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Author Topic: Licensing Tests  (Read 2225 times)
KC2YQY
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« on: May 28, 2010, 02:44:49 PM »

Hello
I am a newbie to Amateur Radio. I have a question about the various tests. In questions involving numbers and equations in the study guide tests, are these the same questions as will be found on the test? In others words, do the numbers change? Thanks. Hope to be on the air soon. -Bill-
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N2EY
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« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2010, 06:39:49 PM »

In questions involving numbers and equations in the study guide tests, are these the same questions as will be found on the test? In others words, do the numbers change?

If the study guide uses the exact question and answer pool used by the VEs, the answer is no, the numbers do not change. What you see in the published pools, and in online practice exams, are the exact Q&A, and numbers, which are used on the actual exams.

The only thing that may change is the order of the answer choices.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N3DF
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2010, 06:58:23 AM »

Just like the FAA exams that airline pilots take!
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Neil N3DF
N2EY
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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2010, 03:39:24 PM »

Just like the FAA exams that airline pilots take!

I read somewhere that FAA went to that style of written exam before FCC did.

However, there's a lot more to getting an FAA license than the written tests.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K6LHA
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2010, 08:41:55 PM »

Just like the FAA exams that airline pilots take!

I read somewhere that FAA went to that style of written exam before FCC did.

I'm surprised you don't know for sure.  <shrug>

Quote
However, there's a lot more to getting an FAA license than the written tests.

Yes, there is a minimum number of FLYING hours required including permission from a certified instructor to fly solo.  In 1963 that cost me $12 an hour dual.  I passed the written general aviation (so-called 'private pilot') test and have that digitized.  Couldn't afford any more dual time then.

Also in 1963, if having passed a solo flight under instructor permission, one could fly themselves as a "student" anywhere by themselves.  One in my ground school class was a contractor as employment and flew himself all over the southland, to Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico with just a "student" license.

Flying school for me was "Skyways" at VNY and always 16Left, hardly ever got to use 16R (the longer of the two).   Cheesy

Before the flight instructor let me use a civil airways radio on 21W (a Cessna 150), he insisted I had to get a 3rd Class Restricted Radiotelephone license (no test, just the form).  Took a lot of convincing of Skyways that my already-old First 'Phone (granted in 1956) was "higher" than the 'Third or that I'd already used my First in transmitting on avionics equipment in the electronics industry.   Grin     Grin     Grin

Now I live about a mile from BUR where Lockheed used to be located.  It wasn't until Lockheed buildings were all torn down that I found out the famous Skunk Works were located there since WWII.  Building 82 and immediately accessible from Winona Ave. and Hollywood Way.  Used to see that building nearly every day for years and thought it was just another Lockheed building!.    Cheesy

Sill got my Jepp plotter and a bunch of out-dated sectionals.    Smiley

73, Len K6LHA
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K6LHA
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« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2010, 10:41:18 AM »

Hello
I am a newbie to Amateur Radio. I have a question about the various tests. In questions involving numbers and equations in the study guide tests, are these the same questions as will be found on the test? In others words, do the numbers change? Thanks. Hope to be on the air soon. -Bill-

Bill, to check on questionable questions at a test session, you can go to www.ncvec.org and see all the test element questions and answers that are supposed to be selected for any amateur radio license test.

The NCVEC originate all questions and answers.  NCVEC website has downloads available free for all that material.

In my limited experience of taking my only amateur radio test three years ago, the questions and answers of all three test elements - as pre-selected by the ARRL VEC - are exactly the same as those I printed out from NCVEC downloads as applicable for that test date.

73, Len K6LHA
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AA4HA
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« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2010, 09:24:58 AM »

When you show up for a test session we (the VE's) will pick one of several different exam booklets to give you you for your test. Each different booklet will have a different combination of test questions that are taken from the pool. There are a certain number of each test topics that are covered in each booklet. For example, you will not find a test booklet that is loaded with nothing but mathematics, nor will you find one that is just simple text answers.

We do not determine the questions that will go into the test and most VE's just use the standard issued test booklets for a session. We do have an option of using the "Exam Maker" software that will build a custom test booklet but retain the ability for us to use the grading keys. There are questions that may show up in multiple exam booklets but the answers will be arranged in a different order (A instead of C for example).

If you fail a test and ask to take it over again in the same test session (and the VE's are ok with that and we have time) we will issue you a different exam booklet that will have different questions. It does not cost you any more to retake a different test in a session or for you to take two or three tests (technician, general, extra). Normally the fee you pay is for the test session and not how many tests you take. (at least that is how it should be in ARRL sessions).

Hope that helps,

Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W3HF
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« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2010, 06:36:37 PM »

If you fail a test and ask to take it over again in the same test session (and the VE's are ok with that and we have time) we will issue you a different exam booklet that will have different questions. It does not cost you any more to retake a different test in a session or for you to take two or three tests (technician, general, extra). Normally the fee you pay is for the test session and not how many tests you take. (at least that is how it should be in ARRL sessions).
That's not quite true, at least for ARRL VEs. It's true that for one test fee, an applicant can take one each of the Technician, General and Extra tests. But if the applicant fails one of these and wants to retest, under ARRL VEC rules, that constitutes a separate test and thus the applicant must pay another fee.

See page 56 of the current (2008) ARRL VE Manual, under "Retesting", which says:
Quote from: ARRL VE Manual
An applicant who fails an element at an ARRL/VEC-coordinated session may retake that element at the same session, if (1) the administering VE Team has a different version of that element, which the applicant hasn't taken; (2) the VE Team has the time and resources and is willing to administer the additional version; and (3) the applicant pays an additional test fee. Again, a retest test fee charge is only required if an element is retaken, after being failed at your session.
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K4DPK
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« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2010, 09:13:53 PM »

Bill,

The question you asked suggests your plan is to memorize the numerical answers and take the test.  That's a pretty silly plan, if you ask me, because it'd be easier to study the material and learn how the answers were obtained, than to try and remember all those numbers in whatever order.

Also, you'll get some longterm benefit from knowing a little about electrical math.  That would come in handy later on, in case you want to actually learn something and expand your knowledge about electronics and ham radio.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk

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