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Author Topic: Soundproofing a Ceiling  (Read 9195 times)
W8CAR
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« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2010, 02:20:51 PM »

There are several companies that make a sound deadening drywall product. They 'sandwich' a sound barrier in the drywall. I have no experience with it but have seen remodeling TV shows where they use it on adjoining walls or ceilings. Probably a very cheap fix if you can mud a tape joint ! A quick check finds it available in 5/8 inch thickness

Dan W8CAR
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N2CJ
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« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2010, 05:03:27 PM »

the key on sound proofing is mass and mechanical isolation.

If you can put in a drop ceiling, that helps a lot, even if only a few inches below the true ceiling.  The key is that the ceiling support has to be isolated from the true ceiling as much as possible (e.g. no nailing it to the side walls.. there should be a gap, filled with a compliant rubber gasket.  They have specially designed hangar wire fixtures for this application that have a sort of rubberized support, to prevent the vibration from being transmitted through the wires. 

This answer is exactly correct.

Check out this link: http://www.soundproofingamerica.com/ceiling-soundproofing.asp
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VK2FXXX
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« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2010, 07:25:44 AM »

My 2 cents
I have built several sound proof walls and ceilings as this is part of my job as a drywall plasterer.
W6RMK has it correct. Mechanical isolation and mass.
If you go online to a drywall manufacturing company website ,you should be able to download their tech manual, which will have several acoustic rated ceiling systems ,and construction details.From there you can work out which is best for your needs,and be able to estimate material needs ,and use the right terminology when ordering the material. Hire a sheetlifter machine when screwing up the drywall to the ceiling .Your back will appreciate it.
I cant really help with companies to recommend as Im in Australia.
Enjoy
73 Brendan
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NJ3U
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Posts: 123




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« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2010, 01:11:47 PM »

Heil headset is in order for this problem, as well check the HVAC ducts as most likely the room above is sharing the same supply and return paths.

The poster that mentioned the coupling of drywall to the joists is exactly right, google common wall noise condo design for ideas since this is a very common complaint of apartment dwellers.

I must say that the Heils are FB and have saved me many times from "hearing" it from the XYL.
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KF7KMZ
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« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2010, 10:55:11 PM »

Try putting styrofoam cups upside-down on the ceiling to absorb the sound waves therefore reducing or eliminating the sound.
Cheap, effective.

Good Luck and 73's,
Henry
KF7KMZ
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N6JSX
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Posts: 217




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« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2010, 01:51:31 PM »

My office is directly under the living room. I have found a product at Menards (and other places) that is often referred to as "SOUND BOARD". Very much like dry-wall but far more dense, claiming to deaden the sound some 30dB (but no distance specified).  I've seen this used in home theater and baby>teenager rooms to allow the rest of the house to live normal lives.

I will be putting this sound board on my ceiling (and since I have extra pick insulation I'll file in the rafters with this too. After that the family can suffer my infrequent HAMming - I'm the master of my house, when I get her permission.

Off subject: if your wife is looking at TOUCH lamps, steer here away quick. They will flicker like crazy on various HF bands with/without an amp at 100W. Ya touch lamps great for bedrooms - not!   
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AH6RR
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« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2010, 10:19:08 AM »

Ron if your are still following this find a insulation company that blows foam and have them do the ceiling that should do it just fine.
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N8CMQ
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« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2010, 07:15:55 PM »

All the sound proofing is for naught when you have shared heating/cooling ducts.
Even if you have separate runs from the furnace, the sound can propagate through the furnace.
I had the unfortunate situation of being in the same room as the furnace, never did get rid of the problem till the divorce...
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 976




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« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2010, 07:39:19 PM »

Any solution other than operating CW or PSK31 is going to cost a lot of money.
You're married, and if you plan to remain so, when she's in bed, that's where you should be, unless you snore a lot! Wink
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