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Author Topic: Crimp On PL259 Supply  (Read 4845 times)
VA3MFD
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Posts: 3




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« on: October 27, 2010, 09:50:05 PM »

Hello All

I am looking for a supplier of PL259 connectors that are crimp on as well as the tool for these connectors. Does anyone know of a good supplier preferably in Canada.

Just bought a house and have so many connections to make with my new antenna farm.

Thanks
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AD5X
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Posts: 1432




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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2010, 03:54:51 AM »

Not Canadian, but I use the $50 High Sierra crimping tool:
www.hamcq.com/coax-coax-connectors-cables-coax-tools/tools-for-coax-connectors/crimping-tool-for-coax-connectors/prod_115.html

And I get my crimp connectors from www.therfc.com.

Phil - AD5X
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N0AZZ
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Posts: 241




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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2010, 05:49:07 AM »

Do not use these for out door antenna connections don't ask me how I know. These are fine for indoor connections and patch cables but not for outdoor use by themselves.
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N3BSZ
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2010, 11:32:08 AM »

Until recently I would not use a crimp connector for anything.  With the new connectors on the market and improved connectors I am willing to give it a try.

The company I work for uses the Times Microwave cables LMR-300 and LMR-400.  I have used both cables with their crimp connectors with no issues.  The biggest issue is cutting the center conductor and shield to length.  I was given a stripper for it and hate it.  I use a sharp blade on a utility knife with no issues.

I have tried to remove the connectors by pulling on them and can not.  Between the crimp ring on the shield and the hot-melt glue shrink cable they do not come apart.

Warning they are costly.
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W3LK
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2010, 11:51:10 AM »

Do not use these for out door antenna connections don't ask me how I know. These are fine for indoor connections and patch cables but not for outdoor use by themselves.

I've been using them outdoors for several years with no ill effects. Two layers of Scotch 33 over the connections and then sprayed with PlastiDip. They've sat in standing water, been covered by snow and so forth for weeks at a time during the winter.

I get mine from therfc.com, as well.
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AD5X
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2010, 05:41:09 AM »

The company I work for uses the Times Microwave cables LMR-300 and LMR-400.  I have used both cables with their crimp connectors with no issues.  The biggest issue is cutting the center conductor and shield to length.  I was given a stripper for it and hate it.  I use a sharp blade on a utility knife with no issues.

I use the DXE cable strippers.  Really great.  Only problem is that the finished center conductor is too long for crimp connectors - but easily fixed with a snip from your cutters.  I paint all my outdoor connectors with Liquid Electrical Tape.

Phil - AD5X
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K7UNZ
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2010, 07:29:47 AM »

Phil, thanks for the link to High Sierra!

Ordered the crimper and a supply of connectors (hi)....

73, Jim/k7unz
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N0AZZ
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2010, 06:10:27 AM »

I had 2 that pulled apart from weight of coax 70' after 1 yr LMR-400 wrapped with good 3M tape one on a crankup tower and the other on a wire antenna w/balun.
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W3LK
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2010, 01:45:47 PM »

I had 2 that pulled apart from weight of coax 70' after 1 yr LMR-400 wrapped with good 3M tape one on a crankup tower and the other on a wire antenna w/balun.

Was the coax not supported at the top to take the strain off the connector? Any connector will fail trying to support 70 feet of LMR-400 all by itself. Simple physics.
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W6GF
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« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2010, 10:26:05 PM »

I have been a ham for 50 years and I am also an advanced degree EE.  The next crimp on PL259 will be my first.  Solder and seal!!

George, W6GF
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W3LK
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« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2010, 08:02:58 AM »

I have been a ham for 50 years and I am also an advanced degree EE.  The next crimp on PL259 will be my first.  Solder and seal!!

George, W6GF

Good for you. The commercial field has been using crimp-on PL-259, N and other connectors for years. Nobody but hams use soldered-on connectors.
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W6GF
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« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2010, 10:13:50 AM »

Really!  Industry uses the crimp on because it is fast and cheap.  They also figure, unlike we hams, installation lives of 5 years.  I think most hams leave their antennas up and connected for much longer periods.  You guys use what you want and in the shack they are probably fine, but on top of an 80 foot tower in the dead of winter, I will stick to solder and seal.

George, W6GF
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N6EY
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« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2010, 08:21:00 PM »

I think many of us in "industry" would disagree with you, George.  The crimp on type, if PROPERLY installed, are as reliable as soldered on.  What's more, there's less of a tendency to melt the dielectric and frankly, they're easier and quicker to install.

R/
Jason
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Jason N6EY
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W2IRT
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« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2010, 06:32:58 AM »

I made this mistake 2 years ago when I redid a bunch of connections for RG-213. I used the .405 crimper and connectors I purchased from therfc.com. Most were in-station patch cables and 6 were on a switchbox at the base of my tower. The external ones were heat-shrinked and Scotch-88'd. Let me be clear that I don't do slap-dash work and was very persnickity as to how my connections were made. Seven failed over the course of roughly one year, including 4 of the 6 outside. For the outside connections it was just the weight of the coax, but unlike an earlier poster, there was only about three feet of cable beneath the connections before the drip-loop and the lead-in to the underground pipe. That should not have been an issue.

Learn how to solder a PL-259 properly and then seal them well (flooded heat shrink or Scotch-130 and multiple wraps of Scotch-88) you won't have to worry about your connections over the long-term. If I'm in a pinch and need to fabricate an interior patch cable I might still use crimp connections (at least until my supply is gone), but never for anything permanent. Also, if you do insist on making crimp connections, at least solder the tip of center connection. Some styles of connector let you both crimp and solder, which would probably be the better way to go.
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AD5X
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« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2010, 09:48:52 AM »

I've been crimping for about 5-years now - using LMR-240 with BNC, N, and UHF crimp connectors.  Easy, fast, and no failures at all.  I test all connections at 500 MHz with a HAMMEG spectrum analyzer/MiniCircuit directional coupler.  Applications include both indoor and outdoor connectors.  All outside connectors are painted with Liquid Electrical Tape.  I won't go back to solder connectors.  However, I haven't built crimped cables for RG-213 or LMR-400, so maybe connections with the larger cables are more problematic.  Hard to believe, but I don't have experience with the larger crimped cables.  But I have had problems with my soldered RG213/LMR400 connectors in the past.

Phil - AD5X
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