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Author Topic: 6 meter expectations  (Read 20384 times)
N7BAV
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2010, 01:40:54 PM »

Jason-  I also live in Oregon and know the challenges of 6 meters from the Northwest. Living in the Columbia River Gorge my antenna looks into mountains in three compass directions.  In a 4 year period (and no I am not retired) I have confirmed 49 states (still need Hawaii) on 6 meters running an Icom Pro 3 barefoot with a 3 element beam.  You have to be listening to 6 meters during the "E" seasons, the primary season just ended and generally runs May through August.  The ARRL has two VHF contests which are good times to turn on the rig and listen to 6 meters. In the NW if you don't have a rotator or tower just point a 3 element beam toward the east on a mast on the roof and you will be surprised what you can do during "E"s.  The fantastic Fathers Day opening this year even dropped some European stations into the NW and I was able to work four countries on CW during that opening.  On the tougher stuff like Alaska, Hawaii and foreign DX it really helps to know CW but for lower 48 stuff SSB will work fine. If you are not near your rig one of the best tools you have is the DX Sherlock website so you can check their maps periodically during "E"s to see when openings are occurring. The map will be pretty blank on 6 meters until the winter openings.  The NW is not the eastern seaboard and you are not going to work much European DX on 6 meters.  However, 6 meters can be a lot of fun and you will find me there when it is open. If not you might catch me on 80 meter CW some night. Good luck on 6 meters and do catch those VHF contests, you will rack up states in a hurry with a modest antenna.

Ed  N7BAV
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RAINS
Member

Posts: 20




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« Reply #16 on: August 27, 2010, 10:18:06 PM »

I live 30 miles south east of Eugene in the mountains. I am closed in on 3 sides myself. Luckily I am near quite a few repeaters. I never thought i could get out on 2m simplex ever.  However I recently got a 7.8dbi 2-meter vertical now I can get over a 3k ft ridge from my location in the bottom of a valley. With a good antenna you will be very surprised at what your signal will do! With your high winds I think you should try a 4element 2m/70cm yagi beam antenna. You might be able to bounce some RF into a repeater from your house. You will need to play around with direction and Azimuth quite  a bit to get things right. Don't give up on 2m I bet you can get out with a good antenna. Keep us all posted!


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KD8NGE
Member

Posts: 37




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« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2010, 06:35:45 AM »

I'm not the brightest bulb in the chandelier, so this is offered only as an idea.
NVIS?
More wind resistance, simple construction, should saturate the distance you mention.
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 14385




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« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2010, 06:48:58 AM »

NVIS on 6M? An NVIS signal would punch right through the ionosphere. Good for communications with other worlds, but not family and friends hear on Earth Roll Eyes
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
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