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Author Topic: Remoting a PC power supply, possible?  (Read 514 times)
VE3TMT
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Posts: 370




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« on: October 01, 2007, 10:26:47 AM »

Just tossing around an idea. My rig suffers terribly from noise generated by the shack computer which is located just under the operating table. The noise is particularly bad on 80m and terrible on 160 with 10 over 9 noise levels. If I shut the computer off it goes away. So it is either the hard drive or power supply. I thought about moving the entire computer into the furnace room behind the shack and just run extension cables for the monitor, keyboard and mouse, but if I needed to access this PC this would get bothersome, and those cables aren't cheap. So then I thought about removing the power supply from the PC and storing in the furnace room. I can feed it directly with AC there and run a single multi-conductor cable into the PC under the desk. Any thoughts on this?

Max
VE3TMT
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2007, 07:14:11 AM »

While it is possible, I think it is very impractical. The voltage drop from the long wires would probably raise all kinds of problems with the operation of the computer.

If the computer is a 'homebrew" you probably have a shielding problem that can be helped with a decent new, shielded case. It could also be the display. I'd put torroids on both power cables and the video cable first and see if that solves the problem.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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VE3TMT
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Posts: 370




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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2007, 01:28:39 PM »

Thanks for the input Lon, I may look into getting another case and or better power supply.

73,
Max
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W3LK
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2007, 03:52:38 PM »

You need to find out where the RFi is actually coming from before you go buying or changing anything.

If the computer is more than five years old, I buy a new one instead.

FWIW, I have been using Macs for years and I have yet to have one give me interference problems and my computer(s) sit two feet away from the rigs.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3714




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« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2007, 05:49:11 PM »

hi,

all my pc (all off lease used from ibm)
are all metal cased and I do not have any problems.

http://www-132.ibm.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=2576395&storeId=1&catalogId=-840&langId=-1

free shipping, just pay sales tax, win xp pro included.

73 james
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WW5AA
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Posts: 2088




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« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2007, 01:29:43 PM »

It might not be the PS. Have you checked to see if it is the monitor? You might also try lining the case and PS with aluminum foil. The aluminum foil worked on my last computer which had a plastic case. Good luck.

73, de Lindy
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WA7NCL
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Posts: 625




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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2007, 07:26:41 AM »

I have found laptops to be very quiet.  Except for the external powersupplies.  You can put the external power supplies in a metal box and add ferrites and feedthrough caps and make a very quiet system.

I have also found that the external displays on desktops are often the culprit.  If you are like me, I use donated CRTs.  I have a lot of them.  Add ferrites to the cables and mix and match until I find one that is quiet.

Lastly, I have found that making sure the case you have fits together well.  If you have been tinkering with the computer, make sure all the seams and flanges are still fitting together well.  Make sure all the sheet metal screws are tightened down, etc.
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VE3EFJ
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2007, 11:56:15 AM »

Are you SURE its the computer PS? If your computer is in a metal case, its not the most likely cause of your problem.

In many instances I've found the source of the problem to be the monitor and/or its connect cable. This is often the case if you are using a glass tube display.

Try this before you get too set on blaming the "computer":

- power up as usual
- power the monitor off
- disconnect the monitor cable from the computer

If this results in a substantial decrease in RFI, then at least we know what we're dealing with. I really believe you haven't tested far enough to name a cause just yet.


Wayne
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