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Author Topic: Contest points from non competitors.  (Read 1289 times)
G7HEU
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« on: August 02, 2003, 08:12:08 AM »

Hello all

I am not a contester - my humble antenna wouldn't get me very far!

Anyway, I understood that wether I was submitting a log or not a call to contesters was welcome - for the extra point. And yes, I do understand the need for brevity - it's just nice for me to get a quick exchange from some 'big' stations. I just called a Russian station on 20Mtrs and then replied 'you are 5/9 001'. He told me (at some length !) that '001'was not going to get me very far in the contest and that he was on 083.

So guys, what's the drill? Now I am reluctant to answer any other contest CQs in case I'm getting in the way.

Thanks in advance for your advice

Steve
M0HEU / G7HEU.
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G7HEU
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« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2003, 12:52:01 PM »

I have the answer! I learnt some hours later that in this particular contest stns wanted the date of my first liscence. It was a language problem ( on his part of course - I should have used my Russian :-) )

Thanks all for your time anyway.

Steve.
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N2MG
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Posts: 123



« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2003, 05:52:49 PM »

There are a few contests that will toss out QSOs with stations who do not send in a log - but these are by far the minority.  In fact, I am aware of only one (but I forget which one)

Most of the time, your QSOs are welcome - a contest is a perfect time for those with "less-equipped" stations to work some good DX.

I see you got tripped by that age-old problem of not knowing what the exchange is!  Welcome to the club. ;-)

73 Mike N2MG

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WA9SVD
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Posts: 2198




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« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2003, 11:17:53 PM »

I also don't contest, but I like to give out points; if as Mike said, there are contests that throw out contacts for stations that don't submit logs, that's downright un-Amateurish!   I only work "contests" a few minutes to a few hours, so I don't send in logs.  But for a contest to not allow my contact is pretty bad.
    That said, I check (the ARRL site) for any contsets that may be running, to familiarize myself enough with the rules to know what exchange is required.  If they want age, rank, serial number, OK.  But the guy who said #001 won't get you far should realize that not everyone HAS to compete, or CARES to compete, and should be happy to get your point.  (OR, add a couple of thousand to his number and see how he reacts!  [If he says you're # 83, say he's # 2083.]  JUST KIDDING>)
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G7HEU
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2003, 07:07:25 AM »

Thanks for your input guys.

Just to be clear, the Russian gent was trying to explain that his liscense was issued in 1983 and he wanted the date of my first ticket.

As you have both suggested I have now learned to at least look up the contest on the net first. That might sound fundamental to old hands but I never realised there could be so many variations on the required exchange.

Be warned that I have found a friendly farmer that might let me use a field occasionally for beams etc. You might just see me in a future contest after all!

Steve.
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N2MG
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Posts: 123



« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2003, 09:09:17 AM »

Yes, there are numerous varieties to the exchange

RST, state/province, power level, serial number, year first licensed, name, CQ zone, IARU zone, ARRL/VE section (in some US/VE domestic contests).

The IARU zone vs. CQ zone can be the most problematic as most folks don't know of their existence, or what the differences are.  Fortunately only a few contests use them.

Mike N2MG
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N2MG
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Posts: 123



« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2003, 09:10:32 AM »

Steve, that's indeed good news on the potential for access to some land!  Be careful, however: only in rare cases is there a cure for the contesting bug.

Mike N2MG
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BUCK
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Posts: 22




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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2003, 02:51:40 AM »

I was like you in the IARU HF World Championships this past July.  I entered just to get the contacts but I ended up having fun.  When I filled in the log information to submit (I don't know if it was needed or not) I discovered that I could have worked toward a certificate of achievement of sorts at the same time.  It was a pretty easy achievement and a thoughtful award for those who do participate for the fun and to give points to others.  

Now I am hooked.  Unfortunately, like many others, I don't have enough faith in my dipole and barefoot radio that I will win a contest, but I can compete with myself.  I have decided to get the contest information in advance and prepare to participate. Record my results such as number of DX, states, Zones, Continents, contacts, etc.  Compare the results to the next contest.  See if I am improving or not.  I could also set a goal to work all states or a minimum number of countries etc.  Submitting the log would be a way to compare my results against my previous results each year in the same contest.  I won't get the most overall points in Field day on my QRP rig and a dipole almost on the ground, but I might get a better score this year than I did last year.  (It would definately be a challenge hi hi).

Maybe some of us can start a "Handicap score" group for contestors who need to compete on a level ground.  Apartment dwellers with indoor antennas, dipole only antennas, etc.  

Well, your thoughts?

Buck
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KD5YDY
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2003, 02:45:59 AM »

Be sure you read the contest rules before you decide to use a farmer's field as your station. For the September VHF QSO Party, note: 1.9.Only recognized FM simplex frequencies may be used, such as 144.90 to 145.00; 146.49, .55 and .58, and 147.42, .45, .48, .51, .54 and .57 MHz on the 2-meter band.

Don't establish shack in farmer's field. You'll end up in 2.2.Single Operator Portable:
2.2.1. Ten (10) W PEP output or less.
2.2.2.Portable power source.
2.2.3.Portable equipment and antennas.
2.2.4.Single Operator Portable stations must operate from a location other than a permanent station location.
2.2.5.Single Operator Portable stations may not change locations during the contest period outside of the original 500-meter diameter permitted circle.

If you're a rover, you need to be aware of the Rover rules:

2.3. Rover: One or two operators of a single station that moves among two or more grid squares during the course of a contest.
2.3.1.A rover vehicle may transport only one station using a single call sign.
2.3.2.A rover may not operate with more than one call sign.
2.3.3.Rover vehicles must transport all the equipment, power supplies, and antennas used at each operating site.
2.3.4.Rovers sign "rover" on phone and /R on CW after their call sign.
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G7HEU
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« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2003, 07:10:00 PM »

Guys

I havn't checked this thread for a few days so only just read the latest input - thanks.

We don't have that many VHF contests here and I think I'm right in saying that the biggest of the year is 6th September. I'm getting married that day. Understanding as she is I think muffled calls of 'CQ contest' from under my jacket might cause problems!

There will be LIMITED operation as CT3 / M0HEU on honeymoon though. And yes she does have a sister....

Steve.
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KA8SEP
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Posts: 38




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« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2003, 12:19:03 AM »

Hi,

   I only have 10 meters right now, but I got in on a 10-10 contest. I made sure i qso'ed a couple stations. so if my call sign was called into question. I would have a it on a couple of logs.

Ted
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ON4MGY
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2003, 02:58:10 PM »

"I am not a contester - my humble antenna wouldn't get me very far!"

Don't think you can't contest with a modest antenna dear OM. I just can place a vertical (Fritzel GPA-50) between the houses in my very small garden but I do enjoy contesting. I'm also running max 100 Watts outpu on SSB or 30W on RTTY.
If you're using such a setup, you'll surely won't beat the high power contest stations with their stacked beams, but you'll work a lot of DX from around the world, especially in a contest like CQ WW or CQ PFX. Contesting is a great way to work easily great DX you wouldn't work normally.
It is always good to look before a contest to the rules, or first listen a while to know what the exchange is.
Anyway, just join once a contest for just a couple of hours and you'll find out how great it is!!

73 and CU in contest

ON4MGY Nic



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N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 123



« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2003, 11:44:34 AM »

ON4MGY is right - get on with whatever antenna you have!

Lots of contesters have really great "ears" (by virtue of *their* antennas, and experience) so you can still  work lots of them.  Waiting until you have stacked monobanders is a sin!

Mike N2MG
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KC0ODY
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Posts: 78




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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2003, 05:17:23 PM »

I like to work contests too, but I'm not competitive-taking part in contests was just a great way for me to get my first 100 DX entities very quickly. If I gave an exchange with a "serial number", mine was usually pretty low, but the contester on the other end didn't seem to mind-- I gave him/her a new contact and I never got any comments about how low the numbers were-- they were usually too busy getting on to the next contact to mention it.

By the way, 'inferior' antennas can do wonderful things, even if they're not the big beams that many contesters use. I worked my first 100 DX entities within 5 months of gaining my General using nothing more than a vertical up 18 and a half feet and a homemade 17 meter dipole that was only up about 15 feet (that one got me numerous stations in the South Pacific). It's more of a challenge to get the contacts with anything less than a big beam, but that's more than half the fun from my point of view.

Have fun!
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