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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Heathkit DX-60B manual anyone?  (Read 15156 times)
VE2ITZ
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2010, 07:16:54 PM »

Once again thank you all for all the help, hints and ideas.

I will eventually want to work some AM but i need to build an antenna for 80 meters. Dont know how i would do that since my space is very limited.

And yes i would love to work some nets on 80 meters.

Anyways take care all and sleep well. This Dude will go to sleep in 45 minutes!


Enjoy the weekend and use the ionosphere to work some D.X. on 15 and 12 meters!

 Smiley
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VE2ITZ
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2010, 02:33:17 PM »

While we are at it:

Can any one give me an idea to make this radio safer.  Meaning for example: replacing the line cord, caps and the whole works.


I really do want to live a while still and work at least 15 WPM.



Cheers all!


 
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KE4JOY
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Posts: 1418




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« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2010, 09:12:36 AM »

If I remember correctly the AC connection was by a 2 wire plug cord.

You could replace that with a 3 wire (including chassis 'safety' ground).

Double check that the fusing is properly installed and sized.

Other than that not much more I can think of other than keeping your hands out of the RF cage while operating. Treat the rig with respect while working on it. Know where the B+ is and avoid it.

Since you have a VFO I guess you wont be poking around in the back while the rig is 'hot'.
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VE2ITZ
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2010, 11:27:19 AM »

If I remember correctly the AC connection was by a 2 wire plug cord.

You could replace that with a 3 wire (including chassis 'safety' ground).

Double check that the fusing is properly installed and sized.

Other than that not much more I can think of other than keeping your hands out of the RF cage while operating. Treat the rig with respect while working on it. Know where the B+ is and avoid it.

Since you have a VFO I guess you wont be poking around in the back while the rig is 'hot'.

Thanks for the info, but i still need to know what has to be done exactly in order to replace the power cord.

I know many sites talk about replacing the plug and adding some sort of on board fuse.

I still dont get the picture clearly as to what to plug where and how.

I noticed that there was about 20 volts potential difference between the chasis and the station's ground.

I have also noted that this radio does not have a ground lug in the back.


Please help!


 Smiley


Thanks and 73 de VE2ITZ!
« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 11:30:03 AM by Juan Osorio » Logged
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1418




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« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2010, 12:27:53 PM »

Yea... 20 volts ground potential difference is substantial enough to give you a good tickle. I know Ive been there.

Is your antenna system ground bonded to the electrical service ground at some point? I'm guessing not hence the potential difference.

I don't remember if the AC cord was hard wired or a plug in type. If its hard wired it should be a snap. Just connect the phase & neutral legs just like the two wire cord was before and connect the third "green" 'safety ground' to the chassis with a lug somewhere. If it is a plug in cord its quite a project.

I don't remember what they did for overcurrent protection in the power supply Its been a long time. I will go look at the schematics and get back to you.

Okay I looked and it uses a circuit breaker on the 110v input side of the transformer. Schematic doesent indicate size but but it should be  good enough if its still there and working.

Why the sudden 'safety' concerns?
« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 12:32:00 PM by Tom Whitworth » Logged
VE2ITZ
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2010, 08:20:31 AM »

Thank you for the information.


I have only tested the radio very carefully with a dummy load. Making sure i do not put my hand inside while tuning it or touching the chassis and ground. ALthough when i was doing these tests, i did not connect the chassis to earth ground.

I do have a station ground going to a copper bar which is driven into the ground. I have set this up myself.



Why the sudden concern for safety: well....the more i read about the potential lethal voltage that there is on these tube radios, the more i want to be sure i want to live to send code at 15 WPM.


I remember getting zapped by a hallicrafters CB-17 because of the potential difference between the chassis and earth ground.


As a matter of fact i still recall the first zap i got from touching a TV antenna and walking barefoot at home many years ago when i was probably 4 or 5! Back in El Salvador the house floors are made of tile.


 
« Last Edit: November 11, 2010, 08:27:53 AM by Juan Osorio » Logged
KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1418




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« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2010, 09:06:56 AM »

Adding a safety chassis ground should relieve the ground potential difference.
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VA3AEX
Member

Posts: 22




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« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2010, 01:13:37 PM »

There is a ground lug on the DX-60 beside the VFO input on the rear chassis.  A pic is here: http://www.universal-radio.com/used/Y112rear.jpg

Wiring a 3 prong plug is straight forward: Black wire goes to the fuse (which should then go to the on/off switch, then to one side of the power transformer); White wire goes to the other side of the power transformer; Green wire goes to the ground.

With Grid block keying that the DX-60 uses there will be a negative voltage across your key (I don't have the manual open but think its around -90v).  If you are concerned about the voltage a grid block keying adapter such as the Keyall by WB9KZY should help out: http://wb9kzy.com/keyall.htm

73
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KE4JOY
Member

Posts: 1418




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« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2010, 06:46:20 AM »

There is a ground lug on the DX-60 beside the VFO input on the rear chassis.  A pic is here: http://www.universal-radio.com/used/Y112rear.jpg

Love the warning tag  Grin

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VE2ITZ
Member

Posts: 111




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« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2010, 10:35:22 AM »

There is a ground lug on the DX-60 beside the VFO input on the rear chassis.  A pic is here: http://www.universal-radio.com/used/Y112rear.jpg

Wiring a 3 prong plug is straight forward: Black wire goes to the fuse (which should then go to the on/off switch, then to one side of the power transformer); White wire goes to the other side of the power transformer; Green wire goes to the ground.

With Grid block keying that the DX-60 uses there will be a negative voltage across your key (I don't have the manual open but think its around -90v).  If you are concerned about the voltage a grid block keying adapter such as the Keyall by WB9KZY should help out: http://wb9kzy.com/keyall.htm

73

Thank you Alex for the info!

73 de VE2ITZ!
 Smiley

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