Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What should we call ourselves?  (Read 2461 times)
OLLIEOXEN27
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« on: June 10, 2010, 10:19:27 AM »

I like to think of myself as a radio telegraph operator instead of all the other terms that denote confusion or indicate possible embarassment and avoidance. Ham is too generic, and denotes preconceptions and cliches. Calling myself a CW op or 'into morse code' minimizes the significance of what I do.

When did we start calling ourselves CW ops(?) since most of the population has no idea what that means to begin with. Can't we better promote the avocation if other people better understand exactly what we do?

oli
Logged
OLLIEOXEN27
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2010, 10:29:01 AM »

Think about it.



Oli,  Radio Telegrapher
Logged
KC9HOZ
Member

Posts: 103




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2010, 11:15:24 AM »

I don't have a good suggestion for a replacement term, but I've always considered "CW" one of the most mis-used terms in amateur radio (think about how many hams have posted here looking for advice on how to 'learn CW'...  Really? Learn CW?)

Have to confess though that I use the term just like everyone else does. Grin

Scott
kc9hoz
Logged
WX7G
Member

Posts: 6134




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2010, 01:27:23 PM »

I tell non hams that I do amateur radio telegraphy.

As to the term CW; the current usage among amateur radio operators is as a synonym for Morse Code. Yes, it used to stand for Continuous Wave but for that for we now say continuous carrier. The term OOK CW for ON OFF KEYED CW is sometimes used for CW although I wish it was not.

When someone says "he learned CW" I believe it is proper useage of the English language.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2010, 08:44:49 PM by DAVE CUTHBERT » Logged
KQ7W
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2010, 01:44:19 PM »

human being
Logged
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2010, 01:51:50 PM »

I tell people that I enjoy my hobby of ham radio--I get to talk with people all over the world and can build some of the equipment I use.

I also enjoy my hobby of making vases on a potter's wheel.

73
Bob
Logged
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2010, 08:40:02 PM »

Well, I never really felt the need to explain it to anyone or catalog what I do.

I just do it.

If they ask, I explain it.

If not, I don't.

Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3894




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2010, 05:05:05 AM »

I tell people I'm an amateur radio operator. If they want more detail, I tell them I use Morse Code on the air and build most of my own equipment. I also tell them that there are lots of other things amateurs do, but that those two are my favorites.

---

"CW" means "on-off keyed Morse Code radiotelegraphy" because two syllables are easier and faster than thirteen.

btw, "CW" is one of those terms whose original/literal meaning is all but gone in favor of another one. This isn't unusual. For example, we may describe something or someone as "cool" regardless of temperature. Animal and other words such as cat, dog, fox, pig, cow, honey, sugar, baby, hunk are applied to people as nouns or adjectives. Product and company names such as Xerox, Kleenex, Coke become generic. Acronyms such as LASER, SONAR, RADAR become uncapitalized words of their own.

Sometimes the origins of a word or phrase are all but lost. I know where "take five" came from (it didn't originally mean "take 5 minutes") but how did "joe" come to mean "coffee"?

73 de Jim, N2EY

Logged
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2010, 06:03:33 AM »

Jim,

Excellent argument on the terminology.

"CW" it is.

I'll bet that occurred to you when you were relaxing in your jacuzzi after you get back from your trip in the winnebago.

So where did take five come from, other than Dave Brubeck?

73




Logged
NK6Q
Member

Posts: 202




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2010, 09:34:02 AM »

OK, straying from the topic slighty:

FYI: Dave Brubeck's "Take Five" is called that because it's in 5/4 tempo.  All you non-musical types can check it out on Wikipedia.

Most non-hams wouldn't know the term "CW" anyway.  I just tell them I do Morse Code. Why split hairs?

Bill in Pasadena

Logged
AA1BN
Member

Posts: 56




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2010, 10:56:00 AM »

OK, equally "straying from the topic slighty":

I just spent fifteen minutes typing out a great comment to you, and as
I got ready to post, I realized you said "split", not "spit".... making
my comment totally incoherent and out of context.

73 anyway.

John

Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3894




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2010, 12:01:40 PM »

So where did take five come from, other than Dave Brubeck?

Thanks for the kind words.

It comes from landline ("American") Morse Code, as do some other things. The code used on the wires was not identical to the code we use today on the air. Some letters are the same, others are different, and there were some extra symbols. Landline Morse also used spaced dits and three different length dahs (which is why mechanical semi-auto keys were common but fully-auto keys were not).

Some of the abbreviations of the wires survive even today.

We use "ES" as the abbreviation for "and" because dit..dididit is "&" in landline Morse

We use "SK" as the ending prosign because dididitdahdit   daaaaaah is "30" in landline Morse, and "30" was the WU numeric abbreviation for "end of work". (WU numerics gave us 73 and 88 too)

Dididididit doesn't mean the number 5 in landline Morse. It means the letter "P".

You can see where that leads......

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2010, 12:08:16 PM »

OK, straying from the topic slighty:

FYI: Dave Brubeck's "Take Five" is called that because it's in 5/4 tempo.  All you non-musical types can check it out on Wikipedia.

Most non-hams wouldn't know the term "CW" anyway.  I just tell them I do Morse Code. Why split hairs?

Bill in Pasadena



yes, and anyone (other than a dilettante) who actually knows who Dave Brubeck is should know why he called it "Take 5."

That classic work and Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" are tied for my favorite Jazz albums of all time, in any Jazz category.

I never get tired of listening to them.


Logged
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2010, 07:12:28 PM »

So where did take five come from, other than Dave Brubeck?

It comes from landline ("American") Morse Code...

Dididididit doesn't mean the number 5 in landline Morse. It means the letter "P".

You can see where that leads......

73 de Jim, N2EY

Cool!

I did not know that!

Logged
AB9NZ
Member

Posts: 177




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2010, 08:46:19 PM »

I like that Ollieoxen fella.  Radiotelegrapher, one word.
     de Tom AB9NZ
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!