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Author Topic: Boatanchor for WARC and 60 meters  (Read 4069 times)
AA5WG
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Posts: 493




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« on: September 26, 2010, 11:28:17 AM »

Hi to all:
Is there a boatanchor that would serve well for the WARC bands and 60 meters?
Thank you.
Chuck - AA5WG
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G4FUT
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Posts: 88




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« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2010, 03:34:17 PM »

WARC is easy enough as the later Kenwood Hybrids have those bands, but they cannot be adapted for 5Mhz as the frequencies they use have tuned circuits for each band.
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AA5WG
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« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2010, 06:24:38 AM »

G4FUT:
Thank you.
Chuck
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1377




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« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2010, 04:28:02 PM »

You could go with a piece of commercial or military gear that is continuous coverage. It is not a tube based radio but I run several Harris RF-350K radios that cover from 1.6 - 30 MHz at 100 watts, LSB/USB/CW. There are more boat-anchor-y types of commercial gear (Maritime) that also has continuous coverage.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
N2EY
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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2010, 07:09:25 PM »

Depends on what you call a boatanchor.

As others have noted, the Kenwood TS-830S and 530S have those bands, and are hybrids. Good rigs too, though the tuning rate is a bit fast for my taste.

The big problem is that those bands weren't allocated to hams until 1979, when the BA era was ending or already over, depending on your definition.

If you want something with more iron, the Johnson Viking II CD version had continuous HF coverage - all you need are the right crystals or VFO. Of course it's just a transmitter and does not do SSB, so it won't be any good on 60 meters.

The matching 122 VFO has a range meant for 11 meters that could be modified to cover one of the WARC bands. Padding it down to 5 MHz could put you on 30 meters.


There are many hollow-state general-coverage receivers that would match up well with the Viking 2.

---

Which raises that old question: Just what qualifies as a boatanchor?

73 de Jim, N2EY

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AA5WG
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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2010, 05:58:05 PM »

AA4HA and N2EY:
Thank you.
Chuck - AA5WG
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KG5UN
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2010, 06:24:13 PM »

I have always gone for the old Drake Twins as they can be crystaled for any band.
Ed
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W3LK
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2010, 08:31:26 AM »

I have always gone for the old Drake Twins as they can be crystaled for any band.
Ed


Ditto the Collins S-Line, including the KWM-2 and 2A.
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KG6YV
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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2010, 01:07:57 PM »

60 meters is "channelized" with an FCC requirement for precise resolution and stability of the transmitted frequency that would be impossible with most boat anchor ham radio equipment...

Greg
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W3LK
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2010, 04:27:07 PM »

60 meters is "channelized" with an FCC requirement for precise resolution and stability of the transmitted frequency that would be impossible with most boat anchor ham radio equipment...

Greg


That is very true, but does not apply to the other half of the question, the WARC bands.
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W5RKL
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« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2010, 05:02:07 AM »

I have always gone for the old Drake Twins as they can be crystaled for any band.
Ed


Not necessarily true.

The one WARC limitation is 60 meters. The Drake T4<any> transmitter cannot be used on 60 meter due to the 5.645Mhz Carrier Oscillator and the Drake R4<any> receiver due to the 5.645Mhz IF. This discussed in the Drake T4/R4<any> manuals.

The Drake twins can operate on the other WARC bands by obtaining the HET OSC xtals for that frequency range.

There are other issue to consider when thinking of operating other boat anchor transmitters and receivers on the WARC bands. It's not a simple matter of plugging in a new het osc crystal and tuning up on one of the WARC bands. Mixer output frequencies and tank circuits resonating on the WARC bands must be taken into consideration. Mixer rejection of unwanted/undesired signals is also an important issue to prevent transmission of signals outside of the ham bands. While there are some vintage gear, such as Collins and Drake for example, that will operate properly on the WARC bands, there are many others that will not.

73s
Mike

« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 05:04:43 AM by Michael Waldrop » Logged
W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2010, 03:11:03 PM »


The one WARC limitation is 60 meters. ... The Drake twins can operate on the other WARC bands by obtaining the HET OSC xtals for that frequency range.
Mike

60m is not a WARC band. It is an allocation to the FCC for amateur use, on a secondary basis, by the NTIA, the frequency coordination agency for Federal users.
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