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Author Topic: "The Andy Griffith Show" and the Eico 720  (Read 6816 times)
N6HPO
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Posts: 39




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« on: August 15, 2010, 03:01:42 PM »

Been watching some early episodes of "The Andy Griffith Show" [mid-1960's] this afternoon on TV Land. The one I'm watching shows an Eico 720 on a bench behind Andy's desk, to his right. The Eico is also in all the episodes I've seen today or ever recall seeing...even as a kid!

There is a smaller rig sitting on top of the Eico.

It sorta looks like an Eico 723; it's in a cabinet, no tubes or transformers exposed, but there are just THREE knobs on Andy's; I can't tell if there is even a meter on it or not! It doesn't look like any of the modulators, vfo's, keyer or power supplly on any of the Eico websites.

Anyone got a clue?

Alan...N6HPO
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KA5N
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2010, 04:01:17 PM »

Eico had the 723 which had a sweep tube as a final AND they had a CB which looked almost the same
(same cabinet).  Of course the CB had tubes in it and put out 4 watts (I don't remember the model number).  This is probably what it is.  I have seen several episodes with it on the table.
Allen
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KA5N
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« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2010, 04:15:28 PM »

Look at Eico 777 at

http://www.retrocom.com/images/99cbpix_6.jpg

Allen
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W8JI
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« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2010, 04:27:45 PM »

Get a copy of Captains Courageous and check out the neat Ham radio in the spoiled brats bedroom!!!!

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W5RKL
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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2010, 05:09:21 AM »

The smaller radio shown sitting on top of the Eico 720 amateur radio transmitter in the Andy Griffith show is an Eico 11 meter transceiver, model "760K".

http://www.rigpix.com/cbfreeband/eico_760.htm

Mike




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N6HPO
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Posts: 39




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« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2010, 05:54:08 PM »

Mike W5RKL gets the cigar.

Thanks all!

Alan
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WA0ZZG
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« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2010, 09:22:08 AM »

You forgot the 'rest of the story'.
Here is what was passed on to me:
They were ready to start shootong, but not all props were delivered yet.  One of the props missing was a police radio.  One of the camera men happened to be a ham and volunteered to bring in a couple of old radios that would look appropiate.  What you see is what that camera man dropped off.
It's not uncommon to shoot a series of episodes at one time.  So, the EICO rigs show up a lot.  The property rental shop replaced them with a Motorola 2-way console.
A CB radio is not out of place in a small town police station of that era. Conventional FM radios were then too expensive for many of them.  My Ohio small town used CB channel 2.  Had a Johnson Messenger on the transmission hump.  We had a sheriff and his helper very much like on he TV show.  The deputy would never lock the patrol car and when he went to dinner, we would sometimes get in the patrol car and steal the crystals out of the CB radio.
Dave......
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KA5N
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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2010, 10:53:13 AM »

Makes me think of the worst science fiction movie of all time (not "Plan Nine From Outer Space" which was light years better) named "Capture That Capsule"  about testing rockets while secret agents from who knows where were trying to capture the "Capsules" when the rockets landed.  While the entire launch command center was controlled by a single S-38C!!!!  (my old S-38 would barely do anything).
Anyway they launched a rocket and capsule and the enemy interferred with the mighty S-38's signal and caused the rocket to crash land at Marine Land of the Pacific's parking lot (naturally closely located
close to the low budget studio making this wonderful movie).  But of course the good guys got there first and protected the telemetry recordings (generated by that one S-38C) contained in the "capsule"
and the earth was saved. 
The Andy Griffith Show looked like the cutting edge of science compared to this scrap of celluloid.

Allen
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KG6YV
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« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2010, 11:26:17 AM »

This reminds me, There was a comedy series during the 1990's called "Wings".  it was about a guy running a private charter service in New England.  In his office he had an old Hallicarfters receiver on the desk under the window overlooking the tarmack.  I can't remember if it was an SX-25 but something from the 40's....

Problem was, the radio had a microphone plugged into the headphone jack.

Hollywood, you gotta love them,

Greg
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N6HPO
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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2010, 07:51:45 PM »

Thanks Dave, Allen and Greg!

I was a kid who was glued to the tv after school and after dinnertime; this was mid-1950 thru mid-1960's so I'm pretty good with East Coast tv shows. That means, New York, New Jersey. We used to get some WFIL Channel 6 [Philadelphia] DX early on summer weekend mornings in Newark, N.J., where I lived. About 6 AM or so. Mostly test patterns...then the ducting would go away.

Anyway, one of my favorite "Father Knows Best" episodes is when son Bud trades his bicycle for a shortwave radio. He sets up the radio and then, that night, they begin to experience a strong thunderstorm. As Bud is tuning around the bands, he hears a "MAY-DAY" call for a boat caught in the storm. The Coast Guard cannot hear the guy, but Bud can through the "skip".

Long story short, Bud and the Anderson family relayed the cruiser's position to the C.G. which helped save the captain and crew of the cabin cruiser, "Betty-Ann". It's a great episode, but I don't see the show on anymore. I guess it, like most things, is available on DVD.

It's stuff like that episode that got me interested in SWL'ing and ham radio.

Best of 73 to you all and thanks for making this such a fun post!

Alan...N6HPO

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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2010, 07:58:34 PM »

There used to be a Business Band allocation just above the 11 meter Citzen's Band.  32 mc? 

Lots of these radios were type accepted for that Business Band - but in reality were simply the Citizen's Band model from a particular company with different crystals and a retune. 

There were also higher power allocations for this band, which is why companies like Browning actually made and sold legal linear amplifiers to match their lineup. 


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W8AAZ
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Posts: 358




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« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2010, 04:35:52 PM »

Was not Andys last ham rig.  It was in  '79 that he had a bizarre show called Salvage 1 in which he had a homemade space ship to salvage junk satellites.  I remember the radio in the instrument panel of that space ship was one of those early Icom 2 meter rigs. One of the large ones with a big knob in the center and something like 24 crystal controlled channels. Mostly was a base station type I think.  Was an expensive radio, and then the cost of 48 crystals......
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K0CBA
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« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2010, 08:07:53 AM »

Don't forget "ALF".    Mr. Tanner had a ham setup in his garage.   I saw some reruns last year on WGN's retro night.  There was a Clegg rig for sure and some other stuff that I do not recall.   
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KG6YV
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Posts: 515




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« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2010, 03:57:01 PM »

OK, now I have one for all you entertainment junkies to see.

Its not a TV show it was a very very famous accademy award winning movie.

Manchurian Candidate......

At the end of the movie when Lawrence Harvey climbs high into the rafters of the convention center with is rifle in a case (to do his pre-programmed assasination). 

He climbs a stairway and goes into a little dog house room near the roof.  It is an equipment room of some sort with a window that views the entire convention center.

Are you holding on to every word yet?

Well, he closes the door once he is inside and puts his rifle case on a little table. 

Behind him up against the wall is some "electronic equipment".













It is a WWII  Army  BC-375 transmitter.  Yup, its the transmitter used by the Army as a field liason communicator as well as the only high power transmitter found in every single solitary B-17 bomber built by Boeing.  I immediately recognized it because I bought one 15 years ago at a ham club auction for estates in the Central valley of CA.  It stands about 30 inches high with 4 VT-211 tubes, two for the final (push pull) and two for the modulator.  The final tuning was implemented with plug in modules for select tuning ranges from at least 2 mc to around 15 mc. as I remember. 
The one I bought was originally purchased war surplus and packed away.  I got the transmitter and 6 or so tuning units.  The tuning units were still packed in the original shipping paper with cosmoline coating on the modules.  The boxes were un-opened. 

For those who remember Ziebart auto rustproofing or Rusty Jone, cosmoline was an anti-rust/anti fungal coating manufacturers used on radio gear during the war to prevent corrosion during shipment.  It washes off with kerosene.

FYi,

Greg
KG6YV
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