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Author Topic: Totally new station, what is missing...  (Read 955 times)
NI3S
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Posts: 67




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« on: February 07, 2010, 08:07:02 PM »

I am in the process of building a completely new station.  I have a dual band HT and homebuilt antennas, a beatup but now repaired 2m mobile (no tones so packet use). My TS-140 should be in this week. Older 20A PS, new netbook dedicated for ham shack use, and old PK-88 that needs PC software, SWR/watt meters, and some basic test gear (Multimeter, RF probe, RF sig generator).  In the process of building a multiband dipole. Grounding system is in place, and home made window feed through setup is done.  For digital modes, what is missing?  Homebrew is a preferred option, for the economics and challenge.  No idea about logging software, so certainly that is on the list.  

A mixed library of older ham books, and '09 HB and '10 antenna, so that area is covered.  

Thanks.
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KB2WIG
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Posts: 114




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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2010, 03:07:52 PM »

table lamp,coffee pot and a small refrigerator... a guzunder and a cumfie chair would be nice.


klc
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20540




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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2010, 04:30:23 PM »

Digital modes software is mostly free but you need a PC with a sound card and a keying interface which you can homebrew.

Not sure if the netbooks are appropriate, but then never tried one for this ap.

Antenna's the most important part of the station, so get it built, get it up HIGH and clear and give it a go!

Homebrewing antennas is part of the sport and great success can be achieved with wire and tall trees.
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K7UNZ
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Posts: 691




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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2010, 05:57:45 AM »

Not mentiioned, so I would add 'em to the list...

A dummy load and a hand key.  Even if you don't plan on CW, the key can be very usefull for testing gear on the workbench, and the dummy should be part of every station for tune-up and testing.

73, and have fun!

Jim/k7unz
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5820




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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2010, 09:54:50 AM »

How about tools?  A soldering iron, for one.  Oh, I see you say that the 2M is newly repaired so you may have that covered.  Patch cables are nice to have.  You say you have a multimeter, but do you have an assortment of test ends for it?  Probes are usual, but small alligator clips are too.  The newer spring loaded 'grab clips' are almost a necessity if you're going to work on newer equipment.

You'll need a good, comfortable operating chair.  I find that a desk chair you can be comfortable in either leaning forward to do close work or won't be afraid to lean back in and relax is best.  Try to find one with either a high back or an attached headrest.  A footstool may be an idea too.

Don't forget an arrangement to bring 120 volts to a handy point near your work/operating area--a multi outlet switched power strip may fill the bill here.  Bring a twelve volt feed source out to a handy point too--you'll never know when you'll want to do a temporary hookup to check a rig out or test a repair.

Also, don't forget emergency power and lighting.  You'll probably find that you're just getting into some interesting operating during a storm or something--and the power will go out!  It may be a one in a hundred shot, but you'll be kicking yourself for not seeing to it!

There are many more things you can do, and even though my few stretch the basics somewhat, you'll find out as you go what you'll want to incorporate into your shack!
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K3GM
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Posts: 1754




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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2010, 07:52:26 AM »

.....In the process of building a multiband dipole.....

MFJ 259B antenna analyzer will make your homebrew work a joy.
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2232




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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2010, 09:33:18 AM »

If you're going to be homebrewing and building your own gear, I would recommend a good flexible lamp with a magnifying lense, and a good circuit board vise. I like the Panavise circuit board vise. I also like the Weller WTCPT fixed temp soldering station. (You change temps by changing tips,. of which there are many styles, but I don't change tips all that often).
If you are doing a lot of soldering, I would setup a fan to blow fumes out of the area.
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WX7G
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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2010, 12:13:31 PM »

Logging software? I use N3FJP.
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W8VZM
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Posts: 67




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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2010, 05:57:34 AM »

Think about a piece of Lexan or glass for your desktop. It is useful for keeping maps, notes, freq lists, codes, pictures, just about anything handy without having pin holes in the walls.
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