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Author Topic: When was everyone licensed???.....  (Read 9244 times)
W5CBO
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Posts: 68




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« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2010, 01:41:51 PM »

General since 1976
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AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2010, 04:20:42 PM »

Tech Plus 1994, Extra 1996.  Both in my teens.  Did the General, Advanced, Extra, and code back to back in two months.  We young club members raced to see who could pass all the tests fastest.  Judging from the other posts, the VEC made things lots easier.  Luck of age that I didn't have to trek into Manhattan, I suppose.  

Weren't there certain geographical requirements attached to the Conditional?  I thought that a Novice had to live beyond a certain distance from the FCC exam offices in order to sit the Conditional.  I can't remember where I read the following.  Supposedly some Novices went as far as registering their first license with a relative far from the FCC offices to avoid writing the General.  That person must've traveled far out of the way to get their ticket.

Were Conditionals eventually grandfathered into General?    

« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 06:03:02 PM by Jordan » Logged
N2EY
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Posts: 3858




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« Reply #32 on: July 30, 2010, 02:54:46 AM »

Weren't there certain geographical requirements attached to the Conditional?

Yes.

First off, there was never a requirement to start with Novice. Most hams did so because it was the easiest.

In the bad old days, FCC had exam points in major cities and would send traveling examiners to smaller cities. But there were still parts of the country where the distance to an FCC exam session was considerable.

Until 1954, the rule was that a ham had to live more than 125 miles "air-line" from an FCC exam site where exams were held at least 4 times a year to get a license "by mail". This included the Novice, Technician and Conditional. Advanced and Extra could not be earned by-mail.

Also, if the ham moved to within 125 miles of such a site, s/he had 90 days to show up and be retested by an FCC official, or lose the license.

In 1954 the distance requirement was reduced to 75 miles "air-line", and the retest-if-you-move requirement abolished. Also, all routine Novice and Technician were changed to "by-mail".

In 1964 the distance was increased to 175 miles "air-line" and the number of exam sites increased. Almost all of the area of the 48 states were then no longer "Conditional territory"

Supposedly some Novices went as far as registering their first license with a relative far from the FCC offices to avoid writing the General.  That person must've traveled far out of the way to get their ticket.

Depends on the situation.

It might be closer to a relative's house than to an FCC exam point, particularly when you consider travel distance rather than "air-line" distance. It might cost a lot less and be a lot more convenient to go to the relative's house than to go to the big city for an exam (exam sessions were held weekday mornings at prescheduled times; a by-mail exam session could be held whenever convenient for the volunteer examiner and the ham being tested).

Were Conditionals eventually grandfathered into General?

Yes. About 1975, the FCC announced that all Conditionals would be renewed as Generals. License terms were 5 years then, so by 1980 all Conditionals had been renewed as Generals or had expired.

It should be remembered that back before the Interstate Highway System, travel by car or bus could be slow and expensive. Rail travel was more common then, but trains didn't go everywhere.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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AE5JU
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Posts: 223




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« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2010, 07:08:18 PM »

October 16, 2008.

I'm just glad to be here.

 Grin
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NM7L
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2010, 10:04:06 PM »

Received Novice in mail on 3/17/77 (license was dated 3/14/77).  Original call was WB3GOK

Upgraded to General on 2/28/78, Advanced 4/8/92,  & finally Extra on 4/20/02.

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KB2FCV
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« Reply #35 on: August 12, 2010, 10:42:31 AM »

Got my Novice back in early 1988 when I was in 8th grade.

Within a year and a couple of months I went to Tech - Gen - Advanced and Extra. I had passed my 20wpm code test by just enough so I had my incentive to get my Extra while the CSCE was still good. I still have my first extra license in a frame with a date somewhere in June of 89 when I was 15 years old.

I have most of my CSCE's. My Novice class was administered by my science teacher and another ham at our school when several of us took the test.
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K6LHA
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Posts: 349




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« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2010, 12:18:30 PM »

And do you still have your original licenses/CSCEs from your exam sessions???...I'll start it off....

What say you???

KA3NRX

I can truthfully say that I have NO CSCEs.  I tested for Extra on 25 February 2007 and passed all 3 test elements.  Never had an amateur radio license before.  At the time I was 74.  Got the license grant on 7 March 2007, almost on the 51st anniversary of passing my First Class Radiotelephone (Commercial) license.  I might have been the oldest person in the test session, examiners included.   Cheesy

73, Len K6LHA
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