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Author Topic: Old expired novice thinkin of refueling the embers.  (Read 2526 times)
WB7OGS
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Posts: 1




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« on: November 14, 2010, 12:34:01 PM »

Greetings to all of you.
I am seriously thinking of getting back into amateur radio again. I used to have a Novice license many years ago (WB7OGS) and actively operated CW QRP with great excitement and pleasure. I can remember acting like a excited child at Christmas when ever somebody would actually respond to my many hours of CQ,CQ,CQ.... on a Heathkit HW-8? or whatever that I had constructed. I will never forget the night when a managed to contact a amateur from Japan. I almost had a accident in my pants. I was only running about 2-3 watts on a 50 foot, or was it a 5000 foot? long wire thrown over the roof of our house with a tennis ball on the end. After about six months of pure excitement, enthisiam, and entrigue  I managed to get my code speed up to about 25 wpm (send and receive) with an old style flat key given to me by my father that he used in WWII as a radio operater and had nailed to the top of my plywwod bench. My ham shack was an old converted 6'  x 10' ticket booth from the local speedway and if I was not froze half the time then I was roasted the other half but that had no impact on my enthusiasm or tenacity to contact the planet Venus on my huge QRP station. Gosh, I sure miss those days. I'd be out there until the rooster crowed. Mother must have thought she made a mistake and dropped her son on his head at some earlier time.
Anyway, I am a silvery 62 years old boy now and I am finding myself dreaming and wishing for that sort of excitement again in my life. I am not looking to be a expert whiz kid in electronics theory or knowledge. I have always had a strong interest in radio and electronics and always seemed to find a way to dismantle and anaylize electronic items to see what made them tick. My departed father had kept a shoe box full of old clock and radio parts for over 50 years and when I asked him about it just before he passed away he said that he was saving them for me in hopes that I would put them all back together again someday. BTW, he was a General Class and his call was K7LBD.
I have been looking at HF equipment out there for the past several days and I see a nice Yaesu FT-107M that seems to stem my interest but not sure if that is the best choice yet. I still need to find a club in the local area and get acquainted. I am so out of touch with the new stuff and what is going on and it looks like I have a lot of retraining to do. I guess in all I am still most interested in HF, CW, and I would also like to get involved in AM and SSB now too. I am not too interested in the VHF/UHF stuff for some wierd unknown reason. I guess I kinda like the skip to my lou thing. I am also a bit of a Old School kinda guy as well and dip and tune are not out of question for me.
So with that I will stop wasting bandwidth here and just wanted to share my interest with like minds out here.
73's
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N2EY
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Posts: 3913




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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2010, 02:39:30 PM »

Three little words:

GO FOR IT!

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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Posts: 671




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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2010, 02:44:04 PM »

Like Jim says........... And Lord knows we NEED you!

VY 73

dm
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1073




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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2010, 04:18:00 PM »

Like the man said "go for it". I am 70 years old and had my first Novice license in 1954. It was KN2OWK then a general license K2OWK. I got married and lost touch with the world of Amateur Radio for 50 years. I got the bug again when I bought a cheep shortwave radio and heard the Amateur chatter going on. I bought a Amateur radio License Manual from Amazon and studied a it a few weeks. I found out the code test was no longer  needed for the license. I had practiced to get my speed up to 13 WPM. It did not take me very long and was worth it even if it was not required. I passed my General test and I am having a ball on the Ham Bands. I am using my old boat anchor Heathkit SB-401-1 transmitter and  a modern by my standards Yaesu FRG-7000 receiver. I just got the License Manual for Amateur Extra Class. It will require more study then I remember. Satellite locations and rise and fall calculations that were not there in the 1950s, but it is fun and will be well worth it. Just a note if you check the FCC data base, see if your old call is still available. If it is you can get reissued to you through the Vanity call system. That's what I did. In this day and age it is not necessary you live in a call location in which your original license was issued.
Good luck to you. I will listen for you on the air.
73s
K2OWK
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AC0TP
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2010, 09:10:04 AM »

Like the ad says, "just do it!"

Your story sounds like mine. I'm 51 and a brand new ham. My interest in Amateur Radio began years ago when I was 15 years old. I never got my license, but I did build a receiver from plans from the 1974 ARRL Handbook. I figured that I needed to start by listening, and that I would next build the transmitter. Well, real life intervened, and the transmitter wasn't ever built. But I sure learned a lot building that receiver.

In the ensuing years I've had ham friends, admired their rigs, did a little SWL and generally watched from the sidelines. A health scare about a year ago made me take stock of things. No, I didn't turn immediately to Amateur Radio, but I'm taking life a lot differently than I had.

About 4 months ago I received an unsolicited commercial e-mail (spam) for a neat little Chinese HT. I started thinking about it, started looking into the current licensing requirements, started studying, took my tests at a recent hamfest, and now I'm a licensed ham! I've been on VHF and UHF since then, and I've been assembling my HF station at home, which I expect to have up and running this weekend.

I've been reminded how enthusiasm is contagious. I've been talking to friends about my studies for the ham license, and I got two of them to study for, and pass, their Tech license. Several more have been pondering out loud about getting into the hobby and want to come over and see my station. Another friend who has been a ham for years but inactive upgraded his Advanced license to an Extra, and he has been my Elmer. No, I didn't buy the Wouxun, but one of my friends with his new Tech license did.

73
Mick, AC0TP
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 09:16:38 AM by Mick Toothaker » Logged
K5TEN
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Posts: 146


WWW

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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2010, 12:36:06 PM »

DO IT!!!!

You will be both shocked, amazed, and in awe of not only the new technology but all the new modes!

Yes, you can still have a tube radio that "glows" while you communicate world-wide...and YES, CW is alive and well and it's popularity is actually GROWING!  You can do low power (like back in your "good old days") or get your General and go high power.

Better yet, today's "Tech" class get prime CW realestate on 80, 40, and 15 (not to mention SSB & CW on 10 meters) that we would have both drooled over in our old novice days.  No CW test to past mind you but if I had a dollar for every Tech I run across doing CW on 80 and 40 meters I'd be sitting on a brand new Icom HF rig!  They aren't required to learn code--they WANT to learn code...and get in on some juicy DX!

Good luck!  I can't wait to work you on the air!!!

73

Bruce
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2010, 06:17:33 PM »

My entry into ham radio was also with a Novice ticket,  I had tons of FUN.

As soon as I could I bought a rig that didn't have Plate Load and a gang of variable caps that had to be adjusted for each band.

Luxury!
Rig like that with an automatic tuner--Oh My God was that heavenly!

Then, a filter to take out carriers along with a built in keyer!

I bought my Kenwood TS 950S in, well, I don't remember?  I'd have to go back into my paper logs to find when I added it to my station.

Best Wishes from Tucson AZ
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KB3HG
Member

Posts: 404




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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2010, 05:29:27 AM »

Vic,
Welcome back, jump right in, the waters fine. The best part is we are starting on a solar upswing in the sunspot cycle. Propagation is starting to get better. You timing could not be better.

Tom Kb3hg

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N0ZNA
Member

Posts: 115




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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2010, 05:12:08 PM »

Vic,
Welcome back, jump right in, the waters fine. The best part is we are starting on a solar upswing in the sunspot cycle. Propagation is starting to get better. You timing could not be better.

Tom Kb3hg        Good luck on getting back into it,but i thought the novice calls where kn or wn back then...73s de n0zna/John


« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 05:13:49 PM by john williams » Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3913




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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2010, 05:25:30 PM »

i thought the novice calls where kn or wn back then...

From the 1951 creation of the Novice license until at least the mid-1970s, Novices had distinct calls that were changed when you upgraded.

In the 48 contiguous states, the letter before the number in the call was an N or V (WN3IYC, WV2LGJ). Outside the 48 states, the first letter was made a W instead of a K (WH6ABC).
Upon upgrading, the call would be changed.

One problem with the whole callsign-change thing is that your QSLs became obsolete when you upgraded.

Ancient history now.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2825




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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2010, 09:06:24 PM »

One problem with the whole callsign-change thing is that your QSLs became obsolete when you upgraded.
73 de Jim, N2EY

Jim - most of us got the QSLs printed with what we knew would be our "new" calls, and added the novice "N" by hand.  All of my cards from that era read "K7KBN", but if you look closely, there's a tiny handwritten "N" between the first K and the 7.  Lots cheaper that way.

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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N0ZNA
Member

Posts: 115




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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2010, 06:01:40 PM »

Vic,
Welcome back, jump right in, the waters fine. The best part is we are starting on a solar upswing in the sunspot cycle. Propagation is starting to get better. You timing could not be better.

Tom Kb3hg        Good luck on getting back into it,but i thought the novice calls where kn or wn back then...73s de n0zna/John


What im saying is if he was a novice his call would be a kn or wn whatever...73s
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