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Author Topic: What is real "QRP"?  (Read 1636 times)
N5XO
Member

Posts: 104




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« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2010, 10:34:23 AM »

Maybe it depends on the individuals point of view...

Some say life is too short for QRP; so I suspect that crowd believes anything less than 1499 watts is QRP...

End of quote:------------------------------------------

Since I subscribe to the Tim Allen More Power theory of Ham radio and life itself....I believe anything under 1499.9 watts is QRP:)

The reality is 5 watts and under is QRP and even REAL QRP
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N5XO
Member

Posts: 104




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« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2010, 10:37:57 AM »

yes
they said that I should use such rig as FT-817
 
End of Quote:----------------------------------------

No matter what you do there is someone out there who will bitch about it. Non CW Generals, Extra's, etc are not real hams, wrong radio you are not real QRP.

Follow the rules and enjoy ham radio. The only person you are pleasing with your hobby should be yourself.

IF YOU ARE NOT HAVING FUN, IT'S NOT REAL HAM RADIO!
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K4KRW
Member

Posts: 98




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« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2010, 02:14:16 PM »

QRP rigs are a lot of fun.  It is especially fun to use one you designed and/or assembled yourself.

But, use any radio you want.  Operating at low power has so many challenges, any one of which can help you become a better operator.  

73,

Richard
K4KRW
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AD6KA
Member

Posts: 2232




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« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2010, 03:14:05 PM »

NV2A:
"My understanding of QRP is when the other guy has a sophisticated enough receiver and antenna system to hear your puny signal Cheesy"

I realize your remark was meant tongue-in-cheek, but
nevertheless you might be quite surprised to discover just how well a $100-150 "unsophisticated" QRP kit rig can hear other "puny" signals, even with a simple antenna.

QRP ops have watering holes just for this purpose, to work *other* QRP ops, who are often also running
"unsophisticated" direct or single conversion
kit built or homebrew gear with simple antennas. That and of course because a lot of our "unsophisticated" rigs are rock bound.
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KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 1970




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« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2010, 03:40:33 PM »

Interesting, another Amateur Radio Term that has no written in stone definition!  It amazes me that after 70+ years so many things in this Hobby still have no defined answer; it's just groups of people with different theories.
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K6AER
Member

Posts: 3468




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« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2010, 04:45:04 PM »

A lot of QRP requires someone to do the heavy lifting at the other end with:

A beam up high,
With low loss coax,
In a quiet location,
Using a high dynamic receiver,
Running 1000 watts because your suburban location has a S9 noise level.

This also applies to PSK as well.
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WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




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« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2010, 08:20:39 PM »

The term QRP is defined where it counts and that is contests and awards.

All contests I know of define QRP as 5 watts or less. All awards I know of define QRP as 5 watts or less.
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AD4U
Member

Posts: 2150




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« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2010, 06:24:27 AM »

QRP is defined by the user.  There are really no hard and fast rules that define QRP.  

Some hams think real QRP is less than 1 watt.

I think that generally hams think QRP is anything less than 5 watts.

Heck there are some hams who think 1500 watts is QRP.

Go figure.

Dick  AD4U
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W7KB
Member

Posts: 54




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« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2010, 09:35:24 AM »

If your transceiver,the IC-7200 is set at 5 watts,it is at QRP power level.The standard of 5 watts for QRP is common for contesting,awards,etc.to mean 5 watts output by ruling.But how do we define QRP?.If I am running my Icom 703+(a QRP rig)at 10 watts,I am running QRP.There is no output level set in stone to define QRP.Wikipedia defines QRP as 5W CW or 10W PEP SSB.How does one define QRO?..25W?50W?100W?500W?1KW?..You may hear me on the airwaves signing off as a QRP station.My 703+ will be run at a QRO power level of 10 watts to some,QRP level to others.It's all about the antenna deployed and your ERP that really matters most!.73!..W7KB
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AJ4MJ
Member

Posts: 48




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« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2010, 10:26:56 AM »

A lot of QRP requires someone to do the heavy lifting at the other end with:

A beam up high,
With low loss coax,
In a quiet location,
Using a high dynamic receiver,
Running 1000 watts because your suburban location has a S9 noise level.

This also applies to PSK as well.

If you are running 1000 watts on PSK, something is seriously wrong :-)
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AD6KA
Member

Posts: 2232




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2010, 01:06:09 PM »

AD4U
"QRP is defined by the user. There are really no hard and fast rules that define QRP."

I agree. For some, like me, I like the "minimalist approach" to ham radio for QRP. Sure, I can sit at my home station and dial the PROII down to 5 watts. That's QRP, sure

What **I** *prefer* to do is to take my K1, Rock Mite, or PSK20 and a 7 Ah SLA battery to the local park,(or when camping) and throw a wire antenna up into a tree, and see who I can contact. I work many with similar setups (albeit few in a park except on Field Day!) if I operate at the suggested QRP freqs.

"A lot of QRP requires someone to do the heavy lifting at the other end with:
A beam up high,
With low loss coax,
In a quiet location,
Using a high dynamic receiver,
Running 1000 watts because your suburban location has a S9 noise level"

And you hang out at QRP "watering holes" with that rig running a kilowatt? For what purpose? Because you enjoy "heavy lifting"?

I'm not criticizing, I'd love to have such a setup, especially the tower & Yagi on top of a mountain in Colorado! I also enjoy RTTY Contesting, and run high power for that. There so much to enjoy in ham radio.

Arguing over what is "Real" QRP or "Real" this or that is silly.
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