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Author Topic: Run Negative to battery or Ground the negative at the radio in 2010 GMC ?  (Read 5299 times)
KI4TAT
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« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2010, 06:45:31 PM »

i have a 2004 suburban. in the engine compartment is a red box on drivers side of engine with a power terminal in it for aux power.  right near this connection on the alternator support is a tapped hole with the word "ground" on it.  both are easy to access.  connected my radio power leads (fused) to these points with soldered ring terminals on wires.  would expect gm to have similar arrgt on 2010 gmc also.

ki4tat
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K0BG
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« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2010, 06:07:35 AM »

I don't suspect later models have the terminal. The issue nowadays, it the current and the voltage is monitored by the engine CPU. If you put a load on the system it didn't expect to be there, you run a chance of turning on the CEL. In any GM product since 2008, the data is written into the extended portion of the CPU's memory, and code readers can't erase the data.
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2010, 09:33:17 PM »

hi,

http://www.obd-2.com

this diagnostic software will reset all codes in all makes and models.
I've been using his software since 1999 and it saved me big money.

73 james
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K0BG
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« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2010, 06:23:21 AM »

Great Stuff Jim, but we're talking EXTENDED data, and that remains. It cannot be erased, even by a dealer! They can turn off the light, but that's it.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2010, 07:20:30 AM »

I'm sure there's all sorts of "extra" data in there, for who knows what purpose.  I'm guessing that Alan thinks or knows this information will be used against the owner in the case of some difficulty but I would think the burden of proof would be upon the dealer to establish a link between whatever event is recorded and whatever the problem is.   If even the dealer can't access "extended data", then is there even really a problem?  I would think it would be terribly unusual for a properly installed radio to cause any problem at all, or at worse a few nuisance check engine lights until the issue is resolved.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K0BG
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« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2010, 09:15:15 AM »

You're more or less correct Mark.

GM is sort of ahead of the pack in this regard, but all vehicles sold in the US must have OBDII-EOBD by the 2012 model year. The data must store a specific data set dictated by the NHTSA. Most of it deals with crash stats. They can tell if you have used the Navi, radio, whatever just before the crash data was recorded. They're looking for distraction information of course. In fact, the NHTSA is thinking about disabling the input to Navi systems unless you're in Park. Talk about big brother!

Whatever else they store is up to the manufacturer. For example, one bit of data stored by the CPU in a Corvette is any over-rev condition. They've already used the data in several warranty denial claims. Probably the most insidious data set, is the last 5 minutes of recored audio! What would happen if that audio data contained road rage, and your insurance company used it to deny a claim? Ugh!
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K5LXP
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« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2010, 10:07:45 AM »

Sure, they're treating the OBD ECU as a black box.  The early ones kept a few seconds of data just prior to an airbag deployment but of course with today's level of integration there is probably an entire CPU or system just to collect diagnostic and user data.  I would've thought there'd be an OBDIII standard by now but I guess they're just extending the OBDII feature set.

I hadn't heard about the audio recording before, that's interesting.  Probably just a matter of time before there's video too and they can see you picking your nose, putting on makeup or reading a book.  Since your car is considered an extension of your residence I don't see how they can legally collect this information without your consent.  I suspect if this kind of data gathering is ever contested you'll find them incorporating a operator switch to disable it, but at the same time the insurance or the dealer can use the state of the switch to determine your premium or applicability of a warranty claim.

You'd think that if the system is monitoring Ah in and out of the system there'd be a way to accomodate dynamic accessory draws.  Whether it's a ham radio, charging a laptop or plugging in a tire inflator there will always be user power demands outside of the devices supplied with the vehicle.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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