Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: radio storage in cold climate  (Read 955 times)
KT0DD
Member

Posts: 278




Ignore
« on: November 11, 2010, 08:25:09 AM »

Hi all, unfortunately I have to store my station for the next 6-9 months in a basic storage unit with no climate control. I live in Western Colorado where it is a dry climate, and the winters do not get extremely cold like -40, but it can get down to -15 rarely. Is my radio gear safe to do this? It will be boxed in the original packages with the factory plastic wrap. Thanks for any info. 73, Todd - KT0DD
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2010, 08:48:37 AM »

Should be okay.

Don't expect any of it to actually work at that temperature, but when you warm it up, it should be good as new.

Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4506


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2010, 08:50:28 AM »

Just take measures to ensure condensation won't occur.  Wrap it in plastic and for extra credit add a pack of dessicant.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1046




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2010, 10:21:29 AM »

If anything were to freeze, it would probably be the electrolytic capacitors and any batteries, but most can tolerate temperatures lower than you expect to experience.

A related winter problem might be thermal contraction and expansion. Components that warm up too fast could come loose from their joints, sockets or mountings, especially if water can condense inside the rig and freeze when it gets really cold. Rarely, but it does happen, thermal expansion can crack solder joints or cause breaks in circuit board traces. I would try to pack the rigs so that they stay dry and would cool down and warm up slowly; and I wouldn't unnecessarily turn on an ice-cold radio to full power.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6040




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2010, 11:25:26 AM »

Radios can stand up to lower temperatures better than you would expect.  I would do just as K5LXP suggests.  If at all possible, repackage the rigs in their original wrappings and boxes, and put a couple of packs of dessicant in the package with them.  Make sure that they will be away from the floor and will be loosely covered with plastic (outside the boxes) to stop any water or condensation from getting to them.  That's about all you can do--unless you pay extra to get climate controlled storage.

Logged
KB9JXZ
Member

Posts: 36




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2010, 10:11:22 PM »

The dessicant will help a bunch, but in the past i used a good layer of newspaper around the unit then dessicant with radio /equipment in a good sealed plastic bag. I worked for me but maybe I got lucky, I guess the newspaper could hold moisture though. But even if I did wrong it worked for me for two years in Wisconsin. The gear came out great. The stuff only in a plastic bin looked like it was stored for 10 years.

73
 
Logged
VE5RB
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2010, 06:49:23 AM »

I just wanted to point out that there are a bunch of operator in Canada that operate mobile all winter. When I lived in Winnipeg I operated Yaesu FT 857 at -30 to -40'C. The display DID NOT work, but the radio worked fine.

Storage should be easy compared to operation at -40.

YMMV - Dave
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 462




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2010, 10:16:24 AM »

My Ft-8100 stayed in my mobile during the winter of 1998-99 in Fairbanks, Alaska when the winter temp dropped to fifty-five below zero.  It still operates today.  Most problems arise from not letting something acclimate prior to using it.  When I brought something electronic in from the cold, I always let it sit for at least over night.  Condensation is the enemy here.

Mike
Logged
KF5BTI
Member

Posts: 25




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2010, 06:29:08 AM »

If you are going to use dessicant you may want to pick up a larger package of it from a sporting goods store.  These are specifically made for use in gun safes and should add a inexpensive layer of protection to your gear.  I have included a link below but these can be purchased from about any sporting goods store.

http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/#dessicant____-_1-2-4_8-16-32

Michael
kf5bti
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!