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Author Topic: Slow writer, what to do.  (Read 3207 times)
LB5KE
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Posts: 141




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« on: May 25, 2010, 02:31:32 PM »

I have a slight problem, and that is. I can write down Morse sent at 12wpm but once speed is increasing it's harder, even if i can recognize characters at higher speed. I feel that getting it down on paper is more of an obstacle than copying at speed.
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KE4ILG
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Posts: 149




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« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2010, 02:49:36 PM »

I feel certain that with more on-air experience you will be able to easily copy at higher rates than you are at now.  All of us seem to go through this or similar difficulties.  As your ability to copy faster code you will anticipate what the other station will be sending and write words before they are sent.  Unless you have a real disability you will over come this problem shortly if you continue to make on-air contacts.  Do you think I emphasized getting on the air?  Well the "Dr." prescribes   one or two QSO' per day and call me in a month.  hihi, cu on the bands, 73 Mike ke4ilg.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2765




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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2010, 03:34:14 PM »

As your experience increases, you'll be copying the whole QSO in your head and just making notes as to the other station's call sign, QTH, name, and the other data.  I still keep a paper log - force of habit - and once I have the line filled out, I just jot down notes related to what is sent. 

73
Pat K7KBN
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2010, 04:47:42 PM »

Use a keyboard.  Or voice recognition software.


73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2010, 05:06:37 AM »

*Typing with a keyboard might be the faster method for you.  Notepad, Wordpad or the like on the computer is one way to do this.

*Don't print, for speed when using pen/pencil and paper, use *cursive* longhand writing, which is faster. 

*Keep practicing the art of copying in your head so that one day you won't have to write every character or every word down, just jot notes for the essentials:  Callsign, name, location, etc. 


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AA4PB
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Posts: 12691




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« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2010, 07:27:49 AM »

When you have a voice QSO do you write down every word, or do you just make a few notes? No reason it should be any different with CW. Once you are able to recognize most of the smaller words and Q signals as complete structures rather than individual characters then you'll have plenty of time to write down the important stuff. For example, most ops can probably recognize "the" at over 50WPM even though they don't copy CW at anywhere near that speed.

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LB5KE
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Posts: 141




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« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2010, 11:37:16 AM »

Thanks for the keyboard tips guys, already an improvement for me.   I suppose i also should increase "real life" cw, instead of computer generated code.
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AE4RV
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2010, 09:21:16 AM »

http://www.sense-lang.org/typing/

This site is useful for improving touch typing skills. I have to use a keyboard over 18 WPM. Still working on hearing 4+ character words as a unit  Sad
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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2010, 01:56:28 PM »

http://www.sense-lang.org/typing/

This site is useful for improving touch typing skills. I have to use a keyboard over 18 WPM. Still working on hearing 4+ character words as a unit  Sad

Or you could use software that rates your performance while you practice Morse code and touch typing at the same time.


73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20547




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« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2010, 06:06:23 PM »

I never write anything down when I'm working CW -- and it's a good thing, because I can't write very fast, either.

I work CW at 50 wpm quite often (like almost every day) and obviously I can't write 50 wpm.  I can type faster than that, but don't bother doing that, either.

I just jot down the other station's call, name and location, maybe take a few notes of interest, and log the band and time.

Why bother writing anything down?  There's no "test" at the end to see if you got his dog's name or whatever. Cheesy

This isn't a new concept: After 45 years in ham radio, and operating CW the whole time, I never wrote anything down.
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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2010, 09:52:18 PM »

I never write anything down when I'm working CW

Why bother writing anything down?  There's no "test" at the end to see if you got his dog's name or whatever. Cheesy

This isn't a new concept: After 45 years in ham radio, and operating CW the whole time, I never wrote anything down.

After 45 years in ham radio, it's time to realize that other people may have slightly different interests than you do.  There is obviously nothing wrong with being sloppy and just writing down whichever odd piece of information you actually get, if that's what you want to do.  But others may be interested in accuracy.  What's wrong with that ?

73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code
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NG0K
Member

Posts: 335




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« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2010, 07:41:16 AM »

I'm not fast at CW either.  My ragchew speed is only 15-20wpm because I'm more of a listener than a talker and don't transmit that often.    But when I do, I jot down only a few notes to get the jist of the message so I can comment.    If I only get  "ic746 and dipole on gnd", as opposed to,  "rig hr is ic746 at 100w es ant hr is dipole for 80m fed with twinlead and laying on the gnd", then no big deal   Grin
73, Doug 
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73, Doug - NG0K
AA1BN
Member

Posts: 56




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« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2010, 12:56:21 PM »

Re:
"There is obviously nothing wrong with being sloppy"

Well..... OK, then! Let's get on with it! I've always been a sloppy SOB anyway.
I don't do CW slow, and I don't do it fast... I'm kinda half-fast at it.

Kiddin' aside....

We don't write down each and every word in a vocal conversation, so why is it
necessary to do so while conversing in Morse Code?

I love your program, Sigurd. You did a fine job of it and it's helped me as well as
others, I'm sure; Your contributions are a real credit to the hobby!

Helping to keep the hobby alive is great, since the Internet has been taking a lot of
would-be ham hobbyists away.... but getting too serious about how diligent we are
when conversing, only adds to a problem of hams avoiding CW for fear of being
chastised for failing to be "perfect".

I'm far (real, real far) from perfect, and I'd never get back into the hobby if
I thought I was going to be judged with every contact...

There are times that we can get a big blank while listening, and we can miss entire
paragraph of CW dialog while we choke on a word we can't figure out.... it happens.
It happens if we try too hard to get each and every word exactly right.

But when we relax and just listen to the conversation, we're hearing what the other
guy's saying in the context of the conversation. We're not fighting to hear every word,
since it's the context of dialog that matters. It becomes no different than a vocal
conversation in the back yard. I can't drink beer and write down everything my
neighbor is saying at the same time. I'll spill the beer, and that's a mortal sin.

Really..... Isn't that what this part of the hobby should really be about? Just normal
individuals yakkin' about daily stuff, but using CW to do it?



(I dunno.... maybe not... I need a beer)


73.
 
 
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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2010, 04:10:52 PM »

I was just pointing out that although I don't think X is important to me, X may still be important or interesting to others.

While it may not matter to a skilled ham what is recorded from a casual ragchew, it IS important to those who are learning. 

There is a difference between deciding that the name other op's dog is irrelevant and not understanding that a dog was mentioned.


73
LB3KB Sigurd
Just Learn Morse Code
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AB9NZ
Member

Posts: 176




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« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2010, 05:02:25 PM »

Although we're constantly warned to put down our pencils, I think writing down the code is actually a helpful part of the learning process. It's funny, but my magic pencil can copy both an incredibly bad  fist and deep down in the noise. As we build speed it's easy to forget how hard it is to head copy slow or improperly spaced code. By the time  they get to the end of a long word you can forget what the beginning was.
   Take very good care guys, de Tom, AB9NZ
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