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Author Topic: morse , a fascinating subject  (Read 2313 times)
M0JHA
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Posts: 646




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« on: November 24, 2010, 06:49:14 AM »

isn't it a pity lots of people know little on morse code ? its a pity morse isn't as well known with people as it should be ,its quite fascinating , everyone who comes to my house and see the keys proudly displayed in my living room are amazed and take a genuine interest and want to hear me on the key..

i have a key set up to an occilator in my display and they all want a go and you can see they would love to be able to do it ..

most are amazed that people actually use morse code now theres no war on :-) and some of my friends didn't believe me when i explained i speak to people almost as i do with them and almost the same way i would texing them.

im a newbie compared to many people on the cw bands ( 2 years on cw and abt 3-4 on ham radio total )  but the more i look into keys and its history the more fascinated im becoming.

billy
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AE4RV
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2010, 08:20:31 AM »

Amen.
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AB9NZ
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Posts: 177




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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2010, 09:47:12 AM »

  Billy, it's the darnedest thing, but even little kids can tell that it's something really special. Tom AB9NZ
 http://radiotelegrapher.posterous.com
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2010, 11:31:47 AM »

It's about the only thing I "demo" to non-ham visitors because it actually catches their interest.

I've had non-ham visitors in the shack when I was working exotic places nobody's ever heard of on SSB...people with funny accents coming emanating from the speaker...nobody seems to really care.

But I make a CW contact and "tell" the visitors what's going on, and let them hear the code, and they're generally interested to know more.  I could be working a neighbor and tell the visitors I'm working the moon, and they wouldn't know the difference.  But the dits and dahs draw their attention, and often they want to know more about ham radio.

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N4MJG
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Posts: 506


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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2010, 12:37:28 PM »

I got intereted in morse code back 05 or 06 right before they the code when i took the test that is sending  not receiving ! because of my hearing problem !i can send good without any problem !now receiving is hard part for me. i won't gave up just taking little more time ,little rusty right now getting better every time i do it !

Morse code is fun ! this is the only mode i have not try yet when i took that test at that time.but will getting there   sooner or later !!!! i'll get there but just take time....



73
Jackie
N4MJG
WWW.N4MJG.COM
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2813




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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2010, 01:52:04 PM »

There are a couple boys in one of the 4th grade classes at the school where I volunteer three days a week.  Their desks are toward the back of the room, right next to each other.  As I was "patrolling" the area I heard what I thought was them talking to each other but as I got closer, it was obvious that they were using "dahs" and "dits", at around 5 WPM.  I "read the mail" for about a minute before I broke into their QSO, telling them they should pay attention to what the teacher was talking about! 

After class, talking with the boys in a more conventional mode, I learned that they were both scouts, working on the reinstituted Signalling merit badge.  I'm working with them both - they want to get their licenses but didn't know exactly how.

Some volunteer days are better than others!
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB3CQM
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2010, 02:26:34 PM »

I got intereted in morse code back 05 or 06 right before they the code when i took the test that is sending  not receiving ! because of my hearing problem !i can send good without any problem !now receiving is hard part for me. i won't gave up just taking little more time ,little rusty right now getting better every time i do it !

Morse code is fun ! this is the only mode i have not try yet when i took that test at that time.but will getting there   sooner or later !!!! i'll get there but just take time....



73
Jackie
N4MJG
WWW.N4MJG.COM


I have no idea how bad your hearing is and sorry you have one.

I can not hear high pitch. I have not had my hearing tested but I know from not wearing hearing protection and shooting perhaps a million rounds from shotguns , my hearing is pretty bad.

My neighbor who is a ham could not figure out how I can copy super weak cw signals . No matter how weak a dx station is I will hear them .  Secret --- I wear the best head phones you can buy.

When working a dx station  I can also go into the pile up and listen with  no narrow filters in.  With head phones I can hear the weak stations in between the others.

You can not have worse hearing them me without having almost total loss of hearing. Try head phones if you never have used them.

JIM

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N4MJG
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Posts: 506


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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2010, 02:48:34 PM »

I got intereted in morse code back 05 or 06 right before they the code when i took the test that is sending  not receiving ! because of my hearing problem !i can send good without any problem !now receiving is hard part for me. i won't gave up just taking little more time ,little rusty right now getting better every time i do it !

Morse code is fun ! this is the only mode i have not try yet when i took that test at that time.but will getting there   sooner or later !!!! i'll get there but just take time....



73
Jackie
N4MJG
WWW.N4MJG.COM


I have no idea how bad your hearing is and sorry you have one.

I can not hear high pitch. I have not had my hearing tested but I know from not wearing hearing protection and shooting perhaps a million rounds from shotguns , my hearing is pretty bad.

My neighbor who is a ham could not figure out how I can copy super weak cw signals . No matter how weak a dx station is I will hear them .  Secret --- I wear the best head phones you can buy.

When working a dx station  I can also go into the pile up and listen with  no narrow filters in.  With head phones I can hear the weak stations in between the others.

You can not have worse hearing them me without having almost total loss of hearing. Try head phones if you never have used them.

JIM





I have headphone , i just needed a  better headphone otherwise  i needed a  quiter room !!! hihi

plus need set the pitch just right. as i remember hearing test round 750 !


73
Jackie
N4MJG
WWW.N4MJG.COM
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 02:50:30 PM by Jackie Green » Logged
N0BOF
Member

Posts: 37




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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2010, 04:52:29 AM »

I put on a "Wireless Technology" class throughout the school year (I'm not a teacher, I'm the school district's Police Officer trying to get kids interested in all areas of wireless tech, leaning heavy towards amateur radio)and they love learning about code. I tell them Morse code was the world's first text messaging. Wink
We talk about how the "new fangled technology" at the time saved all of those people on a ship named the Titanic. It's amazing how fast they pick it up. The other thing the kids find very interesting is Satelite communication.
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2010, 10:43:22 PM »

You are so right Billy.

Morse is hard to define, but the fascination seems to be universal, almost like the affection that most people have for a friendly dog.
There just seems something magical about morse, which is not found in modern communication devices.
Perhaps it is that it seems like a language, which takes quite a bit of effort to learn, or that the decoding and encoding is done via human organs.
Then there are the many times beautiful pieces of craftmanship, in the form of morse keys, bugs and paddles.
Many are more elaborate and beautifully finished than would be warranted today in the age of simple utility for a switch.
I use a 60 year old bug made in France, which although made for a budget is just as sound as the day it was made.
When one considers the hard use and loving care this bug has endured, it is simply an honour to continue using it for its intended purpose.
A nautical sextant is another piece of hardware, which in many ways is analogous to the romance of the morse key, bug or paddle.
And finally, when using a key/bug/paddle, after much practice, one finally enters a state of zen, where the act of sending is as natural as speaking - a truly calm and enjoyable state.

And of course, as a morse afficionado, you are the latest in a line of operators stretching from the first telegraph, over and on the seas, and in the air.
If aliens intercept our transmissions, the first they will hear will be our faltering spark transmitters sending morse code.
I think they would be impressed.

73s
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