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Author Topic: 1000+ Miles on 1 Watt  (Read 27319 times)
K5BEZ
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #45 on: February 05, 2013, 01:41:43 PM »

Congrats!
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WA2TPU
Member

Posts: 210




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« Reply #46 on: February 05, 2013, 06:52:19 PM »

To All who posted.....

What GREAT STUFF!! Congrats to ALL of you!! Isn't being a Qrper just a TON OF FUN!!?? I think so and obviously so do all of you who posted. Thanks for sharing your wonderful and memorable experiences. May the DX and Propagation Gods smile upon ALL of us in 2013.

Best regards and many 72/73.
Don sr. --WA2TPU --
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W1VT
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Posts: 846




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« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2013, 05:27:11 AM »

I've been able to work and confirm via paper QSL, WAS and WAC, as well as 50 countries 2 way QRP.

Last year I put up a 20 ft Flagpole vertical and was able to work two Japanese stations on JT65 running 5 watts!  It  is actually easier to work them on CW, but I wanted to see if I could do it. They aren't as far away as the VKs I worked, but they have more interference on their end, making it a tougher contact to make.  Grin

Zack W1VT
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 05:29:26 AM by W1VT » Logged
GILGSN
Member

Posts: 207




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« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2013, 01:36:56 PM »

Yesterday I was chatting with a friend 830 miles away on 20m CW. We both had a good signal so he asked me to turn down power to 500mW. I set it to 100mW. No problem! That's more than 8000 miles per Watt! I was using my KX3 and a PAR End-Fed. We regularly try down to 1W or 500mW and 100mW was a good surprise. 1W is a good QRP power. Works almost every time.. I've never crossed the Atlantic with it, but 600 to 1300 miles is no problem.

QRP doesn't work? Yeah, right!

Gil.
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W1VT
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Posts: 846




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« Reply #49 on: February 08, 2013, 03:54:55 PM »

I just exchanged QSLs with MI6GTY, who runs 5 watts from his 817 to a wire antenna.  I was running 100 watts to an 80M wire vertical in a tree--so I've worked a QRP station across the pond on 80.  Grin
I've been running 100W to work 5BDXCC--takes so long to work DX on 80M QRP that it wouldn't be any fun...
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 04:06:03 PM by W1VT » Logged
G7DIE
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #50 on: February 27, 2013, 06:37:51 AM »

My best 80m QRP contact was with a 7' antenna on the roof of my car, 10W SSB from NW England to Prince Edward Island, I wish I'd tried less power because I made it though the myriad of people calling  Smiley
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K3CXG
Member

Posts: 27




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« Reply #51 on: February 28, 2013, 01:39:44 PM »

Today, I worked Kiev, Ukraine from my car in the Washington, DC area with my FT-817 and hamstick clone on 17 meters - a very positive experience!  QRPers, if you're having a ball with the hobby, then pay no heed to the trolls, nay-sayers and haters.  Just enjoy!
73 de K3CXG/qrp
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N2MVV
Member

Posts: 16




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« Reply #52 on: March 13, 2013, 01:42:19 PM »

Just got a great DX SSB contact from New York City to Croatia (9A3KS) on 15 meters, 21.292 @ 2.5 watts (4207 miles)

Band is open and I received a 57 report on my Yaesu FT-817ND with Buddistick portable antenna.

You don't need the big towers and amplifiers.

Eric (N2MVV)
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NU4B
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Posts: 2304




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« Reply #53 on: March 14, 2013, 03:33:40 AM »

--takes so long to work DX on 80M QRP that it wouldn't be any fun...

You were joking.... weren't you?
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MI6OTW
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #54 on: March 14, 2013, 01:54:11 PM »

Recently I've worked v44kao on 17m, k2tqc and N0bui on 20m,all with 5watts from my ft817 and dipoles in the roof space. Its amazing where 5 watts will get you.
73 de paul .
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W1VT
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Posts: 846




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« Reply #55 on: March 16, 2013, 03:00:54 AM »

--takes so long to work DX on 80M QRP that it wouldn't be any fun...

You were joking.... weren't you?

No, part of keeping ham radio fun is balance.  You know, turning the radio when you have other obligations?

I'd often hear a juicy band opening and have to turn off the radio before working anything.  Not fun at all.

For me, the most practical solution was to buy a 100 watt radio--the first one I've owned in 34 years as a ham, replacing a long line of QRP radios.

I had blast this winter, not only finishing up my 40M DXCC, but actually working 105 countries on 80M  in just 7 weeks, and boosting my QSL total from under 20 to 100 in just 10 weeks.  Yes--I now have 5B-DXCC!

Many thanks to W9DX who went above and beyond to confirm my 80M QSO with K5LZO/KP5 way back in 1985--I was running just 0.65 watts, or 2400 miles per watt!

Zack W1VT






« Last Edit: March 16, 2013, 03:05:54 AM by W1VT » Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1777




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« Reply #56 on: March 16, 2013, 03:46:22 AM »

Re: W1VT   " takes so long to work DX on 80M QRP that it wouldn't be any fun"

Please consider this: One ham's fun might be another ham's drudgery.
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 260




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« Reply #57 on: March 16, 2013, 12:50:13 PM »

'...takes so long to work DX ... in QRP...'

Hmmmm, so just to confirm this: you're suggesting that as you increase transmitter power, the signal travels faster, thus requiring less time to travel to the distant station?  I seem to achieve the same result with low powered transmitters, but I do cheat by pressing down on the Morse key VERY HARD to increase my antenna pressure, causing RF to radiate just as rapidly as from a high powered station. Of course, there is a down side: my arm gets tired and I can damage a key by bursting one of the RF 'o-ring' seals and RF sprays all over the room, if I am not careful. I received a nasty burn on my knuckle that way & more than once too!   Shocked

(Is it April fools day yet?)


>73 de Ray
W7ASA
 
« Last Edit: March 16, 2013, 01:31:38 PM by W7ASA » Logged
NU4B
Member

Posts: 2304




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« Reply #58 on: March 16, 2013, 01:33:13 PM »

--takes so long to work DX on 80M QRP that it wouldn't be any fun...

You were joking.... weren't you?

No, part of keeping ham radio fun is balance.  You know, turning the radio when you have other obligations?

I'd often hear a juicy band opening and have to turn off the radio before working anything.  Not fun at all.

For me, the most practical solution was to buy a 100 watt radio--the first one I've owned in 34 years as a ham, replacing a long line of QRP radios.

I had blast this winter, not only finishing up my 40M DXCC, but actually working 105 countries on 80M  in just 7 weeks, and boosting my QSL total from under 20 to 100 in just 10 weeks.  Yes--I now have 5B-DXCC!

Many thanks to W9DX who went above and beyond to confirm my 80M QSO with K5LZO/KP5 way back in 1985--I was running just 0.65 watts, or 2400 miles per watt!

Zack W1VT








Zach,
 I remember working you several times back in your QRP days. Remember the 80"s?  Grin

 It took me a long time to work 80M DXCC - about 25 years. But the problem was the antenna I was using. I had a HF2V. It a good antenna but its a rough go with 5 watts on 80. When I got the windom the world opened up on 80 and I was able to knock it out fairly quickly.

 I do understand where your coming from, you got to work with what you got. For along time the place I lived would only support a vertical and there was no room for a lengthy antenna. So the vertical was sort of a compromise on 80. It got me on the band but that was about it. My "reach" was to the western part of western EU, western west Africa, to the eastern part of the Pacific. On 40 and 30 the antenna performed a lot better - no surprise. At that point 5B DXCC was really never in the cards unless I went with more power.

 When I moved I bought the windom really to just get the vertical out of the yard. I was pleasantly shocked when I started to work some good stuff on 80. Then I started concentrating on 80 since that was the last band left to work 100 countries. (excluding 160  Grin). So during the winter I would get up past midnight and work what I could. I hit the big DX contests and then during the week I found much less competition as most people were asleep after midnight. (Obviously I didn't get up every night, but a night or 2 a week during the winter. If there was nothing new there I quickly got back in bed.  Grin)
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W1VT
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Posts: 846




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« Reply #59 on: March 16, 2013, 03:35:50 PM »

QRP 5B-DXCC is quite the achievement!

While Larry NU4B and Randy AA2U have done it, I'm not certain it is still achievable--unless you are willing to put up a serious antenna--like a four-square or vertical array of four 80M verticals.

The changes I see are more low band interference, spotting via the Internet, and more emphasis on working a DX station on every single band and mode.  And, I almost forgot, the Leader Board, so the big guns need to work you on every single band and mode you have available on your DX-pedition!

In the good old days, one could work some really rare DX-peditions rather easily once the pileups disappeared.  Nowadays, with many stations trying to work a DX-pedition 27 times, those times are becoming much harder to find. 9 bands x 3 modes = 27 QSOs.

Maybe it is just me, but it took a really long time to work 2 way QRP WAC--two of those contacts were 5000+ miles.  It also took a long time to work 1000 QRP ARCI members, all 2-way QRP CW.

Zack W1VT
« Last Edit: March 16, 2013, 03:57:45 PM by W1VT » Logged
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