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Author Topic: SMART CHARGER fro AUX AGM Battery in Mobile??  (Read 6463 times)
VK4SX
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« on: October 15, 2010, 02:14:05 PM »

Hi fellas, I would be interested in any comments in regards mobile RV users or anyone running a AUX AGM type battery in their vehicle, the main point of interest to me is the Manufacture name of the BATTERY to BATTERY SMART CHARGER in use, and the amount of RFI generated by the gadget, Brands tested, solutions tried etc etc .
I run a TS-480 and a HI-Q 4/80 MC-1 recently installed in a FORD RANGER 2.5 Ltr Diesel Style side, with a POWERSONIC 111Ah AGM in the tub, I need to use a DC to DC Smart charger to maintain the AGM properties eg; 14.4v charge and float @ 13.6>8 .

I would be very much interested in any info , ideas, in regards this situation.

Rgds
Dennis VK4SX.
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2010, 06:52:04 AM »

Why.

The Optima design AGM is one of the best. I suggest you read the data on their web site about charging.

http://optimabatteries.com/product_support/charging.php
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K3GM
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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2010, 11:50:37 AM »

I run an Optima Yellow Top aux. battery in my 2007 Tahoe specifically for my radio gear.  The battery is isolated from the starting battery and the vehicle's electrical system.  I use a HellRoaring BIC-75150A Battery Isolator to separate the two systems, but charge the Yellow Top, .  This particular device has practically no forward voltage drop.  Both have provided excellent service for nearly 2 years, and I don't detect any noise from the device.

Note: My Tahoe is a weekend vehicle only.  I wanted to float charge the entire system with a small charger, but was advised by the manufacturer's instructions of this particular charger to not float charge AGM batteries.  So check the charger first.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 11:54:45 AM by Tom Hybiske » Logged
VK4SX
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Posts: 36




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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2010, 01:42:56 PM »

Why.

The Optima design AGM is one of the best. I suggest you read the data on their web site about charging.

http://optimabatteries.com/product_support/charging.php

Thanks for reply, charging the AGM style battery isn't the issue,  finding a suitable Mimimum RFI radiating DC to DC charger is the task at hand.  there are plenty of 3 STAGE/ 6 Stage Smart chargers designed for AGM batteries, but locating a LOW emmision unit to suit Hf Ham mobile is a problem.

three of the commerical Smart chargers, ( DC-DC)  I have used are terrible, make HF use while it is active , absolutely hopeless,  60 over S9 screeching every 40Khz is hard to suppress.

I have just received an email,  a large manufacturer of Chargers has re hashed/revised their latest product at the manufacture stage to overcome this. this product is available world wide, a VK ham will test it, so I will post any news in regards this.
needed to ask the question here, as you guys get first dibs on good gear, and surely someone must have experienced a DC- DC mobile charging unit, and it's affects on HF HAM freqs.


Thank you for your replies.

Rgds
Dennis vk4sx

ps , I referred to Powersonic USA charging recommendations for longivity of the product
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K0BG
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2010, 02:04:04 PM »

Dennis, you really don't need a fancy switching charger for any lead acid battery, AGM or otherwise. That's why I suggested you read the Optima info.

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KC2MMI
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2010, 07:21:00 PM »

Dennis-
 If you are planning to deep cycle the second battery and want to recharge it quickly, I can understand why you'd want a separate charging system for it. But since that charging system still has to rely on the one alternator, which has one internal regulator, you're stuck. Your alternator can only be controlled by one regulator and one voltage sense lead. And it won't properly charge two different batteries (one deeply discharged deep cycle plus one lightly used SLI) at the same time.
 So unless you want to look at special cases like a dual-output Balmar alternator with two separate regulators, or a second alternator for your second battery, the best solution is the HellRoaring (solid state) or the Yandina (relay) battery isolator. Yandina is also sold by West Marine under their own name and it is very simple, robust, and effective.
 With either one of those isolators, when the car starts up and the SLI battery is brought up to 13.6-13.8 volts, the isolator closes (relay or power transistor) and connects the second battery in parallel with the first. The alternator's voltage sensor is still on the primary battery, but when a deeply discharged AGM is tied in, it will soak up so much power that the alternator WILL respond and try to keep system voltage at 14.3-14.4. Having run this way with an AGM (both AGM now) and a Yandina, I can tell you it may not be perfect but it works very effectively.
 Remember, an automotive alternator is also not designed to run at full output for very long. Try to force it--and it may overheat and burn out.
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K0BG
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« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2010, 06:57:53 AM »

Well, maybe. Using a battery isolator, no matter which one, is problematic in most late model vehicles. Rather than take a bunch of space here, visit my web site and look under Alternators & Batteries. The short answer is, you run a risk of turning on the CEL.

The term deep cycle is a bunch of horse pucky. Any lead acid is considered discharged when the voltage, under load, drops below 10.5. Discharging one further than this drastically shortens the battery's charge cycle life. It doesn't make any difference what the label says either. The other big misunderstanding is that so-called marine batteries are different somehow than an SLI. They aren't. They're just designed to hold a charge longer, up to two years, and still have enough power to start an engine. What you really need to look for in a portable scenario is the Reserve Capacity rating. A YellowTop Optima for example, has a C20 capacity 20% greater Rc, than any of their SLI types. It is even greater than that at a C5.

As I said before, you don't need some fancy dancy charger for a lead acid either, no matter the brand, or what's on the label.

If you want to know more, there is more here than you probably want: http://www.batterycouncil.org/
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