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Author Topic: Router Slows Data Rate  (Read 541 times)
K3AN
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Posts: 787




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« on: April 17, 2009, 02:10:57 PM »

With our new 3MBPS cable modem service, there is a profound difference in how quickly a large web page downloads and displays on the computer when the cable modem is connected directly vs. when the modem feeds a router which feeds the computer (via ethernet).

With the direct connection, the data send and receive LEDs on the cable modem are on almost constantly until the page is displayed. With the router in the connection, there will be a burst of data, then nothing for 2 to maybe 15 seconds, then another burst of data, etc. A page that loads in a few seconds with the direct connection can take over a minute with the router connection. The LED color on the router indicates it's talking at 100 MBPS, not 10 MBPS.

Bad router? A flow control option not set properly? Any suggestions are welcome.
 
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KB3LSR
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2009, 02:31:03 PM »

(1) Even if you were at 10mbs on your LAN, it wouldn't be the bottleneck because your internet connection itself is 3mbs, so anything above 3mbs won't be a bottleneck.  I used find it funny how one large chain (now defunct) used sell 54mbs WiFi routers and claim they will make your internet faster.

(2) You might want to try reseting your routing table.  Routers these days use switches (instead of hubs).  A switch "memorizes" which computers are connected to which ports, so the packets go through quicker.  The problem is that if you switch port numbers, the routing table can get "confused."  The reset button is usually in the back and they usually need a paperclip to press the button down.  Once the router/switch is reset, then plug in your modem, then plug in your computer's ethernet cable.  That should have fixed it.

(3) If that doesn't work, I would try replacing the router/switch.  I've had routers/switches/hubs go bad on occasion (yes it's pretty rare, but I have seen it).  
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KB3LSR
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2009, 02:33:28 PM »

I forgot to mention, if you have a WiFi router, and it's not secured (by default, they are unsecure), someone could be hijacking your WiFi signal and be downloading large files with it.  That will slow any internet connection down.  If you do have a WiFi router and need help securing it, send me an e-mail.

73 de AB3HJ
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12980




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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2009, 05:18:20 PM »

If its a wireless router, even if its secure it could be set on a very busy channel which could slow things down. I typically change the default channel because most of the neighbors use the default channel.

There could also be other router settings that are slowing things down. I had an issue here where the router had to be cloned to the same MAC address as the computer that was initially used to set up the modem service. It was a real mess until I got hold of a cooperative service guy because the standard answer was "we don't support routers on our cable service". Since that company is now out of business I expect things may have changed by now.
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K3AN
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Posts: 787




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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 07:39:13 PM »

I will try the hard reset on the router. Although it is a Wi-Fi router, the slow pass-through exists even on an Ethernet port. But I do experience the same delay problem with my laptop that's connected via Wi-Fi. Nobody in this neighborhood of retirees is likely to know how to spoof a MAC address, which I use to limit Wi-Fi device access. And the cable modem's send and receive LEDs aren't showing unexpected bursts of activity when I'm not actively surfing.

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AA6YQ
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2009, 12:05:58 AM »

Early routers are just slow. I'd been using a Linksys BEFSR-41 with my cable modem since the Roadrunner days. A visiting Comcast tech disconnected my cable modem from the BEFSR-41 and connected it directly to my development PC. Download speed as measured by

http://www.speakeasy.net/speedtest/

went from ~7 mb/sec to ~30 mb/sec! I replaced the BEFSR-41 with a Netgear FVS336G (thinking I may someday decide to use FIOS as a backup WAN) and now see ~30 mb/sec downloads from any PC on the LAN.

    73,

        Dave, AA6YQ
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K3AN
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Posts: 787




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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2009, 07:42:29 AM »

The hard reset of the router did the trick. Once again there is no noticeable difference in the time it takes to display my favorite web pages.

Thanks to all who commented.

K3AN
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KJ4CJV
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2009, 10:41:04 AM »

Just get http://dd-wrt.com/ install that firmware for your router and be done with it! I use it on all my routers never failed for me!
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KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3734




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« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2009, 04:14:23 PM »

hi,

visit the website for the brand of router
you own and I bet there is a firmware update
available.

it is not necessary to have the latest and
greatest but if you are within one or two releases
you should be good to go.

many use third party firmware to program the
router, be careful and have a backup copy of your
settings available if needed.

also good idea to have a backup copy if your
router fails, very easy to restore to a new one.

73 james
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KA9CQL
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2009, 01:30:51 AM »

There is a good chance that the explanation for your 3-to-15 second delay is that your router's IP address does not have a reverse-DNS-lookup record, and your computer is trying to figure out what it is.

If I am correct, you have DHCP turned on in your router, and the router is acting as a "DNS relay" to your cable modem (or DSL) provider's DNS server(s).

Couple things you can try - add an entry for your router's IP address to your computer's "hosts" file.  On Microsoft Windows this file is usually found in the C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\Etc directory. If you don't already have a "hosts" file in this directory, you might find a "hosts.sam" file there.  You can just copy that over to "hosts", with NO EXTENSION (aka no ".txt" or other suffix on the end of the filename).  On Linux the file is /etc/hosts.  Add an entry for the IP of your router as such -

127.0.0.1      localhost
192.168.2.1    myrouter   # This is the IP address of your router

Depending upon your operating system, adding this entry can speed up the reverse-DNS resolution that may be causing your extra delays.

An alternative explanation for the delays you're seeing may be that your "primary DNS server" is down, and your system is still trying to use it first, only to fall back to your "secondary DNS server" after a short delay.

Most competent Internet providers have more than one DNS server available for your use.  They usually set them up in their DHCP server configuration so that your computer picks them up automatically when it first starts up.  If you use Microsoft Windows, from the command line, type "ipconfig/all" and look for "DNS Servers".  If there's more than one, try reversing their order, and see what happens.

If you use Linux, check out your DNS configuration (typically setup in /etc/resolv.conf), and see if you have more than one DNS Server.  Try switching them if you do, as advised above.  DNS under Linux is a bit more tricky to configure if you're new to it, so take care.

------------
Don't forget - as most websites have advertising, images and content served from a multitude of hosts, your computer may be performing DNS lookups for TONS of systems even though you may only be trying to view one webpage.  Making the change mentioned above might help your situation.

Let us know what happens!

Good Luck!

- Mike S.
  KA9CQL
  Victorville, CA, USA
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