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Author Topic: Slow writer, what to do.  (Read 3356 times)
AA1BN
Member

Posts: 56




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« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2010, 06:06:52 PM »

Re:
"There is a difference between deciding that the name other op's dog is irrelevant,
and not understanding that a dog was mentioned
."

Excellent point, Sigurd! I never thought of it that way.

But my point was, that I would have missed the balance of the conversation
by the time I figured out that the other op named his dog "irrelevant".


(But -you- did make a good point, and well worth considering!)

 
73.

John - aa1bn
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WX7G
Member

Posts: 6131




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« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2010, 04:48:57 AM »

Learn to write faster.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2813




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« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2010, 09:18:52 AM »

Cut off your fingers so you can write in shorthand... Grin
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




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« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2010, 12:00:48 PM »



We don't write down each and every word in a vocal conversation, so why is it
necessary to do so while conversing in Morse Code?
\

My feeling, exactly.  If I work someone on "phone," or even over the telephone, or face-to-face, I certainly don't write down what they say.  Why would I do it for a CW contact?  Makes no sense to me.
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AD7WN
Member

Posts: 113




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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2010, 05:47:23 PM »

I suspect that the real problem is that you are trying too hard to write each character immediately as it is received.  The stress from doing this will make many folks freeze up when they should be writing.

A technique that was once taught by the U.S. Army (1952) was to practice writing (or typing) a few characters behind.  Even copying two characters behind will let a person write smoothly what was sent while, at the same time, listening to what is being sent at the present.  Copying behind takes a little practice but is not very hard to learn.

How fast can you learn to copy in this way?  If you use block printing, 25 wpm becomes a challenge.  If you can write in cursive, speeds as great as 35 wpm can be readily learned.  Speeds above 35 wpm may require using a mill (typewriter), or you could use a computer with a word-processing page opened.

Hope this helps, 73 de John/AD7WN
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




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« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2010, 07:27:26 PM »

I suspect that the real problem is that you are trying too hard to write each character immediately as it is received.  The stress from doing this will make many folks freeze up when they should be writing.

A technique that was once taught by the U.S. Army (1952) was to practice writing (or typing) a few characters behind.  Even copying two characters behind will let a person write smoothly what was sent while, at the same time, listening to what is being sent at the present.  Copying behind takes a little practice but is not very hard to learn.


But just listening and understanding everything that's sent also works just fine.  Who in the world writes down everything that is spoken to them?  I never miss anything, without writing anything down.  I guess this is an acquired skill, but an important one.

In CW contests, I'm often 3-4-5 contacts behind in logging, but I don't recall ever not getting a call into the log just fine.

The trick is to not place emphasis on "copying on paper," which is ridiculous.  Nobody needs to copy anything on paper.  If you get it, you got it.  Log it later, or if it's not important, don't log it at all.  Who  cares?
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3894




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« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2010, 04:51:27 PM »

WB2WIK: "Just listening and understanding everything that's sent also works just fine.  Who in the world writes down everything that is spoken to them?  I never miss anything, without writing anything down.  I guess this is an acquired skill, but an important one."

Yes, it is. It's a form of short-term memory. Ever notice how some people can repeat a 10 digit phone number from hearing it once, while others have to break it into pieces?

WB2WIK: "In CW contests, I'm often 3-4-5 contacts behind in logging, but I don't recall ever not getting a call into the log just fine.

The trick is to not place emphasis on "copying on paper," which is ridiculous.  Nobody needs to copy anything on paper.  If you get it, you got it.  Log it later, or if it's not important, don't log it at all.  Who  cares?
[/quote]

I care!

But it depends on the kind of operating being done. In a contest like Sweepstakes, the exchange is long and complicated, and it's important to get it down right. In a casual QSO, not so much.

In fact one of the joys of the casual CW QSO is to be able to lean back and have a conversation without writing anything down at all.

OTOH, I spent many a night years ago handling record traffic using Morse Code, and it all had to be written down and gotten right. That was a real skill-developer!

The main point is that being a good Morse Code op is a set of skills, not just one. The truly skilled op can write it down or "copy in the noggin" or a combination of both, depending on what's appropriate.

Some tricks I learned to get it down on paper:

1) Learn to copy behind, as explained by others

2) Try different writing implements (pencil, felt-tip, ball point) and different paper (lined, unlined, legal pad, paper turned 90 degrees, etc.)

3) Learn to block-print the Signal Corps way. Reduces strokes by a considerable margin.

4) Type it!

73 de Jim, N2EY
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