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Author Topic: Running a Mobile radio as fixed station  (Read 906 times)
KD8MTI
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Posts: 4




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« on: March 22, 2010, 09:10:22 PM »

Hey Y'all, Quick question. I'm new to the hobby (got my tech license December '09) and kind of new to the technical aspects of stuff.

I have an older Icom IC-2000 i picked up at a ham fest yesterday, and it requires a power supply with more than 11 amp, My power supply is 8 amp, will I hurt the radio if i keep it running on the 8 amp?

Thanks.
KD8MTI
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2415




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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2010, 11:27:51 PM »

Just operate the radio on it's lower power settings and you should be fine until you can get a larger power supply.

Note that many of us use a marine deep cycle type battery (Or even better an AGM type) along with a fully AUTOMATIC type 10 amp battery charger to power radios.
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W7ETA
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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2010, 12:10:44 AM »

Try running it at half power until you get the power supply you need.  Its been years since I had a mobile rig on a power supply, never owned a rig that didn't have its own power supply, but my mobile would trip the circuit breaker in the power supply--not good for the power supply.

73
Bob
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KD8MTI
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2010, 07:35:25 AM »

Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I saw some nice radios at the ham fest, But didn't have $500 to spend.

I'll run it on medium power till I get a bigger power supply.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2384




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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2010, 09:35:16 AM »

Just so you have it, here is a link to where you can download a service manual for that radio;

www.download.n7tgb.net/Icom.../IC-2000_service_manual.pdf

Since you do not transmit continually (your duty cycle is way less than 100%) you do not need to provide the maximum current that the radio requires during transmissions at high power. The suggestions about using a battery and a charger are great as your radio would be able to get the higher current when you are transmitting but you will not break the bank on a 20-30 Amp DC supply. In addition, you would have at least a few hours of station operation during a power failure.

If go to that route, make sure that you fuse both the charger with a separate fuse for the radio. If you go with a charger make sure that you adjust it so you are not overcharging the battery. Remember that the radio will not like to see a voltage much more than 14.5 VDC (the manual indicates that you can damage the radio beyond 16 volts).

Using too small of a power supply can result in a voltage sag during transmission. For many microprocessor controlled radios this can result in a reboot. Your power supply will not like that either and eventually the supply could fail.

Hope this helps,

Tisha Hayes
AA4HA
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
AE5NE
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Posts: 102




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« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2010, 10:12:11 AM »

Using a deep-cycle or AGM battery is a great idea.  As long as your transmit time is limited in comparison to receive time, the battery will supply the high current during transmit and will be topped off by the charger during receive.

I personally use a 9-Amp-Hour "High Rate" battery (as used in a computer UPS), in parallel across a 13.8V regulated supply.  As long as the battery remains close to fully charged, it will just float there without drawing current.  If it is discharged, you must use a controlled charger or limit the current to limit the charge rate.


http://www.batteryuniverse.com/Sealed-Lead-Acid/B-B/HR9-12/GZ1290_B-B_HR9-12_Sealed-Lead-Acid-Battery


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KD8MTI
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2010, 10:29:37 AM »

Alrighty, I mainly listen/check into area nets. So I'll be fine transmitting a little bit on my current power supply?
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AA4PB
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Posts: 14354




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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2010, 11:54:39 AM »

On FM your duty cycle IS 100% during transmit. If you draw 11A from an 8A rated power supply you are likely to cook the supply. One failure senario is that the suppy's pass transistor(s) short and it applies 25V to your radio which in turn will likely kill the output transistors or IC in the radio. Keep the current under 8A by keeping the power selection down.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
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