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Author Topic: Contesters out of recommended band scope  (Read 758 times)
KG4WMP
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Posts: 13




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« on: July 27, 2003, 01:33:32 AM »

I was looking at the dxcluster trying to find some more IOTA contacts and noticed hams below the recommended range of 14.225 - 14.300 (ssb). Why would someone move to say 14.222 and discount all us General class hams out here? I am working on Extra but for now my limit is 14.225 and up.
KG4WMP  
       
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KG4WMP
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« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2003, 01:46:05 AM »

This is even worse.  I was just scanning around 80M and heard a DJ6 station calling "CQ contest" on 7070.25.  Even worse, there were people calling back.  Isn't that in the CW portion of the band?  I have only been a ham for 7 months so maybe I'm missing something.  Do the band plan rules not apply for contests?  Thanks for the replies.

KG4WMP
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N8UZE
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« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2003, 09:04:03 AM »

You are confusing band plans with regulated limits.  In the US, we have regulated limits (i.e. 7.0 to 7.150 is CW and digital only)with band plans layered on top (i.e. RTTY at around 7.080).  Regulations are mandatory while band plans are voluntary.  Now what you are missing is that the regulations and band plans in other countries and other continents differ from those in the US.  For example, it is perfectly legal for a European station to operate voice at 7.070.  They are limited by regulation to a 40 meter band of only 7.0 to 7.1 total.

When the foreign stations want to operate US on 40 meters (or otherwise outside the US regulated limits), they work "split".  That is they transmit on a frequency that is legal in their country but listen on a frequency that is legal for the US to transmit on.  There is no particular requirement or custom as to what the split will be.  The DX station finds a couple of open frequencies and off he goes.  For example, he may find that 7.040 and 7.260 are open, so he will transmit on 7.040 and say something like "listening 260."

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N8UZE
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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2003, 09:06:18 AM »

Also, regulations cannot be ignored during contests however band plans sometimes are even though it is considered bad practice to do so.  The DJ station you heard was probably following the band plans of his/her own country so would NOT be considered as ignoring the band plan.
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KG4WMP
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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2003, 04:04:26 PM »

Ok, that makes more sense, working split.  But if he was working split I should not have heard the US stations coming back to him on the same frequency, they would have been up some.  Some of the people coming back may have been "out of us", but the ones naming the state they were in kinda makes you wonder...
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N2MG
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Posts: 127



« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2003, 10:26:13 AM »

Sounds like you heard a lot of sloppy US stations calling on the DX frequency - I've heard that on numerous occasions. While it can happen anytime, it is especially prevalent when the DX is spotted on packet - often without a QSX (listening) frequency - and the stateside lemmings grab the spot without looking and start transmitting.

In the "old days", when one had to tune the radio by hand, going past the band edge was uncommon. Even when packet arrived, one still had to turn that big knob... Today, many stations have their radios computer-controlled so a press of a key tunes the radio to the spot automatically. Little brains involved. If the spot's out of the band, so what?

Just another small mote on Ham Radio's eye. ;-)

Mike N2MG
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BUCK
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Posts: 22




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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2003, 03:12:31 AM »

I heard the same thing just about a week ago.  A K5 station working DX near 7.080.  Either he got carried away with the opportunity to talk to the DX or he may have been in another country.  Chances are that if he makes a habbit of working out-of-priviliges, he will have very deep pockets - empty ones.

First time I heard it, I dug up the band plans and regulations to verify that I hadn't overlooked another change in the rules.  

Buck
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AG5T
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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2003, 10:07:00 AM »

I know that most operators stay within their band plans, but this weekend's cqww sure had some interesting "calling" frequencies. I did not know that any country had ssb priviledges as low as 7.008 - if this is the case, then I guess those countries can operate ssb for the entire 40-meter band? I did see a post for a US station calling cq down low in 40 meters, but I think he hit the wrong vfo and soon figured out what was happening. Hopefully when 40 meters is changed in a few years, it will make for easier ssb conditions in contests. US stations sometimes fuss about dx that doesn't work split. I also find 40 meter psk and rtty to be difficult because there is almost always somebody on ssb in those frequencies. What if you can never find an open rtty frequency? PSK is a bit easier since the signal is so small. -- Getting back to the out of band -- a while back I heard an XX9 on 21.198 in a contest. Many, many US stations were sliding over to the frequency and working the station on ssb. In my opinion, these were illegal contacts. I've never worked an XX9 and sure would like to add one to my dx worked list, but I just could not pull myself to go below the limit. Was I right or wrong? Where I live (Houston) most people drive 15 to 20 miles over the posted speed limit and nobody cares. Does that apply to frequencies? After all, you could just write 21 MHz on the qsl card. Nobody has to know the exact frequency you were on. -- One final thing about contests and frequencies -- a US station had been calling contest for several hours (on a frequency around 14.160 or so I think which is legit for US) and
then a dx spot comes up for YA on a frequency almost exactly the same. Another station comes on and says the contester is interfering with the rare dx. The contester says he has been there and does not have to move. The other US station says "Who's more important?" - in other words, saying, the YA is more important than the US contester, so the US contester MUST relinquish the frequency to the YA. The US contester did not move and keep contesting. The others tried to work the YA. It was a mess. I side with the contester, however. Just some thoughts about contesting and frequencies.
Marty, AG5T






















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VK2CZ
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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2004, 03:02:45 AM »

For what it is worth, here in VK, operating say on 7.010 with SSB is technically legal, but expect a flurry of CW ops ticking their keyers to 'push you on'. We can and do use 30m with SSB a lot locally as well.

The thing you will hear below the USA 7.150 SSB limits is the KH6 and pacific guy's which is legal for them.

Getting down to 80m SSB is even more of a 'split' issue, as in your case you can use SSB down to 3853, whereas anyone in VK is restricted to 3500~3700 and 3779~3800 only.

It gets interesting for everyone.
All the best
David VK2CZ,  OC-001
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