearing is running the same TX power as you are you will produce the same power at his receiver he does at your receiver. What this means is that if he is S-7 you are S-7. So, calling stations that are good copy usually ensures that they will hear you well.

To see what is happening around the world on various bands day and night click on DX Cluster Spots to the left of this page. That will give you a good idea of propagation around the world.

If you want to work plenty of DX CW is the way to go. 100 W to a mediocre antenna will get you DX on all open bands most days.
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PETERACKERMANEXKC2TFF
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 04:46:01 PM »

Tanks for the advise. I will be installing over the weekend. I am sure to have more questions and look forward to someday being the guy with the answers.
73
Peter
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WB5JEO
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Posts: 805




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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2010, 06:25:13 PM »

Don't bother much worrying about directional orientation. Unless you can mount it quite high in terms of wavelength for a given band, the pattern won't look anything like the model, which isn't all that directional anyway and tends to have lots of lobes in various directions. This will be true for all simple horizontal wires. In general, if you have choices, select for height. For instance, if you have a choice between 20 feet in one position and 40 feet in another, go for the 40 foot height. The directional pattern won't be anything much (but that's not what you select a simple wire for), but the take-off angle may be slightly better, or at least not predominately straight up on every band.

As was said, it's not bad at all to begin looking at propagation with an antenna with wide horizontal and elevation patterns. You get a better comparison among stations at different distances without the antenna characteristics getting in the way. For instance, with a Yagi at good height or a vertical, you would be optimized for a rather long distance, and closer stations will be farther down than plain propagation would suggest. As your interests narrow, you'll want to explore antennas that are doable for you and that are suited to what you want to do. The combinations of propagation conditions and antenna characteristics is an endless learning process.
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2010, 10:38:57 PM »

Congrats on getting on HF.

I had to start on HF.  When I got the opportunity to get on VHF, I couldn't imagine spending hambucks on anything other than making my station better for HF.

SInce you are in two land, consider installing your antenna NW-SE.  You'll have a lobe over most of the US and towards EU.

Whats nice about a wire antenna is that its easy to change it around.

73
Bob
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W8JI
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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 01:42:26 AM »

I have had my technician now for about 2 years and have been mainly lurking with a Yaesu VX-7R and have finally decided to make the jump to a base rig and antenna. I am about to take the General test and I have acquired an Icom IC706MKIIG and a G5VR Junior Dipole. Two Questions, should I place the dipole east/west or north/south and what frequencies can I expect to get the best reception on? I have a tuner. Thanks for your replies.

A G5RV Jr. will work on a few bands but it is often oversold by the people selling it. It will work about as well as a dipole or doublet at the same height on 40, 20, and 10 meters. Those will be your best operating bands. They are not too directive at typical heights, but the pattern is NOT the same on all bands.


A full size G5RV will work about the same as a dipole on 80,40,20, and 12 meters. It also works OK on 15. The pattern varies with height and frequency. They are not too directive at typical heights, but the pattern is NOT the same on all bands.

Tom

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