Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: When was everyone licensed???.....  (Read 10392 times)
AB4D
Member

Posts: 298


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2010, 06:29:28 AM »

I was first licensed in 1993. I passed the Technican in September, and the license (KE4IAQ) did not show up until about two weeks before Christmas.  The wait seemed like forever.
Logged
N4KZ
Member

Posts: 599




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2010, 12:22:01 PM »

I took my novice exam in December 1968 when I was a high school freshman. The novice ticket came in early February 1969. Six months later, I upgrade to general because I was chomping to get into the general bands for DX chasing. I worked 50 countries on 15m as a novice -- in about a three-month period. Yes, putting up a 3-element monoband yagi at 45 feet helped that cause. Got my general in September 1969 and went back a year later and passed the advanced exam. (See August 1997 QST - "Thanks, Barry" for that story.) I took the extra exam in 1979 at the Detroit FCC office. All of my exams, except the novice, were in front of FCC examiners because that's all there was. Volunteer examiners came a bit later. The trip to take the general was fun because three of went together -- my elmer and a buddy. We all passed that day. We got our generals and my elmer got his advanced. A year later, I secured an excused absence from school and rode the Greyhound by myself to the federal building in downtown Louisville and got my advanced. Then I had a big delay in getting the license in the mail -- remember, no instant upgrades in 1970 -- while the FCC lost my paperwork. Then I ran into Barry Goldwater on the air, told him of my long wait for my new ticket -- and he had his secretary call the FCC the next day on my behalf and got it all straightened out and I got an apology for the FCC for the debacle. 

I've been active on the air continuously from Feb. 9, 1969 to present. I've lived in 14 residences since being first licensed and had an HF station on the air from all 14. And that includes using the gutter on the side of an apartment building in Sterling Heights, Mich. Actually, it wasn't a bad antenna. Made lots of 40m CW contacts with it, including working the Marshall Islands one morning. Not bad for 100 watts and a gutter.

73, N4KZ
Logged
AE4RV
Member

Posts: 963


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2010, 12:28:31 PM »

"Then I ran into Barry Goldwater on the air, told him of my long wait for my new ticket -- and he had his secretary call the FCC the next day on my behalf and got it all straightened out and I got an apology for the FCC for the debacle."

Fantastic!
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2010, 08:00:04 PM »

Took Novice test at High School in December 1959, (K7LBQ was the "VE").  Then took Conditional test in February 1960 in the workshop of a TV repair place two blocks from my folks' house in Las Vegas.  Both the Novice and the Conditional tickets took 7 weeks to arrive.

Upgraded from Conditional to General at the FCC office in Los Angeles at the same time I took the First Class Commercial Radiotelephone and Second Class Commercial Radiotelegraph tests in the summer of 1960 - must have been July.  For those who ask why I didn't take the Extra at the same time: simple.  You had to have been licensed for at least two years as a General or Advanced before you could even apply to take the Extra.  Conditional didn't count.

Upgraded to First Class Commercial Radiotelegraph in 1963 while on active duty in the Navy.  We handled a lot of commercial traffic for a time while in 7th Fleet and with letters from the CO of USS Kitty Hawk, endorsed up the line, FCC had no problem in my taking the test.

Then as an afterthought, I upgraded to Extra in 1975 at the FCC office in Portland OR.
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: July 07, 2010, 03:32:05 AM »

Took Novice test at High School in December 1959, (K7LBQ was the "VE").  Then took Conditional test in February 1960 in the workshop of a TV repair place two blocks from my folks' house in Las Vegas.  Both the Novice and the Conditional tickets took 7 weeks to arrive.

Upgraded from Conditional to General at the FCC office in Los Angeles at the same time I took the First Class Commercial Radiotelephone and Second Class Commercial Radiotelegraph tests in the summer of 1960 - must have been July.  For those who ask why I didn't take the Extra at the same time: simple.  You had to have been licensed for at least two years as a General or Advanced before you could even apply to take the Extra.  Conditional didn't count.

According to all the sources I've seen, Conditional did count towards the Extra experience requirement. But in the summer of 1960 you didn't have two years as a Conditional.

The Conditional was the same as the General, only issued by-mail using a volunteer examiner. Same tests, same privileges. And it counted for the Extra experience requirement.

However, there was a time when, if a Conditional and wanted an Advanced or Extra, the 13 wpm code and General theory had to be taken and passed all over again in front of an FCC examiner before you could even try the Advanced or Extra. That requirement eventually went away.

---

But Novice and Technician time did not count towards the Extra.

From the 1954 and 1962 ARRL License Manuals (same in both editions):

"12.21 Eligibility for license. Persons are eligible to apply for the various classes of amateur operator licenses as follows:

(a) Amateur Extra Class. Any citizen of the United States who either (1) at any time prior to the receipt of his application by the Commission has held for a period of two years or more a valid amateur operator license issued by the Federal Communications Commission, excluding licenses of the Novice and Technician classes, ..."

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
WA9BXB
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: July 07, 2010, 05:19:51 AM »

First licensed in 1962 as a Novice.  I have my original Novice license hanging on my ham shack wall.  Upgraded to General six months later by testing in downtown Chiago in front of an FCC Commissioner. Upgraded to Advanced class about five years later.  I have all my original licenses.
Logged
W0ZS
Member

Posts: 21




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2010, 12:44:10 PM »

Received my novice call, WN0LVU in 1974 when it was only a two year nonrenewable license. Let it lapse in 1976 to go to college, etc.  Plus I would have had to go to an FCC office in Sioux Falls, SD when the FCC would be there to give exams.
The FCC changed the rules and anyone with a novice license previously could apply for a permanent novice license.  My call then became KA0FPG
In 1980, I drove to the FCC office in St. Paul, MN and took the general class test and passed both the code and theory.  New call, N0CRK.
In 1981, I took my advanced test at a hamfest in Sioux City, IA and received the call, KD0TD.
In 1988, I took the Extra class and 21 WPM code test at the same hamfest in Sioux City, and received my call of WK0F.
In 2007, I decided to change my 2 x 1 call for a 1 x 2 and applied for a vanity call, W0ZS.  The WK0F was a difficult call for contest exchanges.  The DX got confused with a W and a K in the prefix.
Logged
AB7KT
Member

Posts: 155




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2010, 10:50:53 AM »

Got my Novice ticket in 1979. Took the test at school from one of my teachers. Me and a few other guys went into his office at lunch time to learn CW and study for the Novice exam. When we were ready, he gave us the test. I think about seven of us started. All but one got the Novice ticket. Maybe four of those got on the air. And I think I am the only one that remained active past a few years. The one guy that never got his ticket, today, works professionally in radio  Huh

Took my General about a year later from the FCC (1980 ?). It wasn't at an FCC office. They had an exam team give the exams once a month in the Pittsburgh area (I don't remember where it was held). I was able to use my new privliges right away with some kind of identifier, but I don't remember what it was. I know I owned a two meter rig before I was a General and took it with me to the test. On the way home I made an autopatch to tell my dad that I had passed.

I remained a general for something like 20 years. Then I took my Advanced and Extra under the VEC program.............But (as I always point out) I did have to pass the 20 wpm CW test for my Extra. I applied for a new callsign with both my Advanced and my Extra ticket since I no longer lived in my original call area.


I still have all the associated paperwork from all my licenses in my log book. I have my Novice ticket in a frame as well as my present license.
Logged

I thought you said this was a weak signal mode ? I HAVE a weak signal and he still didn't hear me.

FWIW: My callsign is AB8KT
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2010, 06:05:48 PM »

1955

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
NK6Q
Member

Posts: 202




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2010, 10:43:20 PM »

Got my Novice ticket in summer of 1967.  Based on Jim's story, I must have been one of the last of the 1-year novices.  I remember waiting by the mail slot in my house day after day for the license to arrive (I still have the original in my personal "treasure box", along with my General and Advanced tickets).

No VE's back in those days: in '68 I took a bus into NYC and the subway to lower Manhattan to the FCC building and then upstairs to the legendary (infamous?) 2-room office allocated for amateur exams.  I sat in one room behind an old schoolroom desk, a WWII-era set of headphones clamped to my ears, sweating to copy the 13 WPM code.  After passing the CW portion, I was handed a multiple-choice form for the written test.  The cranky old guy administering the exams would check the results with a manila card punched out in the appropriate locations.  When I passed, I celebrated by going out to lunch at the Automat for a hot dog and baked bean casserole.  The whole process (ordeal) made getting my license seem like a very big deal!

A year later I was back in that same musty office taking my written exam for my Advanced license.  Unfortunately, a year after that, my ardor for ham radio was eclipsed by my ardor for girls, and I left it all behind for over 40 years.  My recent experiences taking VE-sponsored exams (with no code), and finding many convenient locations to take them, is a lot easier than "schlepping" into the big city to take the tests, but it didn't have the same excitement and romance as my earlier experiences.  But that might be 'cause I'm old now.

Peace, Love, es 73's

Bill in Pasadena
Logged
K1XV
Member

Posts: 69




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2010, 12:01:23 PM »

Bill, NK6Q

I went before the same FCC examiner in New York City in late 1962.   My experience was the same as yours.  My test was near the Hudson River at Christopher Street.  I understand they later moved to Varick Street.  The grumpy guy's name was Jules Finkelman.   Remember his half glasses, green cigars and white shirts?   He terrorized us.

When I got my license, they had just finished the WA2 series of calls, and had started on WB2.  Somehow, they must have missed a few, and went back to pick them up, because I would up with WA2WXV a few weeks after some of my friends got WB2Axx calls.  They were all mad at me for somehow getting an older series call.

The license in those days was a thin small piece of paper.  As I recall, when you renewed your license you were supposed to send in the expired one, so not too many people kept their original license.  I let mine lapse in 1968 for much the same reasons as you.  As a result, I still have that little paper license issued on January 2, 1963.  Returned to amateur radio after an almost 30 year lapse in 1997.

Are you sure you and I are not the same person?

Ray   K1XV
Logged
W5LZ
Member

Posts: 477




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2010, 06:54:37 PM »

First license in 1966, Novice, WN5LZK.  Girls, college, and a job.  Not necessarily in that order.  Got back into the hobby 15 - 20 years later.  AA5AN (sounded like a barking dog in phonetics), then tried to get the 'old' call back.  Ended up with W5LZ.  Guess they figured I couldn't remember all those letters?  Whatever...
Paul
Logged
NK6Q
Member

Posts: 202




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2010, 09:23:26 PM »

Ray, K1XV

Oh yeah, Jules Finkelman. He was as skinny and dried up and ornery as an old barnyard rooster.  I think the guy must have been at least 500 years-old by the time I got around to visiting the Federal Building in Manhattan.

I still have all my original licenses, those small pieces of paper with the information typed in on a manual typewriter (it's really a hoot to see the typed lettering on my tickets slightly askew, probably from some poor office grunt barely hitting the shift key to make the capital letters).

The reason I still have all three (Novice: WN2BVN, General & Advanced: WA2HDS) was because I never renewed any of the licenses.  The Novice ticket was a one-year nonrenewable deal, I upgraded to General, and then Advanced.  Back then, renewal was every 4 years, I think, and you had to submit your logs as proof of being an active radio op. By the time my Advanced was coming up for renewal my interests had shifted elsewhere.

Lots of good memories.  Man oh man, times sure have changed! 

73

Bill in Pasadena

Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2010, 03:15:16 AM »


Oh yeah, Jules Finkelman. He was as skinny and dried up and ornery as an old barnyard rooster.  I think the guy must have been at least 500 years-old by the time I got around to visiting the Federal Building in Manhattan.

Hello, Bill - we are the same "vintage"! Except you got one of the last 1 year Novices and I got one of the first 2 year ones.

Here in Philly, The Examiner was Joe Welsh, nicknamed "Joe Squelch". And similar tales were told.

I found out much later that Joe was also a ham and a really nice guy away from work. But when he was on duty, he was All Business.

Plus when you're a teenager, anybody over about 24 seems ancient.

Back then, renewal was every 4 years, I think, and you had to submit your logs as proof of being an active radio op.

It was every 5 years in those days. 10 year licenses started in 1984, so by 1989 everybody had one. And then, for 5 years nobody's license expired!

Submitting logs in order to renew wasn't required. But back then renewal required signing a statement saying you'd been on the air at least 2 hours in the previous 3 months or 5 hours in the previous 12 months. And since logs of all amateur operation were required, the FCC could easily check. Not many hams would fib about something like that!

There was also a statement where you affirmed that you could still pass the Morse Code tests, both sending and receiving, at the time of the renewal application.

(I have some old License Manuals - they're interesting to read...)


Lots of good memories.  Man oh man, times sure have changed! 


If I haven't said it already (and even if I have): Welcome Back!

Yes, a lot has changed, but a lot is still the same.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
W4FID
Member

Posts: 133




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2010, 03:31:45 AM »

At the end of 1960 the 9th call area had issued all the W9 and then all the K9 calls and were about to issue the first WA9 calls. But at that time the novice was one year not renewable. So in addition to the normal amount of silent keys vacating calls there were some unused/expired calls from novices who didn't upgrade in the old pool. The FCC decided to use them up first and then go to the WA9 series. I got lucky and my novice exam was on their desk early in 1961 and got one of the reissued calls .......... Kn9FID. The original one was likely issued about 5 years earlier from what I can tell from asking guys who got the original series with calls near mine in sequence. So I got a 1 x 3 and "unearned seniority" by dumb luck.

Later I moved to the Detroit area in the early 70s but I kept an Illinois address as my operator's/primary station license official address and kept the 1 x 3. I got a secondary station license WB8TOY. When they did away with secondary station licenses in the late 70s I was able to choose and decided to keep the 1 x 3 call. A couple years later we moved back to suburban Chicago and I was glad I had kept the 1 x 3 9th area call --- plus it was way better on CW than the 8 call.

In 2005 I decided I was in FL for a couple years already and likely to stay for the rest of my life (as much as the good Lord allows us to decide anything) and got W4FID as a vanity call.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!