Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: CB repeaters  (Read 15689 times)
AC6IJ
Member

Posts: 66




Ignore
« on: August 20, 2010, 06:25:09 PM »

I have heard Hams talking about CBers using CB repeaters, is there anything to this or just silly talk?? Bill
Logged
KG4RUL
Member

Posts: 3040


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2010, 06:31:32 PM »

CB repeaters are not legal.
Logged
AH6RR
Member

Posts: 846




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2010, 07:02:19 PM »

Neither is talking above 27.405 but when has that stopped them??
Logged
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2010, 08:25:01 PM »

You'd have to ask those hams.

Since novice ops are dumped onto VHF, they might be complaining about new hams conducting them selves like they did on CB via a VHF repeater?

For me, I never worry about what CBers do unless they wind up on a ham band.

Since I don't listen to any repeaters, I don't worry about people who do use them.

73
Bob
Logged
WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2010, 08:33:13 PM »

I would "assume" (and we all know what happens when you do that) they're referring to using a simplex repeater. These are simple store-and-forward devices. Because CB users have no right to privacy and it's perfectly legal to record their transmissions, it would be legal to use a simplex repeater controller to record their transmission. Also, because there is no rule concerning a control operator being at the location of a transmitter, that an unmanned transmitter would not be illegal. Combining the two bits of reasoning, I can see where a simplex repeater would be legal to use on CB frequencies on a non-interference basis. This is based on my own logic, and of course, I have no legal basis for my opinion. The rules were written before such devices came into being. -WY3X
Logged
N2CJ
Member

Posts: 263


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2010, 10:42:06 PM »

There are a number of FRS/GMRS repeater setups here in the NYC metro area and I believe they are legal. That may be what they were referring to.
Logged
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3188




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2010, 12:17:57 AM »

I seriously doubt the average CB'er would take the time nor would it be advantageous to go thought all the trouble required including the idea of spending all the money that would be required to set up a repeater on that band.

It would be much easier for them to just get a ham license and operate VHF.

Quite frankly, even if they did, a repeater on CB would suck and it wouldn't function very well at all. It would be like putting a repeater on HF bands. It's a completely useless endeavor.


Logged
KJ4MYY
Member

Posts: 34




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2010, 05:22:45 AM »

I guess it would be as good as a 10M repeater.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 16763




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2010, 06:44:59 AM »

When I was in Australia (some years ago now) there were a few CB repeaters in operation.  The rules said that
CB radios couldn't transmit and receive on different frequencies on a single channel setting, so the repeaters
were set up to receive on, say, channel 1 and transmit on channel 40.  That gave maximum channel separation
but only required one click of the channel switch (presuming it didn't have a stop) to switch between them.
So everyone would listen on channel 40 then switch to channel 1 to transmit.  That would still require good
isolation between transmit and receive, so it wasn't something that the average CBer would set up, and there
were a limited number of channel combinations that were practical.

I have no idea whether such repeaters would be legal under the US rules, or even if they were legal under the
Australian rules at the time, but they could be used with unmodified CB radios.  I suspect that the simplex
repeaters are more common, but having tried one in another service they can be rather awkward to use.
Logged
GW0DIV
Member

Posts: 122




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2010, 11:39:05 AM »

There was a YouTube video of 11M repeaters in the Caribbean area a while back. CB'ers in the UK are messing around with internet linking on 27MHz and PMR 446, OFCOM seem to be condoning UHF linking and turning a blind eye to 11M linking. Seems like they are getting usefull info from it?!

Rhys
GW0DIV
Logged
KF5AHV
Member

Posts: 56




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2010, 05:06:11 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pWB17LzsHk

Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4941




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2010, 03:07:26 PM »

Never heard of one. But I did hear a VK station repeating thru the Virgin Islands on 20M USB !

Beat that !
Logged
WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 6466




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2010, 07:47:46 AM »

The FCC's Class D Citizens Band (what most refer to ) does not have repeaters here in the US.  Other classes, such as Class A, do.  Other countries may have sevices that use the same frequencies and use repeaters... I do not know, and there is a lot of illegal activities, also.
Now we do have amateur 10 meter FM repeaters allowed above 29 Mhz.  I doubt that is what is being discussed, though.  You are probably hearing about the GMRS service here.
73s.

-Mike.
Logged
KA2DEW
Member

Posts: 5




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2017, 10:59:58 AM »

So what you do is have a high school friend (Fred) who lives on a hill in NY suburbs in NJ.  Take an old Radio Shack 23 channel walkie talkie with broken antenna but with good squelch control (not asking much here).  Walkie talkie is placed in milk-crate covered by plastic bag open to the bottom for ventilation and let any water get out.  Hook HT up to a 5/8 wave radio shack ground-plane on a 20' mast at one end of the property (out behind the garage/barn building) but free-standing and guyed to big stakes.  Set walkie's 24 position switch to channel 23.  Take the walkie talkie's earphone output, run it down a 200' long piece of RG58 coax that has water damage so it was free, and then through a cap and resistor hook it to the mike input of a SSB CB set on channel 3 LSB in the house.  Walkie is powered from coax shield and both conductors of a 200' long run of extension cord zip-wire hooked up to the power supply in the house.  Hardwire the PTT to ON on the SSB radio.   Let it rip.   SSB CB transmits into StarDuster 1/4 wave vertical.  Receiving stations must tune to the repeater, AM input makes tuning unnecessary. 

User stations come into the walkie on channel 23 AM, and stations must listen to the output on 3 lower side band.  They can listen on short-wave receiver or using CB.  Clearly odd split so using separate radios is a good idea.  Halicrafters S108 and Allied AX-190 are fair receivers.  Nice thing about using SSB TX is there is no COR/PTT requirement since SSB radio doesn't put out (much) power until squelch opens on the walkie. 

I'd never do this of course.  It would not be legal.  And Fred wouldn't have let me put it at his house on the hill.  But it would work for a good 10 miles or so and would be completely silly, which actually would have been a good quality in the mid 70s, especially since I'd have been about 16 or 17 and believing myself completely lacking in decorum (though I would be wrong) right about when 40 channel CBs were coming out and, making the 23 channel radios practically free.   

Logged
K4JJL
Member

Posts: 778




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2017, 11:26:09 AM »

Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!