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Author Topic: writing versus typing at 30 wpm.....strange result  (Read 4259 times)
W0XI
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« on: September 04, 2010, 02:45:44 PM »

Hi Guys,

I've been using the JustLearnMorseCode program to bring forth (back) my CW from years ago (maybe I'm dreaming; maybe I never did "have it." Hi).

Anyway, I'm pushing up at about 80 words (after ten days) out of the 100 most common (N0HFF list) at word speed of 30 wpm and overall speed at 26 wpm. I was doing my daily 1/2-hour today and noticed an interesting - if not weird/strange - thing. I can copy solid by writing in cursive but cannot keep up with typing it. I noticed if I wait until the word is complete and then type it I seem to do 80% or so.

Strange. I guess I must have learned to type whole words (in memory - by look and see and/or look and type) rather than a few letters at a time as the word is forming. Hm. Weird. 73s. Phil. W0XI
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KE3WD
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2010, 04:00:45 PM »

Practicing with random single characters and the qwerty keyboard should clear that up, if you are interested in doing so. 
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WX7G
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2010, 04:35:06 PM »

Closing your eyes while copying can help.
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W0XI
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« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2010, 09:04:52 AM »

Closing your eyes while copying can help.

TNX. What is your theory behind that? Just curious. I think I'd have to be listening quietly - and my mind seems to wander - perhaps too many cells left and need more vodka! 73s, Phil, W0XI. 

PS: Just read a funny quote. An ole guy was asked what he does now that he's ole and tired. He said, "I was a chem-engineer early and life; now I have a hobby of converting gin, wine, and vodka to urine." Ha. 73s.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2010, 02:24:04 PM »

I can't write very fast at all, since I rarely write anything.

I can type quite fast (120-130 wpm) though, and I don't have to look at the keys, or the screen, or really anything, to type properly: A result of learning to touch-type at a very early age (about 12) using keyboards with no markings, in a class taught by a great teacher.

I've found I can type code as fast as I can copy it, which is very fast.  Typing it doesn't really slow down the process at all; however I have no reason to do this other than as an experiment!  Experimentally, I have found I type each word after I copy it, and not "letter by letter."  So, in typing, I'm always about one word behind real time.

I figure there's no cash prize for handing in a perfectly typed copy of whatever code I was listening to, so why bother?
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WX7G
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2010, 03:45:27 PM »

W0XI, just an observation. I can copy more accurately if I don't see the word forming on the page. But if I'm copying in my head I can copy better with my eyes open. I copy CW while driving to and from work and it helps to do this with my eyes open.

I too am working on my CW skills. I spend some time each day copying in my head a novel sent by CW. It's faster than I can completely follow and it's pushing my speed up. I also practice everyday with RufZ, Morse Runner, and five character code groups using Just Learn Morse Code. I'm seeing slow but steady progress.

And I have trouble too with my mind wandering while copying CW. To try to get around that while copying in my head I make sure I concentrate on the beginning of each word. That seems to keep me more focused.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2010, 03:47:19 PM by DAVE CUTHBERT » Logged
WB2WIK
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2010, 07:19:40 PM »


And I have trouble too with my mind wandering while copying CW. To try to get around that while copying in my head I make sure I concentrate on the beginning of each word. That seems to keep me more focused.

IMO, that means you're not copying fast enough.  I find my mind wanders a lot at slower speeds, but that doesn't happen much at 40-50 wpm.
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W0XI
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2010, 07:58:52 AM »

...I too am working on my CW skills. I spend some time each day copying in my head a novel sent by CW. It's faster than I can completely follow and it's pushing my speed up. I also practice everyday with RufZ, Morse Runner, and five character code groups using Just Learn Morse Code. I'm seeing slow but steady progress. ...

WX7J & WB2WIK, tnx. Yes, I too am seeking steady progress. I'm keeping a log in a bound sketchbook. I'm using RufZxp for callsigns and Just Learn Morse Code too. I'll check out Morse Runner and have others too. What have you all found in the way of simulated QSO programs for download? Oh...I've also made some tapes using ebook2cw; it converts text to mp3 & wav files.

To stay motivated, I'm studying articles about code and related linguistics found on the web primarily. My nature is to design rather than operate, so adding those keeps me going. I've had my hearing tested - primarily for safety reasons because I've been working with ultrasound equipment experiments - and happy to report that my hearing is "aging" normally. SSB audio range is fine, higher sounds starting to go down a bit.

Regarding typing/writing previous word completed while listening to next, guessing that is key. I tried that yesterday and works up to my poor typing ability. You may find discussions on "short term memory" (google that or go to wiki) interesting. There is a linguistic concept called "chunking," wherein it is found that clumping bits of info together promotes/increases short term memory (with practice, effort). For example, grouping a phone number into 913-111-2222 is easier to copy and remember/process for a short time than not grouping.
This implies - which I will try - that grouping call signs XXNYYY into XX N YYY should assist in better call sign copy, and so forth. Fun stuff. 73s. Phil, W0XI in Kansas. 
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KE3WD
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2010, 08:28:42 AM »

Every problem on this thread can be solved with practice and time at the practice. 

Important part of 'practice' is to make sure that you are not spending too much time at it per day and that you are always HAVING FUN with it. 

Short sessions, repeated, are usually the way to get there faster rather than long dreary ones. 

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WX7G
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2010, 10:35:04 AM »

W0XI I agree with chunking. I work CW while mobile and I can remember a call better if, for example, WB6HHQ is remembered as the prefix WB6 with the suffix HHQ.
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W0XI
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2010, 12:16:34 PM »

Every problem on this thread can be solved with practice and time at the practice. ...

Hi WD! Of course! And, I assume, that you mean practice WITH a good plan based on fundamentals about the subject at hand, not just blind practice.

And that's a part of what this thread/discussion is about, exploring the process too! I find it interesting, a part of my hobby time. Furthermore, investigation of the code and phonetic processes is fun in and of itself. 73s. Phil, W0XI
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