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Author Topic: FT-1802  (Read 2218 times)
AB8CC
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« on: June 16, 2010, 07:49:18 PM »

I have a Yaesu FT-1802, which exhibits a problem with the memory if the radio has been disconnected from a power source for a short period of time. It loses it's memory completely and each time I have to do a full reset and reprogram in all my information. Is there a battery within the radio that be used to hold it's memory? Maybe a lose connection? Anyone have this problem with an 1802. It seems to only happen if the radio has been disconnected for a couple of days.
I like the radio but hate the problem. I could drill a hole through the cabinet, insert an eye-bolt with a strong chain and use it as a boat anchor, but I'd rather try to save it if I can. Help!
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KD6KWZ
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2010, 08:28:12 PM »

That's the typical signs of the internal memory battery having died. It's the downside of the digital age.

Maybe some of these rig makers could use NVRAM. No loss of program that way.That's the typical description of the battery
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N5VTU
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2010, 08:36:31 PM »

I agree with the other poster...sure sounds like a dead memory battery.  I think the FT-1802 has only been out 4 or 5 years.  I'm surprised it's already having battery problems.  I have an old Yaesu FT-411 that I bought new in 1989 that is still on the original lithium battery.  I guess they don't build 'em like they used to.
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KD6KWZ
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2010, 08:47:15 PM »

Yes, I was also shocked to see how short that battery life was.  Shocked
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K7AAT
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2010, 09:20:36 PM »


  While I can not say with 100% certainty,  I'd strongly suggest that the FT-1802 does NOT have a memory backup battery.  Every late model radio that I know of in the past several years was designed with non-volatile memory;  no battery needed.  I'd be real surprised if it was not the same.   No where in the operations manual,  or the Technical Supplement manual can I find any reference to a memory battery.  While I may have missed it,  I could not find one in the schematic, either.   I think the original poster's problem may be elsewhere in the radio.

  Ed   K7AAT
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K4YZ
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2010, 05:14:43 AM »

Greetings...

Has your -1802 been modified for out-of-band operation?  I've found that several of the Yaesu/Vertex radios develop several unique quirks once they've been mod'ed for OOB operation.

My FT-2600M would dump all memories when the car re-started if you didn't shut the rig off first then turn it on again after the engine was running.  And the -1802 has to have all programming parameters re-set in VFO mode if you shut the radio off then turn it on again, which is annoying since it loses offset (it won't automatically select repeat offset), shift frequency, last CTCSS tone used, and sets itself to 12.5kHz steps.  (The memory channels remain involatile, however)

Still, overall, I prefer my Yaesu/Vertex gear to anything else I've used in the last 10 years...

73

Steve, K4YZ
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KE3WD
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2010, 03:48:34 PM »

Later rigs may utilize a memory capacitor instead of a memory battery cell. 

Find and download the service manual or schematic for the rig and have a look. 

Memory Capacitor, if present, may be failing.  One sign is the juice coming out of the bottom of it, which may not be evident until the cap is unsoldered and examined, but that is not always the case, sometimes the memcap looks fine but does not work so fine. 

Once you locate it, the DMM set to DCV, across the + and - terminals of the cap with the rig powered down should show if it is holding the voltage or not. 

Always replace the MemCap with same spec memory capacitor as original.  If you want "better" then select one with same mfd and voltage specification, but a 105 degree C temp rating (a lot of originals may be "only" 85 deg. C rated). 

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